Help needed designing .62 cal percussion rifle

Discussion in 'Percussion Rifles' started by pamtnman, Jul 22, 2019.

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  1. Aug 19, 2019 #21

    sheba

    sheba

    sheba

    40 Cal.

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    I also have this English sporting rile in 54

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Aug 19, 2019 #22

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    32 Cal.

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    Fascinating. Thanks for telling me. In a "normal" rifled .62 barrel, the every day charge would be around 130 to 160 grains. The barrel in my project here is a 38 inch Colerain gain twist, which starts out slowly and speeds up as the projectile moves up-bore. Gain twist is like Forsyth rifling, a sophisticated approach to black powder challenges back in the 1870s, as British sportsmen moved around the world and hunted previously unknown dangerous game with guns using more conventional systems that sometimes failed and left their users trampled and gored into red puddles. Another black powder bore system I am very familiar with is the Lancaster oval bore, which looks smooth to the eye at first. The egg-shaped rifling spins the projectile with simple, basic centrifugal force, relying much less on cut rifling. It is very accurate and less susceptible to fouling. Is your gun really accurate?
     
  3. Aug 19, 2019 #23

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    32 Cal.

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    OH YEAH. Fabulous gun there. Has the Alex Henry lock. Is it accurate?
     
  4. Aug 19, 2019 #24

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

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    Sheba, I should mention the Lancaster oval bore requires about 15% less black powder or NFB than traditional cut rifling systems. Forsyth rifling is the same.
     
  5. Aug 19, 2019 #25

    Mark Herman

    Mark Herman

    Mark Herman

    40 cal - b

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    Pamtnman,
    Haven't shot the .72 yet but am figuring it'll take 100-125 grains of FFg to get that bowling ball moving, maybe more. I think the ball weighs in at close to 500+ grains.
     
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  6. Aug 22, 2019 #26

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    32 Cal.

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    Do you recognize a reproduction facsimile of this butt plate? It is nearly half a heart, with an unusually deep bend and long top point. I have looked at the usual supply outlets (Track, Dixie, Pecatonica, etc) and have been unable to find anything like this. Thanks for any help!
    AUBV7479.JPEG Folsom little bat butt right side.PNG IMG_0125.PNG
     
  7. Aug 22, 2019 #27

    rickpa

    rickpa

    rickpa

    32 Cal

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    If I may offer some advice? I'd not use that buttplate on a large caliber thumper. I'd use an English style, wide, flat and high or musket style. You don't want a skinny deep curve that fits on your arm but one that fits on your shoulder shotgun style. But that's me. You might be able to handle recoil better. Check out the buttplates on British dangerous game guns.
     
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  8. Aug 22, 2019 #28

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

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    Thank you, Rick, your advice is welcome. You are stating an old truism about these deeply notched butt plates, and I am sure that for those shooters who were punished by their design, they are unpleasant to shoot. Three reasons why I am committed to this particular butt plate: First, it is historically accurate, and this gun is supposed to be historically accurate. So far I have seen three Folsom full-stock Plains rifles with exactly the same stock and this unusual butt plate. Little Bat Garnier was said to be the best shot with his Folsom rifle that anyone had ever seen, and that is saying a lot (he was a Sioux scout for Custer and the only survivor of the Little Big Horn, as well as a scout for Sheridan and other bluecoats, as well as a Sioux warrior and US Army meat hunter). Second, if it worked so well for Garnier, who was about five feet eight inches tall, then it should fit me and work for me, too, especially as I am a lot bigger than Garnier. I expect it to be much less punishing to me than it might be to someone smaller. Plus I have the benefit of what shooting science calls "significant protective girth," which that lean buffalo eater Little Bat did not enjoy. Third, the butt plate looks unique and cool as heck, I like it, it completes the beautiful lines of the rifle, and so it will be on my gun or there will be no Little Bat rifle reproduction at all. And if it does beat the snot out of me, I will call you, admit my mistake, and try to sell you a barely used percussion thumper
     
  9. Aug 24, 2019 #29

    Cjensen

    Cjensen

    Cjensen

    32 Cal

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    Hunted w/ and shot .62 cal. rifles more than most. Pointed butt plates might not be what you want since the business load in a .62 is around 90 gr. ff. It's a great cal. for hunting , but range practice w/ .62 and pointed butt plate could get painful before you become proficient. Charlie
     
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  10. Aug 26, 2019 #30

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

    pamtnman

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    Charlie, I do appreciate your guidance. Unfortunately, the historic gun we are copying is what it is, quite "pointy" of butt. Somehow I know this is not PC to write, but it is true. Two other Folsom rifles emerge quickly from internet searches (one sold at Cowan's and the other at Julia's) , and each also has a pretty deep and "pointy" butt plate; one of them is so deep it is almost Scheutzen-like. Like the rifle we are copying, both of these were Indian rifles used on the Great Plains in the 1860s and 1870s. The rifle we are copying was reputed to have been the most accurate gun anyone had ever seen. I am so committed to this particular butt plate design that, having now exhausted all commercially available options, we have decided to have a replica cast. Glad to hear you approve of the .62 caliber. I am excited about using it to hunt.
     

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