Does anyone rust blue a hawk

Discussion in 'The Craftsman' started by Kilted Cowboy, May 13, 2019.

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  1. May 13, 2019 #1

    Kilted Cowboy

    Kilted Cowboy

    Kilted Cowboy

    Pilgrim

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    Just got a hand forged hawk and was contemplating finishes to protect metal and enhance. was thinking about using some LMF barrel brown solution on it . Has anyone done this or any other ideas?
     
  2. May 13, 2019 #2

    S.Kenton

    S.Kenton

    S.Kenton

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    I did my Iroquois hawk I got from TOW. I browned it, if I had it to do over again I would have blued it and rubbed it back.
     
  3. May 14, 2019 #3

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776

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    I used Brownell's Oxypho blue on mine four or five decades back. Still looks good.
     
  4. May 15, 2019 #4

    Brokennock

    Brokennock

    Brokennock

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    I use distilled white vinegar on many of my high carbon blades. Degrease thoroughly and completely submerge. Comes out a nice dove gray to charcoal grey depending on time soaked and steel make up. It's also food safe unlike old blue solutions. All my knives wind up in contact with food at some point, and my hawk gets used to disassemble game.
    Vinegar is also cheap.
     
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  5. May 15, 2019 #5

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

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    I have used both Birchwood Casey Super Blue and Plumb Brown. You just have to heat the hawk head in the oven to around 220 degrees so the solution sizzles when applied to get the best affect. Cool and wash with soapy water, steel wool with 0000, and oil. Or if you want you can leave un-oiled for a few days and it will darken a bit more, then steel wool with 0000 and oil.

    Here is a photo of one browned.

    DSC03374-1.JPG

    Here is a photo of one blued.

    006-1-3.jpg
     
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  6. May 15, 2019 #6

    Zonie

    Zonie

    Zonie

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    As a side comment for anyone using Plum Brown, Birchwood Casey's instructions say the temperature should be 280°F for it to work like it should.
     
  7. May 16, 2019 #7

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

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    Zonie,
    Thanks for the correct info. I knew it was 200 degrees plus but couldn't remember the exact temperature. I should have researched.
     
  8. Aug 11, 2019 #8

    Trade knife J

    Trade knife J

    Trade knife J

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    That top hawk in really great looking! May I ask who made it?
     
  9. Aug 27, 2019 #9

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

    Shiloh1944

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    They are both the same styled Cold Steel hawks that I customized.
     
  10. Sep 1, 2019 #10

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

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    Just some food for thought, although there were some fancy hawks made for smoking and showing off, hawks were generally tools for chopping wood, quartering game, even digging holes in an emergency.
    A bit of mustard rubbed on (vinegar the active ingredient) wiped off the next day gives a good mottled brownish color. A few stokes of the file gives a shinny edge and a bit of oil or bees wax on the handle gives a cared for but working tool look.
     
  11. Sep 17, 2019 #11

    fjrdoc

    fjrdoc

    fjrdoc

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    I just finished making my first hawk from Track of the Wolf. I used Laurel Mountain Forge cold browning. I layed down 3 applications without carding between. Afterwards, I aggressively scuffed the finish back with a red Scotchbrite pad for an antiqued finish. I flame hardened the handle and stained with Aqua fortis. Made some 18th century boiled linseed oil with lead carbonate and finished it with beeswax.
    The handle isn't the best fit on the head but it will work for clearing a shooting lane for deer season this year.
     

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  12. Sep 17, 2019 #12

    Nessmuck56

    Nessmuck56

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    I just got 2 more throwing hawks from Beaver Bill...got the nephews throwing hawks and knives !
     
  13. Oct 24, 2019 #13

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

    Daryl Crawford

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    I like the sound of trying vinegar. Thanks for that tip.
     

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