Dye for a frock coat

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Brokennock

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Haven't tried this yet, but it is on my list of things to get and do;

They have other natural eyes, and a page of mordants available. Often the same natural dye can give different colors depending on the mordant used. There is plenty of good info throughout their website.

If you get something from them and try it, please report back.
 

Brokennock

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Haven't tried this yet, but it is on my list of things to get and do;

They have other natural eyes, and a page of mordants available. Often the same natural dye can give different colors depending on the mordant used. There is plenty of good info throughout their website.

If you get something from them and try it, please report back.
Well well that is interesting, I never had a link do that before...
 

Loyalist Dave

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Got a nice frock coat for Christmas. It’s white linen. I’d like to color it a light tan or brown.
What to use?
A handful of tea bags in a tub of water is commonly used.
Today maybe but a bit pricey back in the day, no? 😁

IF you want a brown that is pretty colorfast, you need to use black walnut hulls. The good news they are very color fast, but the bad news is they aren't free until fall. You make an even better color IF you take a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and water, and rust up a chunk of old steel wool, and add the rusty liquid into the water that you use for the dye bath. The iron oxide acts as a mordant [sticking agent] for the dye molecules. You boil some water, dump in the vinegar-rust water, then drop walnuts with crushed green outer covering into the water, and let it soak. Meanwhile you get your garment wet then wring it out, so it's damp. When the dye is cool (don't want to shrink your garment) you add the damp garment to the dye bath. It should be loose and you will need a stick to move it around to be sure you get all of it exposed to the dye. You don't want a tie-died shirt effect, right? :oops: Remove it, dunk it in a bucket of clean water then hang it up to drip dry. You might want to rinse it a second time, and drip dry again.

You will end up with a dull brown, and...no color "brighteners" or anything that will make you "pop" to the eyesight of a deer. 😉

LD
 

Atticus69

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Today maybe but a bit pricey back in the day, no? 😁

IF you want a brown that is pretty colorfast, you need to use black walnut hulls. The good news they are very color fast, but the bad news is they aren't free until fall. You make an even better color IF you take a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and water, and rust up a chunk of old steel wool, and add the rusty liquid into the water that you use for the dye bath. The iron oxide acts as a mordant [sticking agent] for the dye molecules. You boil some water, dump in the vinegar-rust water, then drop walnuts with crushed green outer covering into the water, and let it soak. Meanwhile you get your garment wet then wring it out, so it's damp. When the dye is cool (don't want to shrink your garment) you add the damp garment to the dye bath. It should be loose and you will need a stick to move it around to be sure you get all of it exposed to the dye. You don't want a tie-died shirt effect, right? :oops: Remove it, dunk it in a bucket of clean water then hang it up to drip dry. You might want to rinse it a second time, and drip dry again.

You will end up with a dull brown, and...no color "brighteners" or anything that will make you "pop" to the eyesight of a deer. 😉

LD
I have boiled in green walnut hulls to get olive green and hickory hulls to get a light tan.
 
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