Inexpensive throwing hawk recommendations?

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CaptainKirk

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Looking to get a throwing hawk. There are tons out there with prices all over the map. Looking for a recommendation for a well-balanced, historically correct thrower that won't break the bank.
 

hawkeye2

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Crazy Crow has imported hawks that are very functional and handles are available too. They are hand forged with some arc welding that doesn't show too. The handles are very plain but can be stained or painted.

 

Rifleman1776

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Much as I hate to say this, the made in India hawks look good and are stout. I bought two at a ronny not knowing they were imports. They look like the high priced American forged ones we usually see.
 

Notchy Bob

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I think it's sort of hit or miss with the cheap imported tomahawks. I've bought two from Cabelas, thinking to save some money. The ones I got were extremely hard and difficult to sharpen. On one, the handle was a poor fit. I decided not to throw it but to try to fix it up for a camp axe. I melted lead and poured it in the eye around the handle to fill the gaps, which were quite large. It "sort of" worked, but there are still some gaps and the handle still wiggles just a little. When I get to it, I'll knock the handle out and try again, but will try to pre-heat the head more and get it a lot hotter, so the lead will flow into the voids better. I may just try heating it enough to anneal it. Other than the loose handle and difficulty sharpening, it's not a bad looking tomahawk.

The second one from Cabelas, however, is shaped like a tomahawk a cartoon Indian would carry. It's ridiculous. The other thing is not just that the handle is a poor fit... It's not even close. There is no way the standard handle that came with that head can be made to fit it. That head is a mess.

If you are determined to pay the least possible, I would suggest that you go to an event and paw through some vendor's supply to pick out a good one. You may get a real bargain. If you need to buy sight unseen, I would order one from a reputable blacksmith or dealer and pay his price. If I had done that, I could have gotten a nice tomahawk for the price I paid for the two that are virtually unusable.

If I were to do it over, I would order a throwing tomahawk from Beaver Bill Keeler right at the git-go. I eventually bought a special-order trade axe from him that he made to my specifications for the same price as his regular throwing tomahawks. I bought one of his scalping knives, too. Bill is a full-time blacksmith specializing in 17th and 18th century edged weapons, and his work is top-notch. Check out his tomahawks here: Beaver Bill Forging Works His website is worth a look even if you don't buy anything.

Notchy Bob
 

RSbilliard

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A friend of mine from work bought a couple of hawks from chas. Townsend's on line store. He said that they were both good throwers for $25.00 plus s&h.
 

kje54

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Crazy Crow has imported hawks that are very functional and handles are available too. They are hand forged with some arc welding that doesn't show too. The handles are very plain but can be stained or painted.

I picked up a Crazy Crow French hawk, took hours of filing to get the handle to fit almost snugly. Should have returned it like I've returned half of what I bought from them. I typically avoid CC any more, when one has returned over half of the stuff purchased from them then one decides to do business elsewhere if one is smart.
 

rp77469

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I bought my H&B hawk in the late 70's. They forged them with a thinner blade than they do today. I would not trade it for the world. It sticks in everything, and still chops kindling in camp.
 

Notchy Bob

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I bought my H&B hawk in the late 70's. They forged them with a thinner blade than they do today. I would not trade it for the world. It sticks in everything, and still chops kindling in camp.
That's an interesting observation. Styles change, I reckon.

Beaver Bill (see the link to his website in post #7) offers a model with a thinner blade in his lineup of tomahawks for throwing. I can see how one of these, especially with a wide bevel at the cutting edge, might "stick" more easily than a thicker one.

Notchy Bob
 

Many Klatch

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An Estwing shingling hatchet throws good, is indestructible and costs around $30. It's not acceptable at Primitive events but if you are practicing at home who cares.
 

Rató:rats

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My first hawk was the Frontier Hawk by Coldsteel. Drop forged in Taiwan. Pretty indestructible for 30$ and the handle is comfy, not an extreme taper like you’ll find on some. A good entry-level thrower.
 

Whisper

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I’ve been buying from Hatchets and Axes. The prices are fair and they have handles.
Here is a picture of one that I dressed up.
BBDC64D8-CE9B-4C42-A52A-69B1CB3DF81E.jpeg

 

griffiga

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Here’s one looks to be decent. There are a few more on the site for less money and some for more.
BCB6DE66-F4B6-439F-873E-1706EFACC9D9.png
 
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flintlockrb

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I agree with you a
I think it's sort of hit or miss with the cheap imported tomahawks. I've bought two from Cabelas, thinking to save some money. The ones I got were extremely hard and difficult to sharpen. On one, the handle was a poor fit. I decided not to throw it but to try to fix it up for a camp axe. I melted lead and poured it in the eye around the handle to fill the gaps, which were quite large. It "sort of" worked, but there are still some gaps and the handle still wiggles just a little. When I get to it, I'll knock the handle out and try again, but will try to pre-heat the head more and get it a lot hotter, so the lead will flow into the voids better. I may just try heating it enough to anneal it. Other than the loose handle and difficulty sharpening, it's not a bad looking tomahawk.

The second one from Cabelas, however, is shaped like a tomahawk a cartoon Indian would carry. It's ridiculous. The other thing is not just that the handle is a poor fit... It's not even close. There is no way the standard handle that came with that head can be made to fit it. That head is a mess.

If you are determined to pay the least possible, I would suggest that you go to an event and paw through some vendor's supply to pick out a good one. You may get a real bargain. If you need to buy sight unseen, I would order one from a reputable blacksmith or dealer and pay his price. If I had done that, I could have gotten a nice tomahawk for the price I paid for the two that are virtually unusable.

If I were to do it over, I would order a throwing tomahawk from Beaver Bill Keeler right at the git-go. I eventually bought a special-order trade axe from him that he made to my specifications for the same price as his regular throwing tomahawks. I bought one of his scalping knives, too. Bill is a full-time blacksmith specializing in 17th and 18th century edged weapons, and his work is top-notch. Check out his tomahawks here: Beaver Bill Forging Works His website is worth a look even if you don't buy anything.

Notchy Bob
I agree with you about Beaver Bill - he is a true craftsman & his prices are well worth the quality!!!1
 
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