Hand Mortars - Late Production Examples?

Discussion in 'General Muzzleloading' started by hyuzu, Feb 17, 2019.

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  1. Jun 17, 2019 #41

    SgtWinterer

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  2. Jun 17, 2019 #42

    SgtWinterer

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  3. Jun 18, 2019 #43

    SgtWinterer

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  4. Jun 18, 2019 #44

    Loyalist Dave

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    Other than the idiot loading directly from a horn into a barrel that he's just fired, and shooting his grenade about half as far as a man can throw one..., Yeah that was a nice demo....:confused:

    LD
     
  5. Jun 19, 2019 #45

    SgtWinterer

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    My personal 2 cents...

    Hand Mortars are somewhat overrepresented. Considering the royal foundry of the prussian army,
    only made about 300 of them in a 70 year period, and the prussian army easily expanded to several
    100.000 Soldiers, they were not that common, even at their "peak".

    They were a product of the artillery and siege warfare advances of the time around 1700.
    But the shift towards more open battle, the sucess of the coehorn mortar, meant their was no
    real use for them anymore. So around mid of the century all efforts to make them a more
    common military weapon were halted. And the obscure gadget gradually become even rarer.
    But there was no real withdraw of the weapon either.

    Some later made examples often have "naval" in their description. Looking at the Nock
    volley gun, they put some effort into increasing the lethality of boarding parties in the
    late 18th century. Wouldn't be a far fetch that they revisited the concept of the hand mortar
    for the same purpose. On a moving and cramped ship, the higher flexibility of the hand mortar
    is a larger benefit then in a siege.
     

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