Greased paper cartridges....why?

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Currently own two smoothbores - rifle and pistol - that I am currently making traditional paper cartridges for the historical panache. .65 balls in a .69 bore.
I have a dozen loading options and ball size choices right up to greased patches and tighter ball size but I’m always reading and learning.

I fully get the bigger ball/greased patch idea and benefits but I have seen a couple references from folks about “greased paper cartridges.” How is this done and why would I want to do it?
 
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For my paper cartridges I roll them first with the ball end tied off.

So what you have is a paper tube with a .65 ball on one end. I use the french method in this picture for cartridge making But the British method of tying off the end ball works better.

Then I heat up a tin contain of solidified bees wax, pine Rosen and olive oil then dip the ball end into the liquified wax.

Once the mixture is semi dry, I dip 2-3 times more until the ball end is encapsulated in the wax, let dry. Load with powder charge after it cools.
 

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The reason you dip the ball end of a paper wrapped cartridge is pretty much the same as lubricating a fabric patch. You want some lubricant in the bore to allow for multiple loadings. The greased ball adds some thickness to the paper wrapped ball holding the load in place. For military applications greasing the ball in such an undersized ball and (paper) patch situation, quite a few shots can be fired before the fouling builds up to the point that the ball is difficult to load. Then its time for a bayonet charge.

On a woods walk situation where there will be multiple shots and some intervals between shooting stations, I do not grease the ball. I will spit on the ball end of a paper patched cartridge to moisten the fouling and I will use a damp wad of tow on a string to wipe the bore of some fouling. Tiny group accuracy is not always the desired requirement, but volume of fire is on some stations. I have used greased paper wrapped balls and found the fouling builds up quicker than ungreased paper cartridges that I lubricate with some spit before loading.
 
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The reason you dip the ball end of a paper wrapped cartridge is pretty much the same as lubricating a fabric patch. You want some lubricant in the bore to allow for multiple loadings. The greased ball adds some thickness to the paper wrapped ball holding the load in place. For military applications greasing the ball in such an undersized ball and (paper) patch situation, quite a few shots can be fired before the fouling builds up to the point that the ball is difficult to load. Then its time for a bayonet charge.

On a woods walk situation where there will be multiple shots and some intervals between shooting stations, I do not grease the ball. I will spit on the ball end of a paper patched cartridge to moisten the fouling and I will use a damp wad of tow on a string to wipe the bore of some fouling. Tiny group accuracy is not always the desired requirement, but volume of fire is on some stations. I have used greased paper wrapped balls and found the fouling builds up quicker than ungreased paper cartridges that I lubricate with some spit before loading.
I found that in my .62 I have to go to a .575 to use paper cartridges. Ungreased it stats getting hard to load at ten shots
 
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On occasion at 25-yards, whilst using my big 75-cal with greased paper cartridges, I have had the 'empty' paper cups that had surrounded the ball pierce the target backstop, looking for all the like of little bees nests stuck to the target frame.

... doesn't seem to affect the accuracy, as even 'string tied loads' in both the English and French manner shed the paper ...
 
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Since this thread is back, and I am a little smarter then I was a year ago, what is a good pre-made store bought lube I can heat and dip cartridges in? Presumably something not too greasy at room temperature. I see the recipe above (and thank you) but I am unfortunately not single and try to save time where I can.
 
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I make French style cartridges and lubed with Lehigh Valley Lube. Would get at least 15 shots before any resistance was felt. I used a .575 ball and 70 grains of Goex 3f. With practice I would get 4 inch groups at 50 yards. I guess that I will have to try Mr. Flintlock lube that is supposed to be the same lube. I really like the speed at which I can get a second shot off if necessary.
 
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Parafin, bee's wax could be used, but they are stiffer than lard and can be mixed with the melted fats (lard, tallow, bear grease etc.) to make a suitable lubricant to dip the part of the paper cartridge with shot or ball into.
 
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