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So I had this idea to build a working ML rifle the cheapest way possible. Got a 24-inch section of new Green Mountain .36 barrel for $40, got a Dixie percussion lock for $70, old CVA trigger guard for $15. Now get this part - found that local lumberyard has a stack of 3/4-inch maple, hard as a rock, some with uniform curl. Can get a 9 in x 84 inch x 3/4 plank for $28. I could laminate two sides together to get a full-thickness blank. I had a book by McCrory years ago that mentioned doing this for people on a budget. Anyone else ever tried this?
 

Robby

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Using a good quality glue there is no reason why it wouldn't work. I would cut both halves as close to the profile of the gun as I could before gluing. Less surface area lessen the chance of having a gap somewhere.
Good luck!!!!
Robby
 
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The old theroy was that glued stocks would fail due to the vibration of firing over time would fatigue the glued joint. But now you see laminated stocks on many modern rifles which would have more recoil than black powder guns.
 

Sean E Bug

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I want to try something similar one day but with ofcuts from blanks I have used for other guns. I can not think of a reason this shouldn't work. I would have both faces plained so you know trhey are flat and use long boards under the clamps to make the pressure more even. the cheapest I have been able to build a gun was $300 but I had to buy everything.
 

waarp8nt

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I thought about trying this configuration 3/4 maple, 3/8 walnut and 3/4 maple for a dark stripe down the middle. However, before you go to all the trouble it might be worth checking with Pecatonica for a worm hole stock or a scratch and dent stock. My old sale flyer from them suggest giving them a call to see what they had in stock at any given time.
 
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You might have some issues with the stock shrinking over time. Lumber yard stuff is often pretty green, even the kiln-dried boards. If the wood changes even slightly, you could have problems with lock and trigger inlet, or forestock pulling on the barrel.
Not a reason not to try, particularly as the idea is to make a low cost build. I've often thought one reason many original plain working rifles did not survive is the use of green(er) stocks. Stocks would shrink, twist and split over time. They served for a few years and then got converted or restocked. Then the technology changed that even the barrel and mechanical bits were considered obsolete. I'm not a historian, just my own theory.
 
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These planks have been in a stack in the attic of the lumberyard for years, dust on the stack. Pulled one out, straight as a string, no cupping, no warping, both surfaces planed flat and smooth. Straight grain, no knots or imperfections. Think I could get a left and a right pattern halfstock easily out of one board.
 
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Any warping issues might be mitigated by selecting two consecutive boards that were once the same piece wood. Check the end grain, if it matches then they were once one piece. If it is milled smooth between the halves, and you make a good glue joint, the seam might be nearly invisible.
 

Stykbow

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If those planks have been stored in a dry attic for years after cutting and planing it won’t be any more likely to warp than a stock blank bought from a supplier. If it was going to warp it would’ve done it by now. I’m with some of the other guys here. I say go for it and keep us posted on your progress.
 
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Just something that I’m making at the moment, it’s all glue and scrap ply. 4B93C240-F88E-4225-9CBB-293589BD2C1F.jpeg _
 
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The old theroy was that glued stocks would fail due to the vibration of firing over time would fatigue the glued joint. But now you see laminated stocks on many modern rifles which would have more recoil than black powder guns.
Lots of WW2 Mausers and Mosin Nagents had laminated stocks and held up well enough to still be with us.
 

Col. Batguano

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You might look at the ends to see if you can match the end grain, or do it counter-grain to the other board. Those boards will have different internal stresses in them and seasonally move differently. Also, 1 1/2" total thickness may not be enough for you. Most builders start with 2 1/4" or 2" at a bare minimum. All I'm saying is that 1 1/2" might just be a little bit on the tight side.

Getting good clamping for the full bearing surface is going to be a challenge too. The best of course would be a vacuum clamp but, absent that, plenty of clamps with a bowed cross piece will work (bow the middle inwards so as to put plenty of pressure in the middle. A couple of 2x4's with 1/8"-1/4" taken off the outside would probably work. I would use as many of them as I could find clamps for.

Personally though, I wouldn't do it. Not with the hundreds of hours of work you have in front of you. So far you've been able to get adequate quality materials for cheap. Kudos for that. What you're talking about NOW is to try to take inadequate materials you get for cheap and make them in to quality. That's a tough row to hoe.
 
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My son is a stockmaker and builds lots of 6 and 7 inch wide benchrest stocks. He glues them together with tite bond glue and strips from quarter inch thick to three quarter inch. He has a steel press to put them in to clamp evenly. It is a lot of work and time but if done right there is no problems. You will have no problem with two pieces just use lots of glue and clamps and take your time.
 

stephenprops1

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So I had this idea to build a working ML rifle the cheapest way possible. Got a 24-inch section of new Green Mountain .36 barrel for $40, got a Dixie percussion lock for $70, old CVA trigger guard for $15. Now get this part - found that local lumberyard has a stack of 3/4-inch maple, hard as a rock, some with uniform curl. Can get a 9 in x 84 inch x 3/4 plank for $28. I could laminate two sides together to get a full-thickness blank. I had a book by McCrory years ago that mentioned doing this for people on a budget. Anyone else ever tried this?
I repaired a cracked gun stock by putting wood glue on each half and pressing them together until they dried. I then drove a brad into the stock to reinforce the repair. --- Perhaps you could use a similar technique to fashion your desired stock?
 
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