Do you dry fire your ROA?

Muzzleloading Forum

Help Support Muzzleloading Forum:

Joined
Aug 26, 2022
Messages
244
Reaction score
550
Location
PA
With a properly set up revolver the hammer never touches the nipples, which is why Ruger made their statement.
I realize that the firearm is a well designed and manufactured piece. What concerns me is that the tolerance of hammer to nipple must be pretty tight be able to strike hard enough to ignite the cap but to not contact the nipple.

As TreeMan said, parts are scarce. I searched the web before I bought mine just to see what is available...the answer, not much.

They may end up being like older cars and motorcycles...worth more to part out than to sell one that might not be in the greatest shape. Not there yet I suppose but ya never know.

They were made in so many configurations over the many years of manufacture, I would love to have an example of each...but I haven't won the lottery...yet. Though today I will be picking up my second one from my dealer. The first is a 7.5" stainless with the warning on the barrel. The one I pick up tonight is a blued 7.5" no warning. I would love a 5" fixed sight version and an original with the brass grip frame would be very sweet. I read that many were fitted with the brass grip frame at a later date. Don't know how one would determine if a brasser was original..??
 

TDM

69 Cal.
MLF Supporter
Joined
May 28, 2022
Messages
3,284
Reaction score
5,886
Location
Louisiana & My camp in Mississippi
As said by @TreeMan its unnecessary wear on the hammer with nothing to absorb the shock. If you really want to dry fire buy a bag of vacuum line covers at your local auto parts store and trim them to length. Slide them on the nipples and you'll have a nice rubber cap to pound away on.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2021
Messages
4,476
Reaction score
2,035
There is a comic called Spawn. The character seems to have unlimited super powers, but it turns out that using even small amounts of the power will over time cause it to run out. Mechanical devices especially those with moving parts, have only so many clicks and whirrs until they break. Some have a great many like a jeweled watch and others like a bomb have one. I wouldn’t waste my clicks on dry firing the ROA if I had one, but if it gives you as much joy to do so as it does to make it go bang for real, or some combination of the two, I say dry fire away and damn the torpedoes.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2018
Messages
3,728
Reaction score
4,150
I don't dry fire anything but I'm also not a Match shooter , and I often go to the range and waste bullets in muzzleloaders and revolvers with some temporary CHS syndrome

I'd say just remove the nipples and click away
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2021
Messages
172
Reaction score
200
I realize that the firearm is a well designed and manufactured piece. What concerns me is that the tolerance of hammer to nipple must be pretty tight be able to strike hard enough to ignite the cap but to not contact the nipple.

As TreeMan said, parts are scarce. I searched the web before I bought mine just to see what is available...the answer, not much.

They may end up being like older cars and motorcycles...worth more to part out than to sell one that might not be in the greatest shape. Not there yet I suppose but ya never know.

They were made in so many configurations over the many years of manufacture, I would love to have an example of each...but I haven't won the lottery...yet. Though today I will be picking up my second one from my dealer. The first is a 7.5" stainless with the warning on the barrel. The one I pick up tonight is a blued 7.5" no warning. I would love a 5" fixed sight version and an original with the brass grip frame would be very sweet. I read that many were fitted with the brass grip frame at a later date. Don't know how one would determine if a brasser was original..??
For $10.00 you can get a factory letter that will describe just how it left the factory and where it went.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2018
Messages
3,728
Reaction score
4,150
If I'm dropping the hammer on a BP gun , I'm expecting to hear a bang.

When or If I start getting into match shooting where 1/16" make a difference I guess I'll be doing Penny Drills in my basement with percussion revolvers and rifles

People have been dry firing guns since forever, John Wesley Hardin could be heard clicking away practicing his quick draws and trigger pulls but he also basically killed people for a living . The British Army did lots of dry fire with Flintlocks with wood blocks in the Jaws and brass covers over nipples but that was to keep soldiers skills sharp so they could win wars and the British Govt didn't have to use powder and lead to train every day. If something broke in a lock from 1000s of cycles they had armorers to fix it. I'd rather not cock and fire my $1000 rifles 200 times per day unless it's the fun way and big bullets are going down range
 

ZUG

Pilgrim
Joined
Apr 11, 2005
Messages
2,136
Reaction score
799
Location
CA
I don't subject any of my guns to abuse and to me dry firing without some kind of protection on the nipples or in the case of a centerfire gun snap caps. You do as you please it's your gun:ghostly::ThankYou:
 

45D

45 Cal.
Joined
Aug 21, 2021
Messages
733
Reaction score
1,257
I don't subject any of my guns to abuse and to me dry firing without some kind of protection on the nipples or in the case of a centerfire gun snap caps. You do as you please it's your gun:ghostly::ThankYou:

If an open top is setup correctly to allow dry firing, obviously there won't be any damage to the nipples. The frame takes the impact. Likewise, if a Remington is setup as dry firing the frame takes the hit as well but it will eventually deform (bend / gouge) on both sides of the top of the hammer slot. Reducing the main spring will help with this ( about 4 lb hammer draw is as light as you should go for reliability on cap guns). The action should be "optimized" to be reliable if you choose this. The open top will benefit from a reduced main spring as well.
I do regularly ( since I don't get to shoot as often as I'd like to) cycle with snap caps (my own of course ) both for muscle memory and " continuing/ extended product tests". Many times "fanning" is involved (which isn't abuse if it's set up for it ).

Mike
 

M. De Land

75 Cal.
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
7,242
Reaction score
2,054
I detest turn lines. they show up enough just firing a revolver. i have no reason to dry fire. can stand on my porch 24/7 and fire so thats what i do.
I don't ever remember seeing a single action that gets used a lot without a rub line to some extent. Long as they don't gall and the line is only a rub line they will work well with the added benefit of slowing cylinder inertia into lock up.
Rugers virtually all start life with an early bolt drop knowing full well they will eventially be that way any way.
Some common reasons are bolt finger/leg and cam wear over time and use . The only out of time that hurts is if the hand is to long and pushes the cylinder before the bolt is clear of the notch. This peens out the top back side of the cylinder notch. This is why the rub line often starts/ appears just out of lock up.
 

Latest posts

Top