French Habitant from the Pays en Haute

Discussion in 'Share Your Persona' started by tom w, Sep 22, 2005.

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  1. Sep 22, 2005 #1

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    My grandfather, Guillaume Rouville, arrived in Montreal in 1691 as a member of the Company Franche de la Marine. He soon retired from the service and lived off of his pention and trade as a carpenter. He married in 1698 and had four daughters. The second, born in 1701, was my mother Elanore Dores. She grew up in the city and in 1725 got married as well to one Gilles de L'Ours. The son of a tin smith the new couple decided to began a farm south of the city on the Richelieu River to start a family. In 1731 they had their first child, Jean Philippe de L'Ours. I grew up on the families farm tending the land and helping my father with the cropes of wheat and onions till my 21st year. Then in the spring of 1752 my cousin Etienne LaChatte came to the farm after having wintered in the Pays en Haute. He was employed as a voyager and few ill while trading amongst the
    Pottawatomi tribe of Southern Lake Michigan. He told me that there was much money to be made in the fur trade and that he had established good relations with the natives while he recovered from his fever. He also said that the commander at Fort Ste. Joseph would look the other way if an uncommissioned trade cabin were to spring up in the woods near by as the commander wished to recover some of his losses from the most recent war with England. Etienne proposed that we go and start a trade cabin this summer. Feeling the need for adventure I decided to accompany him in this venture and, at the protest of my mother, left for the west.

    After establishing our post we began trade with the natives backed by supplies from the post. Entienne managed to bring his wife Madeline from Montreal and I fell in love with half blood Pottawatomi girl, Anne Juliette Chartre who had been baptised and living at the post.

    And so life on the frontier of new france continues, and life here is good!
    [​IMG]
    Units web site: Habitants du Petit Fort
     
  2. Sep 23, 2005 #2

    Henry

    Henry

    Henry

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    Bonjour Monsieur ,


    Is your personnae related to
    Fran
     
  3. Sep 26, 2005 #3

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    Not as such,

    My cousin and myself came up with a persona for our family. We basically gave our grandparnets, aunts and uncles french names and backgrounds. Then we took all our birthdays and dialed them back 250 years or so.

    We were just making up french sounding names. I was not aware that the name was related to an actual historical figure! My cousin actually came up with the name for our grandfather, so he may have seen the name in a book on the early 1700's and figured it would do.

    It was in no way intentional, however it is nice to know Rouville was a really person in New France.

    Via le Roy!

    Jean Philippe
     
  4. Nov 14, 2005 #4

    ashleywyoung

    ashleywyoung

    ashleywyoung

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    I think an excellent book for both you and your unit would be Indian Women and French Men by Susan Sleeper-Smith published by the University of Massachusetts Press. It's a great resource dealing with both your area and time period and would definitely answer some questions I noticed your group may, or may not, have regarding Fort St. Joseph and the surrounding area.

    A.W.Y.
     
  5. Nov 14, 2005 #5

    M Murier

    M Murier

    M Murier

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    Jean Philippe Richard de L'Ours et
    Etienne LaChatte both seem to be remiss in contacting their Parish leaders. There are roads and fencing to be repaired. And they were not at the last Milice gathering. Lt. Murier wishes them to return and fulfill their obligations! QDC, Michel Murier, Lt, Cie Marine
     
  6. Jan 7, 2006 #6

    howdydoit

    howdydoit

    howdydoit

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    thats a pretty good way to go because you have a face to go along with the names you used. It like talking about your own family over 200 years ago. Makes it easier to get into. :bow:
     
  7. Apr 1, 2006 #7

    Blackpowder Injun

    Blackpowder Injun

    Blackpowder Injun

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    funny you should say that, my 6th great grandfather left Bayonne France and settled with an Indian tribe (Chitimacha) in south Louisiana, married an indian woman, and 250 years later, here I am...lol
     
  8. Apr 1, 2006 #8

    rebel727

    rebel727

    rebel727

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    Funny how that works ain't it? :hmm:
     
  9. Nov 13, 2006 #9

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    Lt. Murier,

    Etienne and I must send you our apologize. We were not able to attend the last parish muster as we had many things to attend to around the cabin. I have been very busy this year making preparations for my up coming wedding. So you will excuse me for my absence at the construction detail. We hope to see you in the spring once the rivers are traversable again.

    Your Servant,

    Jean Philippe
     
  10. Nov 13, 2006 #10

    No Deer

    No Deer

    No Deer

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    That is a 25cent fine for missing muster isn't it? :rotf:
     
  11. Nov 15, 2006 #11

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    What are these "cent" you refer to? We are not paid any livere by the King for our service as every man from 16-60 is required to serve in the parish milice.

    We are not paid by His Most Christian Majesty therefore we can not be fined. If I had wanted to make money as a soldier I would have joined the Troupes de Terre... but I am no soldier, just a humble habitant defending my own.

    JP
     
  12. Nov 15, 2006 #12

    Henry

    Henry

    Henry

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    Yes , one can be fined for not showing at the sunday
    exercise , not wearing your hat on sunday , if you are
    known to have one , or showing at church with your
    socks rolled down !!! Fines vary with period
    and area , from a few " sols " ( cents ) to a few
    months in the Great Lakes forts .

    You will have to wait 1755 to join the Armée de Terre
    and can not join the Troupes de la Marine unless
    you are from the nobility , the aim is to get the
    soldiers from the Compagnies Franches to settle in
    New France , not to lose a farmer to the military .

    The milice is not paid , sometime they get free repairs on their guns and few pieces of clothing , One little documented
    detail , they are supposed to have a right to gather
    objects on the batle field ... watches , money , tools etc...
     
  13. Dec 7, 2006 #13

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    Thank you for the information,

    I was not aware of the fine for not attending muster, nor was I aware of Milice being allowed to loot!! Very interesting...

    I know about there not being any french metropolitian infantry in the New World before 1755 (unless you count the Carignan-Salières Regiment in 1665). I actually also do a french regular impression as well and am a member of the regt. du Royal Roussillon reenactment unit out of the midwest US. Michel (who posted above) is actually the Milice capt. for that unit, which is why he was busting my onions... :winking:
     
  14. Jan 4, 2007 #14

    aloyalistdawg

    aloyalistdawg

    aloyalistdawg

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    :hatsoff: Very good , I liked the read... may I now ask what firelock you use?
    My best regards Loyalistdawg
     
  15. Jan 15, 2007 #15

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    I actually have two firelocks and a pistol in my collection.

    My first is a pedersoli model 1766 "Charleville" .69 cal military musket, which I use when I do French Regular Infantry (Regt. Royal Rousillon). This was my first flintlock weapon.

    When I am doing Milice, I have a .62 cal french style fowler, she is not a Tulle but is based on the design with a more strait styled butt (not curved like the Tulles are). She has a 42 inch octagon to round barrel with one wedding band and iron hardware. I love this gun as it is very reliable and I have live shot her alot with good accuracy and hope to go hunting with it soon. She is also a good Fusile de Chasse as she is very light for long walks or hunts...

    Finally I have a queen anne style pistol in .50 cal, this is my newest purchase and I like it. I have live shot it a couple of times and it is a fun piece. This is mostly for personal fun, and for use as a demonstrotory trade item, as alot of pistols were brought as gifts to the indian leaders.

    JP.
     
  16. Jan 16, 2007 #16

    tom w

    tom w

    tom w

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    Just as a note, I also reenact American Civil War and WWII. For those time periods I currently own:

    A 1859 Sharps Berdan rifle, this is a breech loader but still requires a black powder paper cartridge and percussion cap. It has a double set trigger and was used by the green coated Union berdan sharpshooters, an impression I have just started doing for this period.

    For WWII I have, of course, modern non black powder weapons:

    An M1 garand
    An M1 Carbine
    A K98 Mauser
    and a .38 S&W Victory Pistol

    That pretty much rounds out my collection, minus a few "dummy" display guns.
     

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