How many grains in a pound?

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TFoley

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Post edited for clarification of statement.
Thanks, deerstalkert. "Granules" was the appropriate word I was looking for.

wm
I get that you mean 'how many individual granules of 3Fg powder are there in a pound'. At least it shows that the spirit of scientific investigation coupled with an enquiring mind are not yet dead. It reminds me a lot of a question my then-five y/o granddaughter asked me at about this time of year - 'how many leaves are there on an ordinary tree?'

We'll look forward to hearing back from you some time in early March, then?

Nothwithstanding, it might help to count out the average number in 1 gr, and multiply that by 7000. A lot quicker, too, if you are in a rush to know. :)
 
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7,000 grains to a pound is absolutely the answer. Confusion ensues when you leave out the disclaimer "equivalent volume".
 
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Well if you math is up to it. Carefully determine the volume of the powder cans internal dimension, the part that the powder occupies. Use the same formula the manufacturer uses to determine the grain line on your favorite powder measure and mark the container accordingly, voila, your answer.
 

OhioHawkeye

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Once again we have conflicting information about weight & volume measuring. A Grain is a Grain & a Pound is a Pound & they are both defined in absolute terms. Trying to equate volume measure to definitive weight measures is absurd & will always invite confusion. There are 7000 grains (and grains are definitively defined) to a pound ......
YUP.. and the OP answered his own question correctly.

Ideally, when you make your powder measure, it is by volume used at the range to sight in the load for the particular gun....
At home, use a non digital balance beam scale to properly determine what the grain (by weight) measurement is for that load and type of powder. Then mark the powder measure accordingly or make a new one for that gun.

Those who use the expensive trash brass powder measures, notice that from one to the other and from one brand to the other, there is much difference in the actual load they produce. They are meant for a general guide only to get started. They are not the do all/end all for powder measure. That is why it is always the best practice to work up a load and make a measure for each gun separately if target shooting.

I do more hunting, and my weight measured, powder measure made from a reed works for several guns and is on my Possibles bag constantly. The other measures are in the hunting bag for the gun with the shot, wads, ball etc. as needed. Yes, I carry two bags, a possibles bag and a shooting or hunting bag. My powder horn hangs separately as I use several different ones depending on task and volume needs.
 

excess650

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I think that was pathfinders original question anyway.:ghostly:
He clarified and pointed out how many shots to expect from a can. Literal 70gr charges would make for 100 shots, but the volumetric weight might be 65gr or 75gr, so cold be 106 or 93 respectively.

Likewise, he needs to weigh HIS powder from HIS measure, for HIS answer. I have multiple measures that don't agree on volume.
 

ZUG

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How do you think that the manufactures of ALL those powder measures out in the world were marked with the powder amounts on them? Do you really believe that someone counted out the granules for each graduations that are on them first before marking them? Come on get real -- ALL powder measures were marked by the weight of powder using a powder scale -- prove me wrong :rolleyes: :ghostly::dunno::ThankYou:
 
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Correct a grain is a weight measure that must be verified on a scale when charging with a volumetric measure. If a shooter is consistent in the process of loading, the difference between volume and weight is negligible for the same powder batch. Switch lots, brands, granulation or altering charging procedure, and powder charge will require recalibration on a scale. Likewise powder from the upper part of a can will measure different from powder from the bottom. The fines (4F) settle toward the bottom. From distances under 150 yards strict accuracy (+/- 3grn) in powder measuring has little affect on POI. Extend to 300 yard and then one will see a need to have consistent velocities for a given weight of bullet.
 

Old Hawkeye

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39 posts in less than 19 hours!! Amazing! All over the undisputed fact that there are 7000 grains (the unit of weight, not granules) in a pound of powder. Should make my prediction of 100 posts tomorrow sometime. Who knows where it will end.
 
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