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Help Identifying Flintlock Pistol

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JohnL

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I’ve posted photos earlier, but I’m afraid that I posted in the wrong location (sorry). Flintlock pistol marked “Giacom Zambonetto” on top of the barrel and possibly “FLB” on bottom of barrel. Can anyone identify? Thanks!
 

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Zonie

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Italian? Roughly 1750-1770?

It looks like someone has refinished the stock. If the gun is actually 270 years old, the stock would never be that glossy.
 

JohnL

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Italian? Roughly 1750-1770?

It looks like someone has refinished the stock. If the gun is actually 270 years old, the stock would never be that glossy.
I was told something similar, but today I found that “FLB” stamp. I did a little research and found that it could indicate Fabrica Militar Fray Luis Beltran from Argentina. I can’t find any resources that show they made blackpowder pistols. I’m stumped.
 

bud in pa

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As someone who has 50% Italian heritage, with a name like that it has to be Italian. The first name could be shortened Giacomo,pronounced "Jockamo". This is just a guess.
 

Notchy Bob

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I can't help with identification, but I would like to say that is a beautiful piece. There is tasteful engraving on the triggerguard and an elegant, open work sideplate, but this pistol is otherwise very simply appointed. The real beauty is in its design and assembly. Even the screw heads are regulated, with slots all parallel to the bore!

I'll be look forward to reading what others may contribute regarding this great old pistol.

I would be interested in a more complete physical description, too. Bore size (I'm assuming it's a smoothbore), overall length, and any other details that may be significant.

Notchy Bob
 

JohnL

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I can't help with identification, but I would like to say that is a beautiful piece. There is tasteful engraving on the triggerguard and an elegant, open work sideplate, but this pistol is otherwise very simply appointed. The real beauty is in its design and assembly. Even the screw heads are regulated, with slots all parallel to the bore!

I'll be look forward to reading what others may contribute regarding this great old pistol.

I would be interested in a more complete physical description, too. Bore size (I'm assuming it's a smoothbore), overall length, and any other details that may be significant.

Notchy Bob
Thank you sir! I’ll get some measurements and post.
 

Notchy Bob

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Thank you!

I'm wondering if the barrel and fore stock may have been shortened at some point, just from the way the barrel and the wood end so abruptly, with such a square cut. That's a nice lock. The original metalwork is beautiful. I had previously missed the fact that it has no pan bridle. This pistol may be older than first thought!

Notchy Bob
 

rickystl

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Hmmm. A tough one to I.D. I'll go out on a limb here and guess it's from Northern Italy. Maybe 1750/60 period. The engraving on the trigger guard and semi-square back trigger guard lead me in this direction. Note that lock makers in this Region often continued to make locks with out a bridle between the pan and frizzen well into the late 18th Century. Also, as per Bob's observation, the gun definitely looks cut back/shortened sometime during the period. Which, unfortunately, was a fairly common practice then.

Rick
 

JohnL

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I wonder if the fact that they cut it down is why there’s no front sight, and why they had to repair the stock? Thank you both!
 

rickystl

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Hi JohnL

Most of these smoothbore pistols from this period were made without sights, front or rear. The original barrel length was probably around 11"-13". It could have been shortened due to some kind of damage. But more likely it was an officer's pistol that was cut down for ease of concealment for personal protection use at some later point. Unfortunately for us collectors and enthusiasts today, this was a common practice then Less expensive than having a new gun made.
The bore looks rough. But typical of many you see today from this period. Good chance this pistol was still being carried into the early 19th Century.

Rick
 

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