Finger in the trigger guard on single action revolvers?

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rshveyda

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I know we are all trained to keep our finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard for safety, especially on modern unmentionables. I've shot various single action revolvers for years, and since some of them are rather heavy, I've always picked them up with a finger inside the trigger guard. Often with my thumb against the hammer to boot. The gun won't fire until cocked, and pulling the trigger is necessary to lower the cocked hammer as part of the loading process so it always just felt natural.

I've never really thought about it, but via muscle memory, I handle a single action revolver completely different from how I handle a modern unmentionable. And it's completely contrary to what we preach for safety (keep your booger-hook off the trigger) when shooting other types of firearms. It just looks kind of cringy to me when I see someone holding a single action army with the hammer down and their finger outside the guard.
 

WesB

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It's the start of a possible dangerous situation. My wife was keeping her finger in the trigger guard and the cooked the hammer to fire. She had a negligent discharge with my Uberti 1860 Army. No damage or injuries, bit she did learn a lesson.
 

tenngun

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You have to be smarter then your gun. Safety rules work but are designed for the people that have to be told not to reach under a running lawn mower.
And ranges have to assume your too stupid to walk and chew gum at the same time.
Ml are not modern guns and depend on the shooter thinking ahead.
 

Bnewberry

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I used to shoot a lot of Cowboy Action. This was often debated. I believe finger off the trigger is the correct approach.

Unintentional discharges are a chain of events. Break a link in that chain and there is no discharge. Finger off the trigger is a key link in that chain.
 

WesB

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You have to be smarter then your gun. Safety rules work but are designed for the people that have to be told not to reach under a running lawn mower.
And ranges have to assume your too stupid to walk and chew gum at the same time.
Ml are not modern guns and depend on the shooter thinking ahead.
I agree and the same opinion.
 

jimhallam

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Doesn’t matter if it is a proper gun OR an unmentionable. Finger out until you are aiming at your target and ready to engage. Spin a gun on my range and you‘re out!
I agree completely, John --- the lAST thing we want is another "reason" (excuse) for us to eb vilified.
I hope we will see you on the 28th/29th August at the Surrey Branch MLAGB "Repeating Pistol Meeting" (Cheylesmore Range)
 

bisleyjohn

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I agree completely, John --- the lAST thing we want is another "reason" (excuse) for us to eb vilified.
I hope we will see you on the 28th/29th August at the Surrey Branch MLAGB "Repeating Pistol Meeting" (Cheylesmore Range)
In the diary👍
 

fishmusic

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Whilst I was in the Navy and stationed in Idaho Falls another sailor returned from sick leave. The reason for the sick leave was because he purchased a .44 cap and ball revolver, drove out into the desert and tried to practice quick draw. 50 miles from nowhere this fellow pulled it from his holster and promptly shot a hole in his right foot. This was in a time before cell phones. Imagine having to drive yourself 50 miles in a standard shift vehicle. I don't know how he did but I'll bet it was in first gear all the way.

Keep you finger out of the trigger guard.
 

GomezMunoz1951

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Back in 1973, when I bought my very first BP Revolver, a Uberti 1858 Remington .44, I learned real quick to keep my finger away from the trigger at all times until I was ready to shoot and it was pointed at the target. I bought the gun second hand and the previous owner had put Bone grips on it, brazed the front sight higher, and he had the trigger and hammer honed down to where a strong breeze would set it off. After a couple of shots going off into the air and into the ground, I learned to only put the finger in the trigger guard when you have the sights lined up and you are ready to fire. I shot the crap out of that revolver and finally the hammer wore down so much that it would not go to full cock. A new hammer and trigger and it is back to shooting trim, but it still has a very light trigger. I bought 3 Pietta Remington .44's and their trigger is nowhere near as touchy. But I still keep my finger away from the trigger until those sights are lined up and I am ready to shoot.
 

Art Caputo

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Attention to safe handling practices applies to all handguns, particularly single action revolvers due to the inherent fragility of the lock-works and generally lighter trigger in many of the early designs. Cocking the hammer and/or engaging the trigger prematurely(off target) is a practice that may eventually bite you, or worse, someone else. I also think the tradition of keeping an un-loaded chamber(or cylinder web notch) under the hammer, and the use of unexposed trigger style holsters are wise carry practices with the SA designs. IMO.
 

wb78963

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Attention to safe handling practices applies to all handguns, particularly single action revolvers due to the inherent fragility of the lock-works and generally lighter trigger in many of the early designs. Cocking the hammer and/or engaging the trigger prematurely(off target) is a practice that may eventually bite you, or worse, someone else. I also think the tradition of keeping an un-loaded chamber(or cylinder web notch) under the hammer, and the use of unexposed trigger style holsters are wise carry practices with the SA designs. IMO.
Art you are exactly correct,
Shooting C&B revolvers is a pastime regularly done by me and always only five chambers on a six shot revolver are loaded and capped hammer down on the empty chamber.
My 1862 Colt Police, being a five shooter, all chambers are loaded but capped on the firing line but not carried around.
I am aware of the "safety" pins between chambers, but I shall ere on the side of caution since those pesky Comanches have been pretty quiet around here lately so six shots are not needed.
Bunk
 

Sam squanch

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I know 2 people who shot themselves practicing a fast draw . One in the knee, with a 22 unmentionable, and a cap and ball 36, in the leg. The 22 guy was sore for a while, the 36 guy almost bled out.
 

Billy Boy

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Whilst I was in the Navy and stationed in Idaho Falls another sailor returned from sick leave. The reason for the sick leave was because he purchased a .44 cap and ball revolver, drove out into the desert and tried to practice quick draw. 50 miles from nowhere this fellow pulled it from his holster and promptly shot a hole in his right foot. This was in a time before cell phones. Imagine having to drive yourself 50 miles in a standard shift vehicle. I don't know how he did but I'll bet it was in first gear all the way.

Keep you finger out of the trigger guard.
Ho swabby, how far from the coast were you stationed in Idaho?
 
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