Experimental Archaeology

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Cannon
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That is one way to do it, another way is called Waulking, where a group of, usually ladies. would save their urine and pour it over the cloth. They would then move it back and forth, beating it lightly on a table, while singing rythmic songs as they move the cloth along. I wont be going that far with this project. I'll be soaking it in hot water and giving it some agitation to tighten the weave. I dont want to turn it into a felted piece.

Below is info on Waulking

Wool Waulking
For fans of the "Outlander" Series, they may remember this scene:

Outlander "Wool Waulking Song" - YouTube

Gus
 

Brokennock

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Wow! Absolutely fantastic topic and post @Tallswife
Thank you so much for sharing.
I would love a copy of the final documentation when you are done. Having it available in PDF or WORD form as well as paper would be great. I'd gladly buy a copy either way.

I recently saw a picture of some little girls during the depression wearing feed and flour sack dresses. This makes even those seem like a blessing.
 

Tallswife

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Wow! Absolutely fantastic topic and post @Tallswife
Thank you so much for sharing.
I would love a copy of the final documentation when you are done. Having it available in PDF or WORD form as well as paper would be great. I'd gladly buy a copy either way.

I recently saw a picture of some little girls during the depression wearing feed and flour sack dresses. This makes even those seem like a blessing.
Thank you, I would be happy to get you a copy.

One neat thing about the flour sacks, once the flour mills realized that people were using the cloth bags for clothing, they made sure that their painted on lable would be able to wash off and they made efforts to send the same fabric prints in a group so the ladies could get enough of the same pattern for a complete dress.
 

springfield art

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One of the things that I do for demonstrations at events is to show historic spinning and fiber arts. Quite often the conversations with the public turn to clothing. Questions I often get are what was availiable to purchase, how was the clothing constructed, what fabrics were commonly used, and did people make their own clothing at home and if so, how long did a piece of clothing take to make. That last one I have not been able to answer to my own satisfaction. So, for the fun of it, and because I have nothing better to do with my time, I decided to recreate an 18th C wool petticoat from sheep to finished garment and document the process. As of now, i'm a little better than half way thru the process.

Fun facts of the project to date:

1 Moorit sheep fleece from a lovely ewe named MoMo
It took me 1 hr 10 mins to skirt the fleece
It took me 6 hours to pick the fleece and wash it
It took me 36 1/2 hours to comb the fiber into a spinnable form
I have spent 107 hours spinning so far and may need to spin some more
I filled 9 bobbins on my wheel with a single strand of yarn
I spun 6500 yards of 2 ply yarn
It took 7 hours to warp a 4 shaft loom with a 3-over straight draft pattern
The warp is 6 yards long
Ive spent 18 1/2 hours weaving so far.
I am not the fastest weaver on the planet. Ive been working on this project for about 2 years now, and we did move an entire farm in the middle of it.

Once the weaving is done, I will full the cloth. Then it will be cut into 4 panels and those will be stitched together to make the skirt part. I will also need to spin and weave the top binding/ties. The hem will be stitched up. All that will be done by hand.

Some pics of the project.

View attachment 66681View attachment 66682View attachment 66683View attachment 66684View attachment 66685View attachment 66687
Amazing! The patience required! Wow!
 

Nameless Hunter

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Impressive!
My wife used to do a similar "start to finish" demonstration many years ago when she lived/worked on a plantation outside Charleston, SC. At one point she researched and recreated the growing, production and use of indigo. The job didn't pay much but she enjoyed the work/lifestyle. Making cloth from scratch is a very impressive skill, IMO.
 

Tallswife

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Do not know about the flour sacs but I can remember when I raised hogs the hog feed came in printed 50 lb. cloth bags, My grand mother would use them for different clothing projects.
Very cool! Do you still have any of her pieces?
 

Tallswife

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Impressive!
My wife used to do a similar "start to finish" demonstration many years ago when she lived/worked on a plantation outside Charleston, SC. At one point she researched and recreated the growing, production and use of indigo. The job didn't pay much but she enjoyed the work/lifestyle. Making cloth from scratch is a very impressive skill, IMO.
Thank you! Kudos to your wife for her projects!!
 

Jaeger

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One of the things that I do for demonstrations at events is to show historic spinning and fiber arts. Quite often the conversations with the public turn to clothing. Questions I often get are what was availiable to purchase, how was the clothing constructed, what fabrics were commonly used, and did people make their own clothing at home and if so, how long did a piece of clothing take to make. That last one I have not been able to answer to my own satisfaction. So, for the fun of it, and because I have nothing better to do with my time, I decided to recreate an 18th C wool petticoat from sheep to finished garment and document the process. As of now, i'm a little better than half way thru the process.

Fun facts of the project to date:

1 Moorit sheep fleece from a lovely ewe named MoMo
It took me 1 hr 10 mins to skirt the fleece
It took me 6 hours to pick the fleece and wash it
It took me 36 1/2 hours to comb the fiber into a spinnable form
I have spent 107 hours spinning so far and may need to spin some more
I filled 9 bobbins on my wheel with a single strand of yarn
I spun 6500 yards of 2 ply yarn
It took 7 hours to warp a 4 shaft loom with a 3-over straight draft pattern
The warp is 6 yards long
Ive spent 18 1/2 hours weaving so far.
I am not the fastest weaver on the planet. Ive been working on this project for about 2 years now, and we did move an entire farm in the middle of it.

Once the weaving is done, I will full the cloth. Then it will be cut into 4 panels and those will be stitched together to make the skirt part. I will also need to spin and weave the top binding/ties. The hem will be stitched up. All that will be done by hand.

Some pics of the project.

View attachment 66681View attachment 66682View attachment 66683View attachment 66684View attachment 66685View attachment 66687
VERY good post.....and, er......thread. So much information, great pics.....you've done a lot of good work!
 
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Tallswife, sadly no, there were quilts she made and I am sure some of the material came from the feed sacs, her last years of her life she lived with a son in Fredericksburg Va. and those sort of things may have went with her. ( never to be seen after her passing)The only thing I have that was hers is a old bone handled eating knife that is well worn and greatly cherished. I was in the Marine Corps when she had a sale and could not go, my father ask if there was anything I wanted told him the knife, I have a aunt that said I would never get it so I told my dad go too a thousand dollars on the knife, ( he sounded shocked when I told him that)he told my aunt the day of the sale and she just grumbled something and walked away, toot my grandmother (nick name) wanted to give m the knife according to my dad) but I knew she would need the money, He told me my aunt stopped bidding at 15 dollars. Great family ya know.
 
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