How Often Are "Remington" Marked Barrels Seen On Completed Percussion Rifles?

Discussion in 'Percussion Rifles' started by victorio1sw, May 16, 2019.

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  1. May 16, 2019 #1

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

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    This rifle has a 34" octagon barrel that is 1" across the flats. Rear of barrel is stamped "Remington". Rifled bore measures 0.365" land to land. Lock is marked "Warren & Steele, Albany". Fancy DST's. Brass buttplate, toe plate, patchbox, trigger guard, and rear thimble are scroll engraved. That rear brass thimble has been hit by a returning ramrod so many times that the front portion is gone. Patchbox is hinged downward. The left cheek piece is inlaid with a German silver hog, and the barrel key escutcheon is also German silver. Fore end cap is pewter. Barrel rib includes two steel thimbles. The 5/16" ramrod is missing, but it will "tag bottom" inside the stock at a point even with the breach plug.

    The breach plug tang at one time was equipped with a screwed-in peep sight. Both barrel sights are incorrect replacements.

    This gun needs some work to restore to original appearance.

    Can anyone out there show pictures of other Remington rifles?
     

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    Last edited: May 16, 2019
  2. May 16, 2019 #2

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

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    Remington was a barrel supplier. Doesn’t mean the gun was made at the Remington factory in Ilion, NY. Nice rifle.
     
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  3. May 16, 2019 #3

    plmeek

    plmeek

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    As Rich said, during the 2nd quarter of the 19th century, Remington & Sons were primarily a barrel manufacture. Towards the middle of the century, they started making military long arms, but they don't seem to have made muzzleloader rifles for the civilian market.

    Their barrels received widespread distribution and Charles Hanson in The Plains Rifle included a phrase common in the collecting circles of the 1950s and 1960s, namely, "Backwoods gunsmiths seem eventually to have settled upon a regular component list for their rifles: barrel by Remington, lock by Golcher, and fittings by Tryon." This seemed to sum up how frequently collectors encountered rifles made with these components.

    Your rifle is likely a target rifle of post-1850 manufacture. More knowledgeable people may recognize the area it was made by the unique style of trigger guard, stock architecture, and decoration, but I would guess New York or a New England state.
     
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  4. May 17, 2019 #4

    Gene L

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    Warren & Steele, Albany, the manufacturer, is on the web. Google the name and you'll see examples of their work and the distinctive trigger guard.
     
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  5. May 17, 2019 #5

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

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    Yes, I have seen the Warren & Steele enterprise as listed in several books on early gun makers. I had assumed that Warren & Steele actually made (assembled) this rifle, unless Warren & Steele also sold their locks to other gunsmiths.

    Thanks for your reply.
     
  6. May 17, 2019 #6

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

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    Thanks for your reply with this information. I know that Remington celebrated their 200th anniversary recently, and this legacy mostly began with barrel manufacture.
     
  7. May 19, 2019 #7

    viking2

    viking2

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    I have a percussion rifle with a Remington barrel that I assume was made in the 1850s.
    It is the only Remington barrel I have seen. However, it's possible that many of them have
    the Remington name on the bottom of the barrel so it can't be seen.
     
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  8. May 19, 2019 #8

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

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    .

    Thanks for your reply.

    I had heard that many times "Remington" was on the bottom of the barrel. I guess it depended on whether the actual rifle maker thought that the Remington name would add value and appeal to his rifle.

    When I built a 50 caliber Hawken rifle in 1966, I turned "Douglass" to the bottom of that octagon barrel. Same reasoning.

    Can you add some pictures of your rifle with the Remington barrel? I have about 100 antique gun books, but was amazed to find so few pictures of rifles with Remington barrels (Flint or percussion).
     
  9. May 20, 2019 #9

    Pete44ru

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. May 20, 2019 #10

    victorio1sw

    victorio1sw

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    A very nice example! Great execution of the candy-striped rod too. I wonder, does that rifle have a hooked breach, or is the upper tang integral with the breach plug?
     

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