How long do you let your powder sit in the bore between sits?

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11Bravo

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Something Eddie Southgate brought up is important for all here to remember. Him seeing the leather between hammer and nipple and knowing his Dad he checked. If anyone buys an original they should check for a loaded barrel. My first buy was a SxS that I checked and the left barrel had two charges in it. Turns out that was common as you load both barrels, go out and fire just the right barrel. Get home, forget about it and the next time you go out load both barrels as you forgot the left still had a charge.
 

bubba.50

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Greetings all. As you can tell by my post count, I'm a new member and new to muzzleloading. Son and I have put the percussion .50 c through the paces and I'm feeling pretty good 100 yards out. So this season, I plan on trying my luck at a whitetail with it. I got one with an inline last year @ about 50 yards and I'm experienced with whitetail.

So this leads me to my question--often during season I do a morning and afternoon sit. With a muzzleloader--how long can powder sit in the barrel? I planned on removing the cap and safely stowing the rifle until the afternoon (or maybe even the next morning). Since powder season is late December, I'm not 'too' worried about humidity damping the powder.

I'd certainly welcome any experience here, thanks!
If the gun is clean I leave it til I need it or the end of huntin' season, whichever comes first.
 

Eric Krewson

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Rem oil is a lousy lube for protecting a muzzle loader bore, I found out the hard way.

Every one does it different but now I use plain water followed by WD-40 squirted down the bore to get any water that my dry patches might have missed after scrub with water. I dry the WD-40 out of the bore and use one more patch soaked in Barricade, done deal.

With my first flintlock I cleaned it very well and left Rem oil in the bore to protect it. I got the gun out 6 months later and found the bore looked like a red potato patch, it was rusted and pitted. I cleaned it up as well as I could but it still had pits that can be seen in the bore picture.

Snapshot000001.jpg
 

RyanGeiler

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Appreciate all the replies! I'll leave her loaded with a safety tag on it, bore covered for humidity and change out the primer between stalks. Now hopefully a whitetail accommodates me this coming year!

Thanks again,

Ryan
 

William Lincoln

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Keeping water-moisture out of the bore/chamber is key. I have seen guys use baloons finger cots or condoms to
cover the muzzle til go time. On revolvers you can try bore butter on chamber mouths, but it is not stiff enough and will get runny on a hot day. But if you intend to keep your revolver loaded pack the chamber ends with a tallow-beeswax mix that will seal out water, prevent any
chain fire and add some lubrication. Remember that when you fire a load, that the barrel or cylinder heats up and bore butter becomes bore-water. If you are going to shoot all
that you have loaded at the range, bore butter is an Ok
option BUT if you are going to maybe fire a round when
needed or store it loaded--a beeswax type BP lube is best.
 
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Christophero

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Bore Butter has been fine for lubing conical bullets for 34 years, in my rifles. But I nearly bought the hype about it seasoning the bore and not needing to clean between shooting sessions. Tested that for a couple days and found out quick that was bogus. I never use it for storage, only lubing the grease grooves or patches because it is handy.
I either clean with hot water and dish soap or straight rubbing alcohol. Turn the barrel upside down to dry, lube with a light oil and store. Yes, I do pop a cap or two off before loading and after swabbing the bore with a clean, dry cloth.
 

MtnMan

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I never used BB but i've heard guys say it hardens up in cold weather.
 

Sidney Smith

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Bore butter does indeed get hard in cold weather and will crumble right out of bore grooves in maxi balls. I've even bought them brand new(before I bought a maxi mold), they must've sat on the shelf for a long time, and the BB crumbled away and had to be replaced.

As I've said before, BB is fine as a patch lube if used quickly, and not stored for a long time where air can dry it out. As a bore protectant though it sucks.
 

Fisher 2021

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One key thing I’ve found to not do is to bring the gun into a heated vehicle or dwelling if it is cold while hunting. Condensation on the powder can prevent the gun from firing.
Placing the gun in a gun case allows the gun to warm up slowly helps.
 
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Brokennock

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One key thing I’ve found to not do is to bring the gun into a heated vehicle or dwelling if it is cold while hunting. Condensation on the powder can prevent the gun from firing.
Placing the gun in a gun case allows the gun to warm up slowly helps.
Funny, I read this condensation thing all the time. Our muzzleloading deer season is end of December here, my gun makes many trips from loaded in the house, to truck, to hunting, back into truck, back into house, repeat, sometimes a few times a week for a couple weeks. I have never, ever, had this problem.
The only time I've ever had an ignition problem with a flintlock left loaded this way was when the wooden skewer I used to plug the touchhole broke off in the hole and the only way to clear it was to push it into the powder. I attacked it with a tiny drill bit to try to break it up, but, that apparently wasn't enough.

If the powder goes in dry, into a dry barrel, and the ball/patch or ball/wad combo is tight enough, and one keeps the flash hole or nipple sealed when not in use, capped or pan sealed when primed, how does moisture gain access to condense?
 

OhioHawkeye

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.... With a muzzleloader--how long can powder sit in the barrel? I planned on removing the cap and safely stowing the rifle until the afternoon .....
First, welcome here.

I've heard of rounds years old still firing....
That being said, I normally use a spit patch, but also use prelubed patches without change in sight picture. Hunting, I use the lubed patches.
I leave them in all week if necessary. I do check with the ramrod before going into the woods to be sure the ball is seated, and again at least once midday. (Hilly terrain to navigate. It gets bumped, and I'm paranoidabout it)

I just make sure I dump the pan and place a frizzen cover on it and wrap with a cows knee before putting in the truck. Next day check ball seat, picking the lock and re-priming at the truck.
 

OhioHawkeye

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One key thing I’ve found to not do is to bring the gun into a heated vehicle or dwelling if it is cold while hunting. Condensation on the powder can prevent the gun from firing.
Placing the gun in a gun case allows the gun to warm up slowly helps.

Absolutely. I'm lucky and can just leave it in the truck.
 

Sidney Smith

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I leave my gun in its case and out in the garage on a table. I leave it there for the whole season if need be or until I fire the gun. Going from cold to warm will definitely increase the chances of condensation buildup.
 

Brokennock

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I guess no ever told my guns or powder it wasn't supposed to work after going in and out of the house with a powder charge in it during winter.

I'll make sure they don't get the memo...
 

Sidney Smith

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You do that. It's your gun. When the buck of a lifetime is in your sights and the gun goes fffft, and that's it, then you go f#%&..... Then get back to us.
 

Brokennock

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At least 20 December muzzleloading seasons, several November/December shotgun seasons once they allowed muzzleloading guns to participate,, don't know how many turkey seasons fall and spring, nor how many squirrel hunts or plain old scouts,,,, only the one ignition problem,,,,, ever. Which was clearly not condensation, or any other kind of moisture, related.

No seems to be able to explain how this moisture gets behind the ball into the powder where it magically becomes condensation and fouls one's powder.
 

William Lincoln

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What may well happen is that the caps got ruined. If you take a
cold gun into a warm moist place, like a kitchen with cooking
going on , you would get condensation on the outside--just like
a glass of ice tea. And that might affect a cap. It should not affect
the powder unless it was totally exposed. My thoughts only.
 
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