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Loyalist Dave

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So for fur trade use they wouldn’t be completely out of line.

Any recommendations on makers of something comparable?

My other issue is that my 14 year old son wears a size 14…nobody makes anything off the shelf in that size. Need some help there.

Well they are suede, and won't protect your feet much with those soft soles. Those are mostly (imho) for lounging around the house on a cold winter day....

So my old proper pair has worn out, and Fugawee doesn't have my size in stock, SO..., I opted for some Chukka style boots. There are lots out there and they have a wide range of sizes. I bought these because of the tread,
Arkbird Chukka Boots, Black
I wear spatter dashers over them to hide the laces. The key is to look for chukkas with only two pairs of lace holes, IF you can fine them that fit, AND with a decent tread. Alas they only show size 13 for the ones in the link that I provided.

These Clark boots come in size 14 : Clark Bushacre 2.
The tread leaves something to be desired, but you do need shoes. The leather can also be dyed black if needed, and they are a lot less expensive than repro shoes these days. When you click the link it only shows to size 12 but if you look you will see a spot to "show all" and you will find size 14 when you do that.

Here are some Bruno Marc boots in 14 with a better sole Bruno Marc Chukka Boots They have three pairs of lacing holes, but again you need something that works for your son's feet. I'd probably dye these black if I was using them as I do soldier, but to each their own. I found with suede some dye and some black polish and they look a LOT like "rough side out" leather shoes.

LD
 

DixieTexian

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Those look more like bottes sauvage,, the French Canadian high top version of soulier de boeuf, which are also thought to be essentially the same as shoepacks by many historians. Not sure what era ones with laces would fit into.

Edit: was replying to Brazos John. Loyalist Dave posted while I was typing.
 
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Great post Dave! Thank you!

Those Bruno Marc’s look like the answer. I’m going to order the dark brown for him and the tan for me.

Maybe we can find a trader to make us some HC Blackfeet Mocs there. Going the RMNR in Riverton WY
 

stephenprops1

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Just make some. They are easy enough. Use the German tanned from crazy crow for the most historical accuracy, or use a fairly thin veg tanned leather, as I'm sure there were plenty of moccasins made with commercially tanned leather back in the day as well, particularly by European settlers who had access to or tanned their own veg tanned leather.
Tandy Leather has pre-packaged kits you can buy. All you have to do is dye (if you want) and assemble them.
 

DixieTexian

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Tandy Leather has pre-packaged kits you can buy. All you have to do is dye (if you want) and assemble them.
No offense, but pretty much any of the kits you would buy from a leather supplier are not going to be correct. If all you are looking for is not "out of place" for the event you are going for, then feel free to do whatever you want. Actual historically correct moccasins are easy enough to make in an evening with the multitude of YouTube videos out there from Native Americans who still make them the traditional way. There is no real need to buy a kit. And you will probably be able to make something much more correct for less money.
 
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So for fur trade use they wouldn’t be completely out of line.

Any recommendations on makers of something comparable?

My other issue is that my 14 year old son wears a size 14…nobody makes anything off the shelf in that size. Need some help there.
Fugawee has the Jefferson Bootie in stock in sizes up to 14.5EE in black & brown rough side out. These would be correct from the early 1800s to the end of the era we discuss here and later.
 

Red Owl

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I don't know why people can wear a low top shoe but moccasins have to have a high top. Why not try the side seam pattern. As stated. they are very easy to make. Buy some cheap vinyl and make a template you can use over and over again. A soft sole was pretty much it in the northern plains, pre-1840. The hard soles were in the Taos, southwest. William Drummond Stewart speaks about stuffing grass into his moccasins because he had to get off his horse and walk and others wrote about cactus needles poking through their moccasins. The Taos trappers, a group going to the Rendezvous got stuck in the mountains ands had to boil and eat the supply of rawhide soles they had with them, so as I said- more southwest.
If you just have to be 100% pc, get some real sinew from Crazy Crow. It is pretty easy to use. Dampen it to make it soft but leave one end dry so it is stiff enough the push through holes make with an awl. Wrap stitch. The sinew will only be 10" or so but leave the tag end along the edge and feed in a new section, As I said, pretty easy to do.
A lot of painting show mountain men wearing a puckered toe type moccasin but this is not the huge toe you see at Tandy (kits) or road side shops selling moccasins. There are several patterns. A lot of mountain men had red felt over the toe and a single row of white beads along te edge and re-used the toe when the soles wore out.
I have both, I sewed a second, thicker sole on the puckered toe moccasins to make them last longer.
 

DixieTexian

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I don't know why people can wear a low top shoe but moccasins have to have a high top. Why not try the side seam pattern. As stated. they are very easy to make. Buy some cheap vinyl and make a template you can use over and over again. A soft sole was pretty much it in the northern plains, pre-1840. The hard soles were in the Taos, southwest. William Drummond Stewart speaks about stuffing grass into his moccasins because he had to get off his horse and walk and others wrote about cactus needles poking through their moccasins. The Taos trappers, a group going to the Rendezvous got stuck in the mountains ands had to boil and eat the supply of rawhide soles they had with them, so as I said- more southwest.
If you just have to be 100% pc, get some real sinew from Crazy Crow. It is pretty easy to use. Dampen it to make it soft but leave one end dry so it is stiff enough the push through holes make with an awl. Wrap stitch. The sinew will only be 10" or so but leave the tag end along the edge and feed in a new section, As I said, pretty easy to do.
A lot of painting show mountain men wearing a puckered toe type moccasin but this is not the huge toe you see at Tandy (kits) or road side shops selling moccasins. There are several patterns. A lot of mountain men had red felt over the toe and a single row of white beads along te edge and re-used the toe when the soles wore out.
I have both, I sewed a second, thicker sole on the puckered toe moccasins to make them last longer.
You don't need to use sinew if you are portraying a European making their own moccasins. Native, maybe so, but Europeans would have had access to plenty of different cordage options, especially if they were used to carrying goods for trade. Many of the resources I've seen about making southeastern pucker toe moccasins say to cut a strip of leather from edge of the cutout you make for your moccasins and wet it and stretch it. While I've never messed with brain tan hide like that, they always seem to break for me. If your persona had access to linen cord when he learned to make moccasins, it would make plenty of sense to keep some handy during his travels for such a purpose.

That also gets to another point. If your guy learned to make moccasins on the frontier back east, there is a good chance he would stick with that pattern as he traveled west. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 
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