Horn kits?

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I've been working out of a powder flask and like to get a horn, I think it would be nice to build the horn from a kit or something. Are there any good kits out there, I don't mind if there a lot of work, especially if I can save some money.

So what kit would you recommend, or is it better to piece together the stuff to build a horn. Also I know they are all shapes and sizes and curves, is there a better shape I am a big guy so I would think that may matter.

thanks.
 

Ames

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The horned toad says we should go to Mexico.
Well, the kits are LESS work. That's the general idea behind them.
First you need to decide if you carry left or carry right. Insert no jokes here, people. Focus. You also don't need a 22" horn for a pound of powder. Medium will be good for a start. Then, if you go with a kit they will send you a end plug that is kinda sorta going to fit. Get out the files. You want it tight, and set in beeswax for an airtight seal to keep your powder dry. Then pin it.
Plus a stopper, most likely a fiddle peg. To get a good fit in the hole you need a tapered reamer, about $15.
When all is said and done you will learn a lot from the kit. And then move beyond it for the next horn, and the next..................
Depends on your woodworking skills to make the next plug yourself. Your desire to have a custom strap woven just for your horn ($35). Try to age it with dye? I shy away from it. Always looks artificial unless you are REAL good.
Scrimshaw opens up a whole new chapter.
I would say go for it to get your feet wet. Then, challenge yourself with the next one. Its flat out fun. Whatever you make its like your guns. YOU made it and it feels pretty good hanging on your shoulder in the woods.
 

mooman76

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I bought some cheap powder horns on ebay. The more you buy, the cheaper they are. The reason I got them is to practice scrimshaw on so when I make a horn. Just food for thought.
 
Joined
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Orange county new York.
Well, the kits are LESS work. That's the general idea behind them.
First you need to decide if you carry left or carry right. Insert no jokes here, people. Focus. You also don't need a 22" horn for a pound of powder. Medium will be good for a start. Then, if you go with a kit they will send you a end plug that is kinda sorta going to fit. Get out the files. You want it tight, and set in beeswax for an airtight seal to keep your powder dry. Then pin it.
Plus a stopper, most likely a fiddle peg. To get a good fit in the hole you need a tapered reamer, about $15.
When all is said and done you will learn a lot from the kit. And then move beyond it for the next horn, and the next..................
Depends on your woodworking skills to make the next plug yourself. Your desire to have a custom strap woven just for your horn ($35). Try to age it with dye? I shy away from it. Always looks artificial unless you are REAL good.
Scrimshaw opens up a whole new chapter.
I would say go for it to get your feet wet. Then, challenge yourself with the next one. Its flat out fun. Whatever you make its like your guns. YOU made it and it feels pretty good hanging on your shoulder in the woods.
I have a basic idea on how to make the horn, maybe the stopper maybe harder but I've made stoppers out of work for other things and nothing hard. The wood plug should be easy to make, I have a piece of curly maple that checked on me so don't think I'll get a stock blank so it's scrape now.

I think I'd like to carry left, tho I'm right handed I feel better pouring with my left hand.the scrimshaw would be cool one day, I have a idea to make one with a map of the area I hunt.

I think if I can just get a horn I can make the rest, I believe they need to be cleaned out and maybe shortened. Making the pour spout I'd have to figure how it's done, but think I can manage.
 

oldwood

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Crazy Crow trading post has kits on line , and , raw horns , that you supply the plug,and stopper. Most old powder horns on the frontier were plugged w/pine or other soft light wood. Plugs were anchored w/ small wooden pegs , or tiny wire nails. Warm up a piece of bee's wax and seal any gaps around the plug by just scraping the warm soft wax cake across them .
There are many illustrated books out there that describe the building process of drilling the hole for the stopper , filing the outside of the horn and installing the shoulder strap .. How you personalize the outside of the horn is up to you.................oldwood
 

oreclan

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Crazy Crow trading post has kits on line , and , raw horns , that you supply the plug,and stopper. Most old powder horns on the frontier were plugged w/pine or other soft light wood. Plugs were anchored w/ small wooden pegs , or tiny wire nails. Warm up a piece of bee's wax and seal any gaps around the plug by just scraping the warm soft wax cake across them .
There are many illustrated books out there that describe the building process of drilling the hole for the stopper , filing the outside of the horn and installing the shoulder strap .. How you personalize the outside of the horn is up to you.................oldwood
Crazy Crow is going out of business.
Powder horns and More have excellent horns. Pay attention to how you want to carry (wear) your horn. Originally the horn cut from the cow's (etc.) right side of the head was considered for right hand carry. Now many people, not me, like to wear a left horn on the right side. Just pay close attention to the overhead view of the horn, not the description.
 

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