HMS Victory Fires Full Broadside!

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mikee51848

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Claypipe said:
Actually, they may be heavier than that. The HMS Victory, which sank in 1744 and was recently re-discovered, had 110 bronze guns. At least, one of her guns was a 42 pounder.

Article on Times Online
Are we talking about more than one "Victory"? The timeline article has it sinking in 1744. Another post has it fighting at Trafalgar in 1805?
 

Zoar

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I'd like to see a TRUE Broadside by a ship. The one at a time cannon shooting on this YouTube was appreciated but not the BROADSIDE I'd like to see.
 

bingo1952

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She may not have stood to the recoil of all those heavy caliber guns fired at once. You fire your guns as they come to bear not as the ship comes to bear. If you waited until the ships were in perfect alignment your opponent would shoot you to pieces.
 

Flint62Smoothie

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I tell you, I worked near Portsmouth, England for about 1/2-a year and the historic navy yard was my favorite place. That Victory tour was the BEST of any ship I've ever been on.

The pictures show the gun deck below the open air gun deck. 286 men lived, ate, worked, and slept on that deck. The men would sneak ladies on board, only to be found out whilst out to sea. She'd have a baby, no one knew who the Dad was, so that's where the term "Son of a Gun" came from.

Times were tough in the 1700s,n never knowing where your next meal came from. Serving in the Royal Navy would guarantee you 3 meals a day, though many times the food would be spoiled with bowevills (sp?) and other vermin. The plates were square, called a trencher, hence the term "3 'square' meals a day".

The deck below the bottom-most gundeck is the orlop deck, which is derived from Danish or Swedish to mean the overlap deck. The heightof this deck was driven by the heights of the decks above and the hold storage below and most times it was barely 5' tall. This is also where the wounded would be taken.

To date, it remains THE most fascinating historical tour I have ever taken!
 

Coot

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WildatHeart said:
Claypipe said:
Actually, they may be heavier than that. The HMS Victory, which sank in 1744 and was recently re-discovered, had 110 bronze guns. At least, one of her guns was a 42 pounder.

Article on Times Online
Are we talking about more than one "Victory"? The timeline article has it sinking in 1744. Another post has it fighting at Trafalgar in 1805?
Yes, these are two different ships. There have been 5-6 ships named "Victory" in the Royal Navy. I say 5 or 6 because one was badly burned & then so heavily rebuilt that many say it was actually a new ship. The first Victory was in 1559 and the 6th (or 5th if you prefer) is at Portsmouth today. It was the 5th (if we are saying 6 ships) that sank & was recently discovered.
 

threepdr

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Mule,

Is'nt that aboard the HMS Warrior instead of the Victory? I visited both last September.

I can see the rack of Parker-Hale P58 Enfields in the background.
 

Mulebrain

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threepdr said:
Mule,

Is'nt that aboard the HMS Warrior instead of the Victory? I visited both last September.

I can see the rack of Parker-Hale P58 Enfields in the background.
You know what, I went on both and didn't even remember which one it was :youcrazy:

I got my pictures mixed up, and need to organize them!
 

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