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Flintlock Cheek piece questions

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JB67

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Looking for info on cheek pieces for longrifles. I'm not looking to follow any specific school or pattern, but I want things to look right. I'm not concerned about mixing styles between things like the cheek rest and buutplate or comb, this is something just for fun.

The biggest question is what's the smallest distance a rest will protrude from the side of the stock. Judging from pictures, it looks like half to 3/4" is typical. Were any ever as low as a quarter of an inch? Anyone have pics of such as examples?

I'd also like to see pics of stocks without them at all. I can see some of the southern poor boys tended to have little or no rest.

Any fancy full-stock Hawken-type flinters are of interest, too.
 

JB67

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I think you answered all your own questions. If you don't want to follow any particular school, then just build your stock the way you want.
If you decide on a particular school you will get a ton of advice here.
True. I'm not doing a scratch build but reworking a Traditions kit. The direction I go in depends on several things.

I did find this picture (and more of the rifle itself,) believed to be New England, early 1800s. This offers a real possibility..New-England-9.jpg

Almost non-existent, and very doable on my stock.
 

JB67

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I make my rifles w/ a cheek piece that protrudes 1/4" at the front and 3/8" at the rear. Most originals were similar. Also the lower edge is only 3-1/2"-3-3/4" long.
Thanks. That's the kind of info I am seeking. Beautiful piece!
 

Col. Batguano

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You are stating 2 conflicting things with your opening statement;

"You are not concerned with following any particular school, but want it to look right."

By virtue of this statement, it seems to me that you are really trying to stay somewhat within a school, as far as what might have possibly been done within it. Probably the best thing for you to do here is to study as many pictures of originals to see what actually WAS done. My guess is that there was a fair amount of variation.

Actual sculpting and profiling of the cheek piece is best done by using your own facial profile. Mount the gun about a zillion times, and see what gives you the best cheek weld, and lines up the sights the best.

Yes, caliber, comb angle, pitch. BP shape, and your most common shooting position, are all going to make a difference too. A short-barreled 58 caliber mostly shot from the bench is going to have different recoil characteristics than a long barreled 32 cal. (normal loads) shot mostly from standing.
 
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JB67

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There's no conflict. I apologize for not phrasing it better, though. I'm looking for examples of stocks with low profile cheek rests, regardless of era or region.

What I find will dictate the rest of the general style. Thus, the actual school itself matters little. The stock I have and what I can do with it will determine that.
 
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By the time you get into half stocks the curved or rounded cheekpiece is more common. At least that is true with the Hawken rifles and later North Carolina style rifles I have seen. Straight cheekpieces with "dished" out and did stick out more on earlier rifles. With a curved cheekpiece the distance that it sticks out is greater toward the butt.

Cory Joe Stewart
 

Col. Batguano

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A Northwest Trade gun might be a candidate, as well as some versions of English sporting rifles, or other continental pieces. Most fowlers don't have them. There are a few military half stocks as well, like the 1803 Harpers Ferry.

English and continental guns are usually stocked in Walnut however, as was the 1803.
 

JB67

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Sorry jb didn't mean to jump in.
By all means, all ideas are welcome. This isn't just about my plans. If a side discussion opens up, let it. It's how we gain knowledge.

Since the early 1800s seem to have a mix of styles developing in cheek rest and half or full stock, flint or percussion, thing could get quite interesting.
 

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