Fat Doe with my Kibler 54

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Flint.

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I got a nice big doe on Tuesday with my Kibler .54 Colonial. First time shooting at a deer with this gun. Using a .530 RB with a .015 patch over 80 grains 3F GOEX. The shot was about 60 yards. She sure had a lot of fat. I saved about 5 pounds of it to make some patch lube.
 

Fatboyz

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View attachment 178224 I got a nice big doe on Tuesday with my Kibler .54 Colonial. First time shooting at a deer with this gun. Using a .530 RB with a .015 patch over 80 grains 3F GOEX. The shot was about 60 yards. She sure had a lot of fat. I saved about 5 pounds of it to make some patch lube.
I saved some fat off my Flintlock buck as well. Are you just going to mix it with some bees wax? That was my thought for mine.
 

TDM

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This will be my first time making some as well.
Making tallow is very straightforward. It can be done inside but I prefer outside over a propane cooker. Find a relatively large, heavy pot. Size just depends on how much fat you want to process at a time. Add just enough water to cover the bottom maybe a 1/4" or less. Cut your fat into thumb or finger sized pieces. Put it in the pot and adjust to medium heat. The water is there just to protect the fat from browning before it starts to melt and it will all boil away in the rendering process. Low to medium heat is all you need, slowly the fat will start to liquefy. Reduce heat as it starts to melt. Use a ladle to dip out the tallow and have several glass or metal containers ready to pour it into. Depending on how much fat you have all this takes 20-30 minutes. This is same rendering process as making Lard.
 

Flint.

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Making tallow is very straightforward. It can be done inside but I prefer outside over a propane cooker. Find a relatively large, heavy pot. Size just depends on how much fat you want to process at a time. Add just enough water to cover the bottom maybe a 1/4" or less. Cut your fat into thumb or finger sized pieces. Put it in the pot and adjust to medium heat. The water is there just to protect the fat from browning before it starts to melt and it will all boil away in the rendering process. Low to medium heat is all you need, slowly the fat will start to liquefy. Reduce heat as it starts to melt. Use a ladle to dip out the tallow and have several glass or metal containers ready to pour it into. Depending on how much fat you have all this takes 20-30 minutes. This is same rendering process as making Lard.
Thanks TDM! After it cools and solidifies, would you use it as is for patch lube or mix it with beeswax or other ingredients? If mixing, what proportion?
 

TDM

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Thanks TDM! After it cools and solidifies, would you use it as is for patch lube or mix it with beeswax or other ingredients? If mixing, what proportion?
In warm weather it can be used straight as a patch lube.
But I mix 50/50 tallow/beeswax and then add oil to get the consistency I want. Less oil in the summer, more oil in the winter. You have to let it cool and solidify to test the consistency. Just reheat in a toaster oven or double boiler and add a little oil until you get what you want. But I usually end up with pretty much equal parts of each. And the oil is your choice, olive, canola, vegetable. Any unsalted tallow will work, but deer tallow is favored. You can substitute Crisco for tallow also, you'll just need less oil.
 

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