improving my "new" '58 Remington?

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tom in nc

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I've been reading up on Remingtons since I was fortunate enough to find my Pietta last week. I understand that one common modification done is to create grooves for lubrication on the spindle the cylinder revolves on. I'm reluctant to start filing on mine and certainly don't want to "cut" more than needed. I wonder about using a thread cutting die, one bigger than the actual size that normally fits, so to cut shallow, undersize (or would they be oversize) threads? I would prefer whatever I do to at least look like it might have been "factory", or at least done by someone who knew what they were doing. What do you think? Is it even necessary, since the Pietta has a flat bottom on the round spindle?
 
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Redstick Lee

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those "grooves" actually make a nice spot for sticky fouling to settle in.....i'd lightly polish the arbor pin & otherwise leave that part alone.
 

Scota@4570

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Mine was binding slightly. After removing about 0.001" in the correct places cylinder binding stopped. When reloading take a second to pull the pin and put a drop of oil on it. Filing grooves in it is a mistake. Filing grooves would just make a mess of it and weaken it.

The grooves are for colt arbors. They are about .43" in diameter. There is surface area to spare. The Remington one are about 1/4" in diameter. Perhaps someone is mixing up the two guns?
 

Gee Dog

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+1 on White Lithium Grease.

Using a petroleum based oil on the cylinder pin is a big mistake. Never do that.
 

SDSmlf

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I've been reading up on Remingtons since I was fortunate enough to find my Pietta last week. I understand that one common modification done is to create grooves for lubrication on the spindle the cylinder revolves on. I'm reluctant to start filing on mine and certainly don't want to "cut" more than needed. I wonder about using a thread cutting die, one bigger than the actual size that normally fits, so to cut shallow, undersize (or would they be oversize) threads? I would prefer whatever I do to at least look like it might have been "factory", or at least done by someone who knew what they were doing. What do you think? Is it even necessary, since the Pietta has a flat bottom on the round spindle?
Have you shot your ‘new’ 58 Remington yet? If not, just lube the cylinder pin with the lubricant of your choice and see how it shoots. You may be pleasantly surprised.

When I was playing around in SASS, I went to the local trading post (think Dollar Store) and got a 1990s PC plastic spray bottle. Filled that bottle with moose milk, and found a quick spray through the cylinder pin hole (with cylinder out of the pistol) and another quick squirt on the cylinder pin followed by a quick wipe down, would keep the 58s running. Typical match would likely shoot six cylinders full through two separate pistols, total of sixty shots.
 

hawkeye2

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+1 on White Lithium Grease.

Using a petroleum based oil on the cylinder pin is a big mistake. Never do that.
lithium grease is a petroleum product. It consists of a lithium soap base and oil. Grease consists of the base oil (petroleum except in very rare applications), a thickener (lithium in this case) and additives. The oil is 80% to 97% by weight of the product. The lithium thickener is like a sponge holding the oil in place till it's needed. Petroleum products are a problem when subject to the temperature of combustion in the chambers and barrel. Outside of there they aren't a problem.
 

Woodnbow

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I have no experience to speak of with the Remington revolvers. I’ve owned two of them. But a wipe with a damp rag or a spritz with your cleaning solution seems to work. They are more prone to fouling of the cylinder pin than Colts or the Ruger but it’s easily remedied.
Other than that, shoot the gun for a while, it may not need any “improvement”. Quite often they don’t.
 
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I've been reading up on Remingtons since I was fortunate enough to find my Pietta last week. I understand that one common modification done is to create grooves for lubrication on the spindle the cylinder revolves on. I'm reluctant to start filing on mine and certainly don't want to "cut" more than needed. I wonder about using a thread cutting die, one bigger than the actual size that normally fits, so to cut shallow, undersize (or would they be oversize) threads? I would prefer whatever I do to at least look like it might have been "factory", or at least done by someone who knew what they were doing. What do you think? Is it even necessary, since the Pietta has a flat bottom on the round spindle?
Just bought both 2019 marked Pietta Rem.Army 44 and Uberti Navy 36 2019. No cylinder pin sticking or other issues unlike my older models. Better quality overall. Little tuning needed compared to older models. So far the .44 25yd. match load is 10g Goex 3f, fill with corn meal to top wipe off excess, .454 ball loaded just under flush with rammer on gun,lube with 4 to 1 crisco/beeswax under 55f or 3 to 1 above 55f covering top of ball. This load is giving me the same winning scores as any good match load at 25yds...50yds 15g Goex great results also...
 

Loyalist Dave

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+1 on White Lithium Grease.
+2 on the "White Grease"
A lot of the lads use it on the internals of the musket lock on the Bess, and I've used it on my 1858 Remington, for the cylinder. Especially at Cowboy Action Shooting matches, where I was shooting 30 or more rounds through it with BP cartridges. I also used it on .44 Colt copies for the cylinder.

Two things..., the grease was thick enough to prevent the fouling from going too far into the gap between the cylinder and the shaft around which the cylinder(s) rotated. Second, where the stuff is it shows when powder residue is getting into areas. This was good for the musket locks too, as it helped folks identify when the lock wasn't flush and tight against the barrel, and kept moisture out as well.

LD
 

sawyer04

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Grease the arbor with White Lithium Grease and you will be able to shoot longer without the cylinder binding.
I just use regular chassis grease, never had any binding. Has worked for 40 years. Unlike the new fancy revolvers of today the old Colts and Remington's were made in the day of horse travel and dusty conditions. They were wiped down and checked daily. I tear them down once a year, clean, grease, check for worn or about ready to break parts and reassemble for another year. I carry on the farm everyday I am about, cutting logs, on a tractor, or just trekking. I have carried one for up to seven months loaded and it has fired as good as it was freshly loaded. The secret, keep your powder and caps dry. Caps go soft in wet and humid air if not careful.
 
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