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How long does it take you to clean your rifle/smoothbore?

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Bruce Evans

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About a month ago I was in a BP shotgun event at my local club. After the day's shooting, I saw one guy over in the loading area cleaning his shotgun. Full disclosure, it was a superposed breech loading conversion, I think a Browning. He was very meticulous, so I asked him how long he spent cleaning his gun and how often he did it.

About two hours. Every day.
 

Art Caputo

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Cleaning time is generally dependent on the amount of shooting(residue), and the particular rifle. I’d say an average time of 30 minutes. I probably spend as much time cleaning and replenishing my supplies and accessories then the actual cleaning time of the rifle. I also confess to having always been a “cleaning/maintenance nut” with firearms and associated equipment.
 

Robby

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I'm not sure but I'd say most days, probably between ten and twenty minutes, now on Sundays, I take my time and have a beer or two, or....................., could take hours.
Robby
 

Loyalist Dave

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If I don’t completely disassemble the lock internals about 20 minutes. Maintaining fine tools is part of the pleasure of owning them.
AGREED !

For me it's 30 minutes, but...,

20 minutes to clean today...
five minutes to run a dry patch down the barrel followed by a second patch with oil/rust preventative on the following day...,
five minutes to run a dry patch down the barrel followed by a second patch with oil/rust preventative on the third day...,
Now she's ready to sit for a while ;)

LD
 

Carbon 6

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Every gun is different, but there is more to it than just speed. Take the work and disorganization out of it and you'll cut your time in half or more.
Wipe between shots and when it comes time to clean there won't be much to clean. Think of it as progressive cleaning.
Works for me.
 
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I am a newbie and found the times interesting. I am much slower, still coming up with a system. My question is in cleaning the lock, I saw running under hose mentioned. It's ok to run it under water or in a bucket? I have a Pedersoli and the lock is a little different. Trying to figure out how to clean it thoroughly, relatively fast and make sure it's dry?
 

flinter1977

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Cleaning one gun may take longer than another . It takes me as long as it takes to get them clean and do a good job.
 

tenngun

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If my lock is dirty, and after I’ve shot the gun multi times without I disassemble the lock for cleaning. Routinely I use wetted patches and wipe the inside. Then dry till I think it’s dry then dry it some more. Then I like to use WD40 as its a water displacer. Then dry again and use an oil on it.
Locks get a little smoke in them, and it wipes off easily. In flintlocks you get more then percussion. And percussion is exposed to less smoke then a flint. My locks inside is not browned or blued, they are shiny steal. And it’s pretty easy to see how clean it is.
To each their own but I find it easier to dry when not put under running water.
In over forty years of shooting ML I’ve never found rust on the inside of a lock.
 

EC121

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I am a newbie and found the times interesting. I am much slower, still coming up with a system. My question is in cleaning the lock, I saw running under hose mentioned. It's ok to run it under water or in a bucket? I have a Pedersoli and the lock is a little different. Trying to figure out how to clean it thoroughly, relatively fast and make sure it's dry?
Water and a toothbrush will take the fouling right off. It is particulate. It isn't bonded to the metal. I run it under cold water from my well faucet. Then blow it dry with that canned keyboard cleaning air or my air compressor. Spray it with Barricade. Then start on the barrel. When I reassemble the rifle I grease the contact points with grease on a toothpick.
 

garypl

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@10-15 minutes. Plug vent hole, spray Ballistol/water mixture down barrel and let sit for 5 minutes, dump barrel, run a few patches down barrel and oil. Wipe down lock, oil and done.
 

Grenadier1758

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I am a newbie and found the times interesting. I am much slower, still coming up with a system. My question is in cleaning the lock, I saw running under hose mentioned. It's ok to run it under water or in a bucket? I have a Pedersoli and the lock is a little different. Trying to figure out how to clean it thoroughly, relatively fast and make sure it's dry?
The water and toothbrush will take care of the particulate fouling. Whether the water is supplied from a running tap or scrubbed and rinsed in a bucket, both methods are fine. The drying of the lock is important. Use of compressed air to blow the water away will blow water from most of the nooks and crannies in the lock and speed up the drying. The Pedersoli lock isn't that much different from anyone else's lock. After the lock has been dried be sure to lubricate the lock with a rust inhibiting lubricant and apply a little bit of grease on the parts that slide on each other. Such as the toe of the frizzen the toe of mainspring, the sear spring the nose of the sear and the touching areas of the trigger lever and the sear.
 

ord sgt

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There are two different cleanings. First is the quick job to get the bore clean to prevent rust. This is for the everyday shooting. Then there is the end of season, deep cleaning before putting the firearm away for longer storage.
Anywhere between 15 minutes and an hour. The hour involves lock disassembly and deep cleaning of all parts. Everything gets a good cleaning to remove all powder fouling.
The 15 minutes is just a bore cleaning and a lock and stock wipe down.
 
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Thank you for the responses. I seem to be getting quite a bit of powder residue behind the lock, not bad, but more than at first. Any trick to getting it sealed up better?
 

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