Irish Missionary

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Preacher Jeremy

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Top o' the morning to ye. People call me preacher, and I felt this is the place to tell ye about myself. I was born and grew up in 1700's Ireland, and after much thought, took up the cloth to become a man o' the word. Upon a strong calling from the Lord, I packed my few belongings, bought a ticket, and sailed across the pond to the good old U.S.A. I landed on the east coast, and other than meeting my lovely wife, who many call Many-Paws, I found it to be troublesome, and began to wonder if the good Lord truly sent me to this God forsaken place. That's when Many-Paws and I felt the call to the wilds of this fair land. So we packed our things and headed to the hills, determined to preach the gospel to all we met, native or white. We have found peace with ourselves, and made many friends along the way, not regretting a thing.
 

pargent

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Best check on Irish history especily religion etc before going to far , match the time frame as well very sticky subject . :)
 

Carteret Kid

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Sounds like you would be a Presbyterian with a Scottish background. The ruling gentry in Ireland then were mostly English/ Anglican. The native majority were Catholic.
To rule over a hostile population the English brought over Scotish Presbyterians as armed enforcers. Eventually many of tem tired of being treated as second class Protestants and begain a great migration to the colonies. They were called the Scotish Irish, but called themselves IRISH. They became a major ethnic part of the fronteer.
 

Preacher Jeremy

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As I see it, my persona is one who being a true Irishman, grew up catholic. However, after a falling out with the catholic church, caused by doctrinal disagreements, I took on a more evangelistic non-denominational approach. Through out history, there have always been those within the church who didn't fit the norm, and worshiped God in their own way. Even though we rarely hear about them (With the exception of those involved in the reformation) to this day we still have these small pockets of believers, and according to my research, this has been going on since Roman times, and the infancy of the church. Thus, Preacher is not bound by rules applied by what ever denomination he would have belonged to, allowing him to be a man of the people as well as a man of the cloth. To that end, Preacher is quick to dress in work close, roll up his sleeves and help get things done, as well as putting on his Sunday best to preach to the people of his small gathering, a method of evangelism used by Saint Patrick and his followers with great success with the Irish people.
 

Carteret Kid

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On the frontier the Baptist made do with "jack leg" farmer preachers, while the Lutheran, Presbyterian and Methodists insisted on educated preachers. The Methodist clergy became "Circuit Riders" The Presbyterians and Lutheran clergy were more settled. Frontier Religion had to be mobile to keep up with the covered wagons.
For reenacting you will need appropriate Clerical garb. And please dont bring theological arguments to the events.
 

gearheart

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I love the handle your spouse has chosen. :rotf:
One hot flash of an idea. :thumbsup:
 

Preacher Jeremy

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I have been on the look out for some preaching robes and such, however being on a fairly tight budget, it ain't easy. I suppose that is why I chose the working man's preacher for my persona, however,I would still like to find an affordable outfit for Sundays and such. As an ordained minister, I think it would be brilliant to perform a wedding at vous someday,and the garb would really come in handy. As to your concerns about me getting into peoples face over religion, don't worry, I'm a firm believer in letting people make their own decisions. However, I am always open to such conversations if others start them, and the conversation stays civil.
 

bangfxr

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Sweet Joseph, Mary un Jesus. Tis another disgraced catholic runin aboot Amerika :grin: Welcome aboard Reverend, brother or father? Being a holy man at voos is a tall order but I don't foresee any issues it will depend on your vestments and the time frame. It took a bit of research and getting the paterans for making the proper clothing and now I get to voos as an irish militiaman and the folks where I shoot like the idea of the different aspects of history there and folks visiting enjoy the differences as well. Good luck.
 

Preacher Jeremy

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Actually, the name was given to her by a gent named Yellow-Legs, due to the fact that we take our two dogs to vous with us, and for a while the misses was bringing a kitten that she had rescued, as it was abandoned by his feral mother days after opening his eyes. Yellow-Legs asked how many critters we got in our home, to which the better half answered,"Well, we have two dogs, and four cats, as well as a pride of feral cats I feed outside". Yellow-legs looked at her and said, "that's a lot of paws, from now on your Many-Paws". Even though she knew she was in for some harassment, she owned the name.
 

TFoley

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You'd be more believable as a raving Welsh Baptist than any kind of a lapsed cattlick Irishman.

Just sayin'

tac
 

crockett

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What was the "Church of Ireland"? I thought it was the Irish equivalent of the Anglican Church in England and that about 30% of the population of Ireland was protestant- in one denomination or another?
And...did they have missionaries? I am interested in the mountain man era and I thought a lot were Methodist.
 

pargent

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Just go with what Carteret kid posted, the time line for your persona is closer to 1850-60 , and Iam not going to get myself banned trying to explain it to you , sake read up on your subject . :)
 

54ball

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I'll bite.

Native Irish in the 1700s, most likely you have been raised Catholic.

Scots Irish, Some were secret Catholic that were offered land and title by the British Crown to rule over the native Irish. Many had to convert to the Church of England to gain land and title in Ireland.
This helped the British subdue the native Irish and it also got the warlike Scots out of their backyard.

Most native Irish were poor serf class in that era, Tenant farmers under the Scots and Brits.

Why would you leave Ireland? Maybe a love affair with a Anglican? This would alienate the couple from both sides.

Cost of voyage...7 years of indentured service. Maybe a crime was committed and you were sent as prisoner to Georgia. Maybe your 1st wife dies in all this? It was common for a man to have 3 wives in his life in those days, child birth illness, sometimes the women just worked themselves to death by age 30.

Lets assume you can read.

In the early mid 1700s was the time for the first Great Awakening. John Wesley originally a Anglican had a method of study.... Hence Methodism. Also the Germanic Calvinists were on missions at this time. Study the Great Awakening.....

Who traded with the Indians at this time...Scot and Scots Irish maybe a cousin or friend of you or your dead wife.

This is how you get to the frontier. Just some suggestions......

As a trader you live with the Indians eventually as one of them. You marry into the tribe.
As you can read, they become curious of your faith. It begins from there.

So IMHO you need no robes unless you attach yourself to a specific sect.
 

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