Help Please! Trying to identify...

Discussion in 'Firearm Identification' started by Dave Rodgers, Apr 3, 2019.

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  1. Apr 3, 2019 #1

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

    32 Cal

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    Hello everyone...I'm really not a firearms expert, but picked up the following muzzleloader and I'm trying to get some info on it, date it, and a rough valuation so that I can eventually sell it reasonably. I'm appealing to your wisdom and experience

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  2. Apr 3, 2019 #2

    TFoley

    TFoley

    TFoley

    62 Cal.

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    It's a London-marked percussion action fowling piece from around the eighteen-forties, when the back-action lock and the percussion system became more wide-spread among buyers. It MAY have been converted from a flintlock. However, the barrel was proofed in Birmingham. The crossed sceptres in this style were in use from 1813 to 1904. Good pictures, BTW. They help a lot.
     
  3. Apr 3, 2019 #3

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    45 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    Dave, it resembles a gun brought in for repairs back in the '80s that had a cherry stock and long barrel. It had been badly broken at the wrist. It was dated 1831 and was probably a 'made from spare parts' gun. As I recall it was 16 guage, American. It had that large 'flat' checkering on the wrist, and Mr. Miller did an outstanding job on it, inserting a steel rod and epoxying the wrist back together, then re-cutting the checkering and matching the original finish/patina. I imagine there were lots of guns made up like these back in the day. Just a versatile homestead shotgun. Your gun appears to be made up in walnut with the barrel fitted with a drum and using a civilian 'Enfield' type percussion lock. Really a neat piece, it could tell tales of woe for small game and birds, Geo.
     
  4. Apr 3, 2019 #4

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

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    Interesting stuff...I actually obtained it from a guy who has had it for the last 25 years. According to him, he bought it from an antique shop up in Vermont.

    I know valuation is difficult -- it's worth what someone would pay for it. But, I'm not a collector and would rather see it have a good home for a reasonable price. Any idea what the market for something like this is?
     
  5. Apr 4, 2019 #5

    Brokennock

    Brokennock

    Brokennock

    50 Cal.

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    Are you in the Vermont New Hampshire area? There is a similar, though locally made (in the 1860s-1880s) piece on the wall for sale at Trader John's gun shop in Winchester, N.H. I can't remember his asking price. Maybe take it over there and compare notes.
     
  6. Apr 4, 2019 #6

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

    Dave Rodgers

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    I'm actually in Philadelphia, just moved here from the VT border a few years ago. The last owner is also from Philadelphia.
     
  7. Apr 4, 2019 #7

    TFoley

    TFoley

    TFoley

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    I didn't realise that the Royal Small Arms factory at Enfield Lock made ANY kind of civilian components. I have four such Enfield rifles right here in front of me, and none of them have that odd profile at the front, and in the area where, in a flintlock, the pan would have been situated. Such a gun is far more likely to have had a back-action lock, as I suggested in my earlier post.
     
  8. Apr 4, 2019 #8

    Blackpowder willy

    Blackpowder willy

    Blackpowder willy

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    Hi Dave! That's a good looking old Smooth Bore I've got one similar..
    My gun is a full stock with a 48 inch barrel it's got the same double stampmed crown and scepter I was told if it doesn't have the the view or proof letters around the stamp that is a pre 1813 civilian proof. My gun also has the London stamp on top of barrel 16 guage.
     
  9. Apr 4, 2019 #9

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

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    $175 to $250 is my guess.
     
    crankshaft likes this.
  10. Apr 4, 2019 #10

    crankshaft

    crankshaft

    crankshaft

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    The market for these are going down, down.
    And many other antiques.
    Down.
     
  11. Apr 5, 2019 #11

    Keb

    Keb

    Keb

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    It's nothing spectacular. Most old single & double smooth bored guns max out at $400.00.
     

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