First French Scalper attempt

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9 1/2” overall length, iron pins, Rosewood handle, tapered tang
 

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Bushfire

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"Scalpers" were more an English term and the style associated with that term.

The boucheron would be your more accurate representation of a french knife of the 18th century.

Even then there were different variations of boucheron.

The knife is a beauty mate.
 

Notchy Bob

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Dan, that’s a beautiful knife! I would consider it more of an English style, but as an English scalper, it is very nicely done.

I believe knives of this type would typically have a 6”-7” blade, giving a total length around 10”-11” or a trifle more, so this knife is a little smaller than would be typical. The way the flats taper on the handle is a little unusual, too, from an historical perspective, but the appearance is beautiful. I saw a Scandinavian knife once that had very similar handle geometry. It was gorgeous.

Your choice of materials, the grinding, and the overall fit and finish are impeccable. While we might nit-pick some of the historic details, as above, I would say they are relatively minor. It is a beautiful knife, and shows sincere effort toward historic re-creation. It also shows a lot of courage on your part to submit it to this crowd for criticism!

You go, Dan!

Notchy Bob
 
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"Scalpers" were more an English term and the style associated with that term.

The boucheron would be your more accurate representation of a french knife of the 18th century.

Even then there were different variations of boucheron.

The knife is a beauty mate.
That makes sense, I was using picture from fur trader sketch book for ideas. I was attempting to make a blade that I haven’t seen many people make. Maybe I’ll try boucheron in the future.
Thank you for the complement from down under!
 
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Dan, that’s a beautiful knife! I would consider it more of an English style, but as an English scalper, it is very nicely done.

I believe knives of this type would typically have a 6”-7” blade, giving a total length around 10”-11” or a trifle more, so this knife is a little smaller than would be typical. The way the flats taper on the handle is a little unusual, too, from an historical perspective, but the appearance is beautiful. I saw a Scandinavian knife once that had very similar handle geometry. It was gorgeous.

Your choice of materials, the grinding, and the overall fit and finish are impeccable. While we might nit-pick some of the historic details, as above, I would say they are relatively minor. It is a beautiful knife, and shows sincere effort toward historic re-creation. It also shows a lot of courage on your part to submit it to this crowd for criticism!

You go, Dan!

Notchy Bob
I’ll have to do some more research for the next one. I may have misinterpreted the image and description in the fur traders sketch book, lol.
I really appreciate the information and the positive feedback you’ve offered.
Thank you!
 

Brokennock

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The knife looks very well made. I like the handle and the way it is pinned very much.
Poke around the forum for knife making posts/replies from @LRB
(The one and only Wick Ellerbe, google images of his knives) and you should find where he has posted a picture showing blade shapes of actual dug artifacts of French and English knives for comparison. Also providing the data for the differences between how the English and the French pinned the blades and handles together.
 
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Do NOT let the French see your Scalping Knife! It is so beautiful that they may resume taking scalps just to use it!!
The knife looks very well made. I like the handle and the way it is pinned very much.
Poke around the forum for knife making posts/replies from @LRB
(The one and only Wick Ellerbe, google images of his knives) and you should find where he has posted a picture showing blade shapes of actual dug artifacts of French and English knives for comparison. Also providing the data for the differences between how the English and the French pinned the blades and handles together.
Will do, thank you!
 

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