Fusil de Chasse specs

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JackP

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I'm gathering info for a Fusil de Chasse build. I would like it to be as much like the plain hunting gun as possible. Things like drop at the heel, proper stock wood and pull length would be very helpful.
I have Track's plan but the drop at the heel is 2 1/2" which seem too shallow.
Clay Smith says on his site that Beech or Maple would be the proper wood but most seem to think walnut is correct. any help would be appreciated.
Thanks
Jack
 

Stan flanery

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I hope you get a lot of feedback on this question. I’m interested in the spec’s also. I’ve been thinking of getting a fusil as well. Good luck.
 

JackP

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I hope you get a lot of feedback on this question. I’m interested in the spec’s also. I’ve been thinking of getting a fusil as well. Good luck.
Stan, I reposted this in the Gun Building section like I should have in the first place. I have received several good responses there. You are welcome to Butt in and ask any questions you like.
Jack
 

JCKelly

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I think US Beech is a somewhat different wood than is European. I would stay with common old American walnut. This is just my own preference, not special knowledge of a fusil de chasse.

A book covering the basics of a fusil de chasse is The French Trade Gun in North America, by Kevin Gladysz ©2011. Look it over.

I believe French trade guns were essentially the same as what were used by Frenchmen in both France and in Canada for hunting.
 

JackP

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I think US Beech is a somewhat different wood than is European. I would stay with common old American walnut. This is just my own preference, not special knowledge of a fusil de chasse.

A book covering the basics of a fusil de chasse is The French Trade Gun in North America, by Kevin Gladysz ©2011. Look it over.

I believe French trade guns were essentially the same as what were used by Frenchmen in both France and in Canada for hunting.
Thanks, I have an American walnut board on the way.

Jack
 

rich pierce

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European walnut is the correct wood. American can be stained to resemble it. Dave Person has covered this. Maple is never appropriate unless you have a complicated story like the stock broke and it was re-stocked in Canada or New England in maple. Even then cherry is more appropriate.
 

JackP

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European walnut is the correct wood. American can be stained to resemble it. Dave Person has covered this. Maple is never appropriate unless you have a complicated story like the stock broke and it was re-stocked in Canada or New England in maple. Even then cherry is more appropriate.
Thanks Rich
 

Flinter 2

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I'm gathering info for a Fusil de Chasse build. I would like it to be as much like the plain hunting gun as possible. Things like drop at the heel, proper stock wood and pull length would be very helpful.
I have Track's plan but the drop at the heel is 2 1/2" which seem too shallow.
Clay Smith says on his site that Beech or Maple would be the proper wood but most seem to think walnut is correct. any help would be appreciated.
Thanks
Jack
As has been stated, European Walnut is the correct stock material for the original French Fusil de Chasse, the guns were made from about 1670 to about the late 18th century, most were made at the Tulle arsenal in France, they became so popular among Canadian hunters and fur trappers that some of the manufacturing was consigned to the arsenal at St. Etienne, but most were made at the Tulle arsenal.
They were also favored by the native Indians of Canada, were used by many Militiamen and also Roger's Rangers.
When speaking about the period correctness of reproductions of the French Fusil de Chasse and other guns of that period it must be remembered that they were not made on production lines, they were made one gun at a time by different gunsmiths, while they were made using certain guides (blue prints), they were hand made, parts were not interchangeable, nor were they all exactly to the same specs.
Probably the closest reproduction one is likely to find of the originals are the ones made by Center Mark Arms in the 1980's and 1990's, the Owner of Center Mark Arms used an original Tulle Fusil de Chasse as a model for his copies.
Some gun writer a while back wrote an article on reproduction long arms and mentioned the Fusil de Chasse as an example stating that it was a "close copy but still not period correct stating that the finals on the furniture were dissimilar from the originals" saying he examined an original and they weren't exactly alike", the writer I assume was ignorant of the fact that those guns were made one at a time by different craftsmen, some were master builders, others were not as skilled which was reflected in their work.
Center Mark Arms didn't turn out allot of guns, it was basically a small shop and each gun was produced by one person start to finish with the highest quality parts, but they were still as were the originals individual guns and no two were exactly alike in their completed form, very similar yes, exactly the same, no.
I've owned five Tulle Fusil de Chasse muskets, two were custom made for me, another was a Center Mark with a left hand lock which I bought in haste not realizing it was a lefty and sold almost immediately, of the other two I still own and love, both are Center Mark fusils, one stocked in walnut like the originals and the other is in dark curly maple, both are almost identical except for the wood, but putting them side by side one can easily find subtle differences.
So, my suggestion is don't get caught up in "thread counting", if the originals were not exactly alike, why worry about the copies.

Sorry for the long post.
 

JackP

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Thanks for that info Flinter, every bit helps. Tiny bits of information goes a long way when talking about the elusive Fusil de Chasse.
Jack
 
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