French Trade

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SimonKenton

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Stillhunter,

That jibes with much of what I read about the French v. English settlers. Where the French wanted mainly trade (which the Indians were smart enough to know would benefit them as well as the French) the English seriously lusted after land.
The French offered goods the local tribes could not make or otherwise obtain like gunpowder, guns, good steel knives, copper and iron pots and high quality woven fabrics. The Indians had a wealth of furs and skins not to mention the ability to help their French buddies survive harsh winters by sharing caches of fish, corn and other edibles.
I suspect by the end of the 18th century the Indian answer to an Englishman wanting a handout would have been unprintable.

-Ray :winking:
 

Henry

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The Indians even bought some products
they could make , like the small stone pipes often
called " Micmac pipes " that were made by french
craftmen in Montréal . The Indians knew it is more
fun to hunt than to breathe soapstone dust .

Still , a lot of craft was bought by the french , canoes
snowshoes , baskets etc.

When the " guerre de succession d'Autriche " ( 1740-1748)
finished , France and England were at peace again
Général Wolfe went to Paris to perfect his éducation in
horse riding , fencing and ... dancing .

Some Eastern Iroquoi tribes were worried that the colonist
of New England were going further west , so they manage to
trap the young lieutenant Washington into a attack on a
french diplomacy deleguation . Wich started the North
American side of the Seven Years war ( last F&I war )
some time earlier than its official start in Europe .
 

pegro1

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There's a book called "The Voyageurs" and its a history of the French Voyageurs and the fur trade. I have a copy and its filled with tons of info. They were in the great lakes area in the early 1600s and as far west as the misouri river and all over the far west of Canada trading with the naitves of the dakotas and even some cheyenne.
 

wayne1967

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Beowulf, is that the book by Nute? I've found several books intitled that. I am trying to gather info on the courier de bois.
 

pichou

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Nute is a very general work about voyageurs aka Brit era engagés.

I would start with Innis' The Fur Trade in Canada. Great book, lots of editions, etc. and a couple different titles.

Also online at either Our Roots/Nos Racines or Peel's Prairie Provinces. Both great sites.

In the French era voyageurs were the merchants with small outfits. The complete term was marchand-voyageur, which means traveling salesman. :rotf:

The guys who paddled the canoe were called engagés, who had signed a engagement or contract.

The woods runners were unlicensed traders.
 

Dale Lilly

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Wow! Guys I got an education here. I know about the Rocky Mountain fur trade in early 1800s but your details about earlier trading is new to this old codger. Thanks. Polecat
 

tenngun

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Stillhunter,

That jibes with much of what I read about the French v. English settlers. Where the French wanted mainly trade (which the Indians were smart enough to know would benefit them as well as the French) the English seriously lusted after land.
The French offered goods the local tribes could not make or otherwise obtain like gunpowder, guns, good steel knives, copper and iron pots and high quality woven fabrics. The Indians had a wealth of furs and skins not to mention the ability to help their French buddies survive harsh winters by sharing caches of fish, corn and other edibles.
I suspect by the end of the 18th century the Indian answer to an Englishman wanting a handout would have been unprintable.

-Ray :winking:
There were social differences between Tudor/Stuart/ Republican/ Restoration/Orange and Hanorvian England and France
England was long on armed Yoeman Militia and voluntary armies raised for the crisis.
France was none to crazy about arming pesants. This would work against them in the settlement of New France. While at the same time British settlers came ready to throw up a new village and defend it as needed.
France became a trader more then a settler because things worked out that way, not from design.
The pre Industrial Age and early Industrial Age hit England and paid off. It was slower to bloom in France as the peasantry was still an area of nervousness for the French aristocracy. And they had little room for a middle class. Any Trade was non gentlemanly.
The result was England could put good goods into the hand of Indians cheaper then the French and as importantly at higher profits for the Brits
After the fact it’s easy to see a plan, while it was going on no plan existed.
 
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