History of my local area I never knew

Discussion in 'General Reenacting Discussions' started by Leadball loader, Nov 22, 2019.

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  1. Nov 22, 2019 #1

    Leadball loader

    Leadball loader

    Leadball loader

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    I retired three years ago and became aware that I had missed a hundred years of history of the region I have lived in my entire life. Except for the start of the Revolution I had focused on action out of New England and as I began to read of the early history of the area I have learned about a very interesting era of history.
    The struggle for control of Maine was as violent and interesting as that of the central and southern regions. I was pretty much unaware of most of it.
    For the last few years I have gained a great interest in the influence of French and English colonial struggle,especially of French influence in flintlock muskets here.
    Shooting a gun that was commonly in use by those settling here has become a great deal of fun and influenced me to try a bit of re-enacting.
    There is a great deal to delve into still.
     
    Pete G, DaveC, rshveyda and 4 others like this.
  2. Nov 23, 2019 #2

    blackhorse

    blackhorse

    blackhorse

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    I owned a house in Sycamore Ohio back over 20 years ago. Between Sycamore and Upper Sandusky on Rt 67 there was supposed to have been a British Trading Post around the time of the F & I War. There was a Wyandot Village near by. I used to fish in the Sandusky River and British warships were known to be at the mouth of the river in Lake Erie. I was able to locate where the village was supposed to have been which is now a very prosperous farm. The history was rich in that area.
     
    NW Territory Woodsman likes this.
  3. Nov 24, 2019 #3

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

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    About thirty miles from me was an Osage Village. It was on the top of a hill. Around as one looks you could see Lisa trading post and in another direction Charbanos place, and in far distance over the horizon Nathan Boone’s place. They all traded with the folks on that hill.
     
  4. Nov 24, 2019 #4

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

    Kansas Jake

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    I suspect we have interesting historical sites pretty close to wherever we live. If I go 40 miles south I hit the Sante Fe Tail and Council Grove. 30 miles northeast is the Oregon Trail. Just west of here is Fort Riley. Outside our timeframe but 40 miles west is Abilene KS. This is west of the Missouri and doesn’t have the early history of the eastern part of the country. Apologies to native peoples. Pre European folks there is a rebuilt earthen lodge about 100 miles from here. I could go on and on. Enjoy and study your local history.
     
    Brokennock likes this.
  5. Nov 25, 2019 #5

    Leadball loader

    Leadball loader

    Leadball loader

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    Thanks for the correction of my misspelled knew.


    Leadball loader
     
  6. Nov 25, 2019 #6

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

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    Yeah a lot of areas are like that. Lack of local history teaching, as teachers get locked into curriculum. It's not limited to pre-AWI either....
    In my area nothing happened until the ACW...at least that's how it's taught.

    We have an F&I vintage fort that has been restored, and it sits 50 minutes from my door by car.
    Maryland had "rangers" that operated from it in the F&I, as well as from Antietam
    Simon Kenton was born an hour's drive from my house...(and the location where you turn off the highway to get to Hopewell Gap Va is a place with my last name; not history.., just Twilight Zone-ish)
    Meeshack Browning was born in the town where I live.
    Congress fled DC during the War of 1812 and took shelter in the town of Brookeville, MD, 20 minutes from my house...

    LD
     
  7. Nov 25, 2019 #7

    zimmerstutzen

    zimmerstutzen

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    The history of locales can be amazing. Also the way family history can tie in. I am in the area where Cresap's war took place. Just 8 miles south of Wrightsville where the Union burned the bridge to keep Lee's Confederates from crossing the river to Lancaster. Just across the river from the Pequea Creek where a barrels were made for guns in the 1830's. (IIRC Leman) 35 miles west is Gettysburg. 90 miles east is Valley Forge. 45 miles NE is Daniel Boone's birthplace, another ten miles to the heart of where the Berks County Gunsmiths made the classic long rifles. Fulton floated his first steam boat nearby and a Columbia, PA, 10 miles NE was considered to be the Nations Capitol. 10 miles NW is York, PA, that was the Nations Capitol for a while. Across the River is where the Paxtang boys murdered innocent Indians. 45 miles North along the Susquehanna is the spot used by Girty and his river pirates to lured settlers' flatboats to shore to their murder and theft of their possessions. I live in an area where the Penns intentionally invited Scotch Irish to settle to create a buffer of fighters between the nonviolent mennonite farmers in Lancaster and the indians on the frontier. Yet there is a place nearby that shows up on early maps as Battle Hill and no one knows how it got the name.
     
  8. Nov 25, 2019 #8

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

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    Check out local libraries and little in town museums. They often have some little home made book stapled together, that was written by some local amateur historian just about the county or a little bigger.
     
    Nyckname likes this.
  9. Nov 25, 2019 #9

    nhmoose

    nhmoose

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    New England is cool. Pic is a sign along the Connecticut river just before the Ammonoosuc river.
    Rogers Rangers.jpg
     
  10. Dec 1, 2019 at 9:32 PM #10

    trent/OH

    trent/OH

    trent/OH

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    I recently read the History of Pleasant Plain Ohio, a hamlet of 150 people in Southwestern Ohio. Of the numerous locally significant mentions, I read of this fellow: "The death of an early pioneer on Dec. 8, 1847 is significant. Joseph Paxton died on that date, and was laid to rest along the old Goshen and Wilmington Pike. Paxton is said to have been a hunter and Indian scout, and was probably a transient in this area. Paxton was buried with his rifle, hunting knife, and tobacco pouch, alongside the roadway according to his request. He desired to "hear the horses and wagons pass by". The grave marker, though broken, reveals that Paxton was the son of Sam and Easter Paxton, and was born in Kentucky on June 18, 1803."
    I located and visited the grave last month, and next time I'm nearby intend to scatter some tobacco and black powder on his grave site as a reminder that he is not totally forgotten. Because of the close proximity, local history is sometimes MORE interesting than national events, and every national event is indeed a local event for someone.
     
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  11. Dec 5, 2019 at 12:17 AM #11

    spudnut

    spudnut

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    Ive always wanted to go to the scene of the bloody run bridge from Pontiacs rebellion, its located in a cemetary on the east end od Detroit.
     
  12. Dec 5, 2019 at 11:49 AM #12

    JB67

    JB67

    JB67

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    Maine in the Revolution, or F&IW? I know there was quite a bit of action in the F&I era, but Rev War battles seem to be limited to Arnold's Expedition, Revere's failed attempt to take Castine, and a naval battle off Machias.

    I'm in the Hudson Valley. Can't throw a rock w/o hitting a Rev War historical site!
     
  13. Dec 5, 2019 at 6:00 PM #13

    Dave Orchard

    Dave Orchard

    Dave Orchard

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    I found the grave of Ranald MacKenzie on a bluff just a bit upriver from a bridge that has a good canoe launch site for the 4 hour run to Curlew, Wa.
    Mackenzie was a 1/2 breed and a skilled linguist, who landed on Japan's northern islands pretending to be a castaway at a time when an intruder could be put to death.
    He wound-up teaching English to Samurai who were later interpreters when Commodore Perry showed up.

    (Fascinating man I never heard about in school ;-)

    Japanese visit his grave site and leave pebbles with their names & addresses painted on then & a few coins..
    MacKenzie's injun relations still leave tokens of their own at his grave in "the smallest state park in Wa."

    Davo
     

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