Early 1800's Fork

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Crewdawg445

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Been in the family for awhile and remember seeing it at my grandmother's house as a child. My mother passed it on my way yesterday and obviously was tickled to death. Best I can find is early 1800's?

Walnut scales, single iron pin and poured pewter decorative designs. Beautiful little fork! It's the lite trinkets such as this that spark excitement and curiosity on it's past.



 

Nativearizonan

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I have a few of those, just like that but every one with a different pewter design poured into the handle. I picked them up at a couple different yard sales, and don't know any of the history. I definitely would be interested in hearing what others think about the age and why.
 

BullRunBear

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Nice family memento. My hometown was established about 20 years after Plymouth and I was lucky enough to grow up able to see these domestic items, the changing architecture and fashions in home life, etc. I suspect these things sparked my interest in history which eventually included BP weapons and accessories. This in turn led to curiosity about how they fed themselves (gardening, fishing and hunting), produced cloth and clothing (curing pelts, weaving and sewing/knitting), made tools and building materials (blacksmithing, knowledge of trees) and many other matters.

All this can start with a simple fork or candle mold. Kind of cool.

Jeff
 

Black Hand

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BullRunBear said:
Nice family memento. My hometown was established about 20 years after Plymouth and I was lucky enough to grow up able to see these domestic items, the changing architecture and fashions in home life, etc. I suspect these things sparked my interest in history which eventually included BP weapons and accessories. This in turn led to curiosity about how they fed themselves (gardening, fishing and hunting), produced cloth and clothing (curing pelts, weaving and sewing/knitting), made tools and building materials (blacksmithing, knowledge of trees) and many other matters.

All this can start with a simple fork or candle mold. Kind of cool.

Jeff
I think mine started with a book - The Mystic Warriors of the Plains by Thomas Mails.
 

Crewdawg445

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Not entirely sure, it's certainly not a child's fork as I've seen some of those. I'll have to take some measurements.

Lucky my mother is also into period antiques and primitives!
 

Rifleman1776

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As nice as that keepsake is, it is a very common fork. I have several and they are often found in antique shops and flea markets.
 

tenngun

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Lots in antique stores and junk shops around here... but never a spoon, I wonder why.
I mostly just carry a spoon any more to events or trekking.
 

Crewdawg445

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It'll get used! Already found it's space within my market wallet along with my horn spoon.
 

Scott_C

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Pretty sure those stamped forks and knives are 1850s on. Prior to the industrial revolution they were forged and still partially round/oval instead of flat.
 

Artificer

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It will be interesting to see if some of this kind of forks/knives come up on the excavation of the Steamboat Malta, that sank in the Missouri in 1841. I don't believe the OP's fork is quite that early, but it would be a neat surprise, if so.

Right now, these are fine forks and knives for Civil War Era reenacting, but I'm not comfortable going further back than that.

Gus
 

Scott_C

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wweedman

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The sheet steel forks were available only after the Bessemer steel process made inexpensive steel available. Before that sheet manufactured forks did not have the strength, they were manufactured but uncommon and not popular. The pewter decorated tableware received a patent circa 1868.
 
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