Experimental Archaeology

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smo

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Sorry if I misled you....
Granny Toothman, isn’t my Granny... lol

That sweater is in the Museum of the Appalachia in East Tn...

However if my Wife or I ever decide too take spinning, We have our own source of fiber.....

CE40C793-B932-4813-96FA-998E7FABFD23.jpeg


Great dogs aren’t they!
 

Tallswife

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Sorry if I misled you....
Granny Toothman, isn’t my Granny... lol

That sweater is in the Museum of the Appalachia in East Tn...

However if my Wife or I ever decide too take spinning, We have our own source of fiber.....

View attachment 67023

Great dogs aren’t they!
yes they are!! And thank you for the clarification
 
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GREENSWLDE

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Local chap had one. We all called it his Pyrenean Hearth Rug, were it was usually found. We don't have your sort of white stuff very often here.
 

Tallswife

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This is MoMo who generously donated her fleece to make this project possible. She looks blond on the outside but is a reddish brown underneath.
502FD427-8310-4058-8DEF-93907A13DB36.jpeg
 
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Nice sweater, A few years back we had a Old English sheep dog, Their fur is very expensive to purchase for weaving projects.
 
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His name was Chauncey smartest dog I ever seen and hard headed, grooming intensive dog, he made it 15 years hips got very bad he now sits in the family room at a place of honor in a small wooden box. Dearly missed.
 

Jay Templin

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The red haired lad, "Young" Ian, mentioned when Claire said she didn't knit or weave, that all boys and girls in Scotland learned to knit stockings from a very young age.

This thread has caused me to wonder if something like that was true on the American frontier as well?
Even in town, it was common for children -boys as well as girls- to begin learning to sew and knit as early as age two. There’s a marvelous journal entry from a man in York County, Virginia in 1775 who was visiting a friend and noted that the friend’s 4 year old sat there the whole afternoon, knitting stockings for the family. It is important to remember, though, that most clothing was purchased- as an example, shirts were typically sold ready to wear in sets of 6 or 12, because a shirt was rarely worn more than once before laundering. There were also weavers to whom you could bring your homespun thread and weavers that travelled a circuit; for a professional, producing a yard a day of plain twilled stuff was pretty standard. (I’ve never been that fast, myself!)
A family’s time and labour, especially on a frontier farm, was far more profitably spent on any number of things other than making garments that could be gotten up more quickly and cheaply by professionals.
Jay
 

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Tallswife

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Dumb question for you Dear Lady,

Are the coverings on the sheep meant to keep the wool clean or maybe to help them in cold weather?

Gus
Not dumb at all! Yes, its to keep the fleece clean. Its a light weight nylon coat and it keeps the hay and other bits of nature out of the wool. Each sheep goes thru 4-5 coat changes during the year, each coat bigger than the last to accomidate the growing fleece. We are in the process of changing out coats right now, and we will be shearing in about 6 weeks. Some of the sheep have 5-6" long fiber now. Our recent very cold snap has kicked fleece growth into overdrive.
 

Artificer

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Not dumb at all! Yes, its to keep the fleece clean. Its a light weight nylon coat and it keeps the hay and other bits of nature out of the wool. Each sheep goes thru 4-5 coat changes during the year, each coat bigger than the last to accomidate the growing fleece. We are in the process of changing out coats right now, and we will be shearing in about 6 weeks. Some of the sheep have 5-6" long fiber now. Our recent very cold snap has kicked fleece growth into overdrive.
Thank you Dear Lady,

I had no clue.

Gus
 

Brokennock

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Even in town, it was common for children -boys as well as girls- to begin learning to sew and knit as early as age two. There’s a marvelous journal entry from a man in York County, Virginia in 1775 who was visiting a friend and noted that the friend’s 4 year old sat there the whole afternoon, knitting stockings for the family. It is important to remember, though, that most clothing was purchased- as an example, shirts were typically sold ready to wear in sets of 6 or 12, because a shirt was rarely worn more than once before laundering. There were also weavers to whom you could bring your homespun thread and weavers that travelled a circuit; for a professional, producing a yard a day of plain twilled stuff was pretty standard. (I’ve never been that fast, myself!)
A family’s time and labour, especially on a frontier farm, was far more profitably spent on any number of things other than making garments that could be gotten up more quickly and cheaply by professionals.
Jay
Thank you. Good point that really should have a topic of own.
I see this with many of the items, clothing and gear, we use in our historical endeavors, everyone expects to make everything themselves and seems to come at it from an angle that thos was the way things were. (It all too often also gets used as an excuse for poorly done or fantasy work)
Fact is the colonies were very much a consumer and trade society. At the heart of it, by the 1700s most of our "historical events" had something to do with trade and commerce issues.

That said, someone had to do the work and Tallswife is doing a fantastic job of showing us what went into it. Along with that, maybe showing us why we were such ready consumers,,,,
 

Tallswife

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The fiber group that I am involved with does whats called "Sheep to Shawl" competitions. Thats where we have 6 hours to spin enough fiber and weave a complete adult size shawl. There are 6 of us on the team to accomplish this. Part of what we are judged on is community outreach with an educational display. A few years ago at the Estes Park Wool Market, we did a presentation called "Girls with Balls" We took 3 different historical looks at different times and I was tasked with the research and write up of 2 of them. One was on WWII and the knitting push for the troops they called "Knit your Bit" and the second one I did was "The Daughters of Liberty" which touches upon the aspect that @Jay Templin presented, and also the use of fiber arts as protest. Here is what I wrote up for that. The pictures below are our team, and our educational display. BTW we did not win this one

The Daughters of Liberty

by Judy Schappaugh

The Daughters of Liberty is a group of patriotic women who worked with their counterparts, The Sons of Liberty, in the protest of both the Stamp Acts, and later, the Townshend Acts. Both Acts taxed the British imports to the colonies of glass, lead, paint, paper, tea, and textiles. Both groups felt that taxation without representation was unfair and detrimental to the colonies.

The Daughters of Liberty was both an organized group of women, and a general term used for any woman who defined herself as a patriot. There were many chapters throughout the New England area. There is some question as to the date the organization was formed, its estimated to be between 1766-1768. The first mention in the press of the group was in 1766.

The group was the driving force behind the multiple boycotts of British imports, from tea to textiles. In 1768 Boston merchants created an agreement to not import British products, thus creating shortages in the colonies. To ease the shortage of textiles the Daughters of Liberty stepped to their spinning wheels and looms to create the textiles needed by the colonists.

“Women took to their spinning wheels – what had been a chore for solitary women, spinning wool into yarn, weaving yarn into cloth, now became a public political act. Ninety-two ‘Daughters of Liberty’ brought their wheels to the meeting house in Newport, spending the day spinning together until they produced 170 skeins of yarn. Making and wearing homespun cloth became political acts of resistance.”

The American Revolution: A Concise History
Spinning bee’s, spinning competitions, public spinning, and weaving, all became ways to protest British rule and taxation. By 1774 the determination of these patriotic women influenced the Continental Congress to officially boycott all British goods. As the colonies crept closer to all-out war with Britain, the need for uniforms grew, and our foremothers filled that need with handspun, and woven cloth.

Let us remember these ladies of civil disobedience and their many contributions to our country….

Sarah Bradlee Fulton, Phoebe Fraunces, Esther Reed, Sybil Ludington, Rebecca Flower Young, Susan Boudinot, Mary Ludwig Hays, Deborah Sampson, Lydia Darrah, Nancy Hart, Emily Geiger, Rebecca Motte, Prudence Wright, and so many other women who’s names have been lost to history.

Yet not alone by men reclaimed
Brave women too achieved their part
With courage, love and loyalty,
They bore war’s cruel smart
We turn no printed page to-day,
Their gracious deeds to magnify
Within our hearts their memories rest,
Their influence cannot die.
We raise this modest table stone
Our sister’s name and fame to keep
The impress of her noble life
Ends not with a dreamless sleep –
May we be wise and ever prize,
The lessons taught us here,
That freedom comes by sacrifice
And duty knows no fear.
Mary Jane Seymour

They were American Patriots, young and old, rich and poor, north and south.
They are The Daughters of Liberty

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