drilling touch hole and need to line it?

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tenngun

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Most old guns just had a hole drilled inthe barrel.
Some had a inner coning I’ve not tried but looks like a PIA to do.
Some had an outer coning.
Liners seem to have been rare, or placed when the original burned out. Top quality guns, sold to the rich might have gold or platinum liners by late eighteenth century.
When you say just a noise maker a single 1/16 hole will work well, but it does produce a little slowe fire then a lined gun.
I shot a gun for years without a liner and it worked well
 

Dismount

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Most old guns just had a hole drilled inthe barrel.
Some had a inner coning I’ve not tried but looks like a PIA to do.
Some had an outer coning.
Liners seem to have been rare, or placed when the original burned out. Top quality guns, sold to the rich might have gold or platinum liners by late eighteenth century.
When you say just a noise maker a single 1/16 hole will work well, but it does produce a little slowe fire then a lined gun.
I shot a gun for years without a liner and it worked well
eat thank you
 

Notchy Bob

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I would agree with @tenngun on all points.

In my opinion, vent liners are overrated. Others are welcome to disagree. If you have a swamped barrel with a very thick sidewall at the breech, a liner coned on the inside may improve ignition. If the barrel wall is .250" or less, the liner is not necessary and may even be a liability. Danny Caywood will not put them in any of the guns he makes, and I'm pretty sure he will not honor the warranty on any of his guns that have an aftermarket vent liner installed.

A lot of gunmakers now install them as a matter of course. I've had two custom guns arrive with vent liners installed despite the fact that I specifically requested that they not be put in. One of these guns had some other features I didn't like and I sold it without even shooting it. On the other one, a rifle with a .50 caliber x 7/8" barrel, the liner was left protruding into the bore so there was no way to get a jag, brush, or breech face scraper all the way to the breech. The vent liner created a fouling trap that was very difficult to clean. This was a White Lightnin' liner with the countersunk shoulder. I don't know how many threads that left in the barrel wall, but I was never comfortable with it.

I have four flintlock firearms right now. None have vent liners, and all have excellent ignition.

On the positive side, in addition to improved ignition in thick-walled barrels, vent liners coned on the inside may give the firearm improved performance. The cone on the inside brings some of the powder in the main charge closer to the priming flash. The real value of this is that it enables using a smaller touch hole while still getting good ignition. The smaller hole reduces the amount of gas leakage and pressure loss. The result is higher velocity and more energy imparted to the bullet.

However, depending on the dimensions of your bore and breech, you probably won't need a vent liner for your "noise maker."

Notchy Bob

P.S.: I just noticed this post is in the "Cannons" sub forum. My comments pertain to small arms. Are vent liners put in cannons? Maybe the post was entered in the wrong section? I apologize if my remarks were about the wrong type of gun!
 
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