Heat from candle

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Regarding the snow cave - Eskimo families stay warm even without parkas in their igloo with the heat of an oil lamp. I've also read of a polite custom where visitors get to sleep next to the igloo owner's wife, for extra warmth....
Yeah, when I was living on the North Slope I learned that the traditional iglu apûn (snow house) and even the traditional iglus made of whale bones, driftwood, and sod, stayed plenty warm with just one seal-oil lamp and body heat. But the Iñupiat keep their modern houses hot with natural gas off the pipeline. 24 hours of sunlight a day keeps a tent nice and warm, especially if you have a dark coloured modern dome tent!
Jay
 

toot

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Regarding the snow cave - Eskimo families stay warm even without parkas in their igloo with the heat of an oil lamp. I've also read of a polite custom where visitors get to sleep next to the igloo owner's wife, for extra warmth....
OH YEH! JUST SIGHN ME UP! WHEN DO I LEAVE?
 
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During the 70's I spent a year working in Alberta Canada & during that winter experienced 65 degrees below zero.
While there a government agency recommended on TV that citizens traveling in the winter stock their vehicles with at least one heavy blanket per person, a flashlight, a sealed supply of matches & long life candles & a tip-proof bases to hold 3 or 4 in event they broke down or were stranded in a storm. During that winter I tried this in the cab of my truck & it made the cold bearable.
Rarely do we get intelligent advice from a govt agency.:thumb:
 
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During the 70's I spent a year working in Alberta Canada & during that winter experienced 65 degrees below zero.
While there a government agency recommended on TV that citizens traveling in the winter stock their vehicles with at least one heavy blanket per person, a flashlight, a sealed supply of matches & long life candles & a tip-proof bases to hold 3 or 4 in event they broke down or were stranded in a storm. During that winter I tried this in the cab of my truck & it made the cold bearable.
Rarely do we get intelligent advice from a govt agency.:thumb:
Don’t forget the squeeze bottle of honey and the package of cookies, booster cables and tow rope, snow shovel and kitty litter. Now you have everything that us Northern Alberta folk carry in winter.
I’ve only seen -63c for coldest temp, but lots in the -50c’s. In fact we have ice fished lots in -40 to -45c temps.
Walk
 
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Don’t forget the squeeze bottle of honey and the package of cookies, booster cables and tow rope, snow shovel and kitty litter. Now you have everything that us Northern Alberta folk carry in winter.
I’ve only seen -63c for coldest temp, but lots in the -50c’s. In fact we have ice fished lots in -40 to -45c temps.
Walk
How low can the honey go and still be squeezed out?
 

GBG

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FWIW, every person is carrying a lit candle with them all the time.

At rest the human body produces about 100 watts of heat from metabolism. I won't include the numbers but in 24 hours 100 watts will melt (at 32 degrees F, or 0 degrees Celsius) roughly 26 kg or 57 pounds of ice.
 

zimmerstutzen

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On another tack, I have a couple of old Jone pocket warmers. My daughter saw them and asked what they are. I explained that they were pocket warmers, they would be filled with lighter fluid and lit until the wire across the top glowed and then the flame blown out and the hot wire kept burning the fuel and creating heat.

She responded: "You walked around with a fire in your pockets? How stupid is that?"
 

Brokennock

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On another tack, I have a couple of old Jone pocket warmers. My daughter saw them and asked what they are. I explained that they were pocket warmers, they would be filled with lighter fluid and lit until the wire across the top glowed and then the flame blown out and the hot wire kept burning the fuel and creating heat.

She responded: "You walked around with a fire in your pockets? How stupid is that?"
I have one if those too.
Never thought of it that way.
 

smoothshooter

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About forty years ago, A buddy came up with a loose unscientific formula that on a still night, a single candle burning in a 8 x 8 wall tent with flaps closed and bottom perimeter closed would warm the interior about 9 degrees over the exterior temperature. So if it was 40 degrees out and he wished the tent to be 67, he would need three candles burning continuously. Over the years, this seemed a reasonable guesstimation. Not that I wanted a bunch of candles lit, especially if sleeping, but one late fall rondy with wife and 2 small children and a freezing rain on a 10 x 10 wall tent, for an afternoon and evening we kept 6 candles burning and stayed above "see my breath" temps. ( I had a small wood stove by the next rondy). Just wondered if anyone had come up with a similar rule of thumb.

Just the warm exhalations of 4 people in a relatively small confined space would raise the temperature some. Not saying the candles do not help.
There are some interesting experiments on the internet that involve using one or more candles in conjunction with inverted clay flower pots. Some guys stack 2 or 3 pots on top of each other The pots supposedly emit and retain a more radiant heat once brought up to temperature by the candle(s).
 
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smoothshooter

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Those are the best lamps. I need to re globe mine.

I would have bought or two of those already, but they sell for well over $100 apiece, and that is not counting the lamp shade to cut down the glare if used in the house.

What is the rate of consumption of kerosene?
It’s pretty expensive too.
 

zimmerstutzen

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I would have bought or two of those already, but they sell for well over $100 apiece, and that is not counting the lamp shade to cut down the glare if used in the house.

What is the rate of consumption of kerosene?
It’s pretty expensive too.

I live in Amish country. For decades the Amish used Aladdin lamps in their houses and shops and Coleman mantle lanterns to go out to the barn and out buildings at night. There were some pressurized kerosene mantle lanterns on the market that put out an incredible amount of light. I had one. Way too bright for use in the house, too much heat as well. But If I ran it up the flag pole, it would light up the whole yard like a mercury light. Anyway, the Amish are about as cheap as you can get when pinching a penny and if they used something as expensive as an aladdin lamp, there was a reason. Most of them now use rechargeable cordless drill batteries for everything. Even to power sewing machines and clothes washers. Lights on their buggies etc. Apparently the leadership for the largest group decided that "off grid" electricity was ok to use, so now most have solar panels, wind turbines and even diesel generators.
 

Tom A Hawk

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I would have bought or two of those already, but they sell for well over $100 apiece, and that is not counting the lamp shade to cut down the glare if used in the house.

What is the rate of consumption of kerosene?
It’s pretty expensive too.
Sometimes you can find reasonably priced lamps on Ebay, or the components needed to assemble one. I burn Clean Heat in my lamps as it has less odor than kerosene. Burn rate is quite high. A filled lamp may last 8 hours or so.
 

smoothshooter

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Sometimes you can find reasonably priced lamps on Ebay, or the components needed to assemble one. I burn Clean Heat in my lamps as it has less odor than kerosene. Burn rate is quite high. A filled lamp may last 8 hours or so.

How much does it cost per gallon, and how many hours will a gallon last?
 
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What about carbon monoxide poisonings , any problem there ? Every once and a while we get multiple deaths from folks , mainly tourists , using little gas cookers in closed vehicles or tents in cold weather .
Closed vehicles or a more air capturing bubble like a modern tent. I think most of our small sized tents for an event are pretty drafty
The difference between a car in a garage and a car in the garage with an open door
 
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She responded: "You walked around with a fire in your pockets? How stupid is that?"
WOW!!!!!!! I am a FF/investigator retired, Her thoughts hit a point. I have had a lit pocket warmer in my pocket a few dozen times when filling the truck or 4WD at the gas pumps.

Never gave it a thought and I was trained!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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