Dew rags

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Black Hand

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Find a solid-colored silk bandanna - you can find them at various vendors and Western clothing stores.
 

Loyalist Dave

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They make for crappy head covering (imho) except in time of emergency....,

They don't shade the sun, nor stop the rain from running into the eyes, though they will soak up some sweat, and in cold weather would keep you warmer than no hat at all.

I have a gray neckerchief to which I sewed a half-piece (triangle) of blaze orange ..., it's for my neck without the orange showing...., , unless for some reason I get out to my hunting area with my flinter, and find that I have forgotten my proper blaze orange hat, then it goes on my head, or if I have only my hat and I'm missing my blaze orange vest, then it gets opened to the orange, and it goes around my neck. Sometimes I place it with the orange showing on the opposite side of a large tree which is right behind me, so anybody coming from that side of the tree (the tree is blocking them from seeing my orange) will know a hunter is near.

LD
 

Boomerang

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Loyalist Dave said:
They don't shade the sun, nor stop the rain from running into the eyes, though they will soak up some sweat, and in cold weather would keep you warmer than no hat at all. LD
Ya I thought it would work good on hot days to keep the sweat from running down your face nd still be historically correct when shooting woods walks and such.
 

Black Hand

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I never wear a brimmed hat, rather 2 silk scarves worn turban-style. I find this most comfortable...
 

tenngun

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I hate a brim on my hat. I do own a nice little wheel hat and the brim is small enough not to bother me. I also wear a Scots bonnet, a working mans linen cap, or a Monmouth knitted cap. I was looking an Twonsends shifting the past web site. One of the drawings is an eighteenth century street scene from London whit a young lady spreading some sort of handbill. To her side there is a man in why looks like a small brined wheel hat. This is some years before I understood they became popular.
 

Stophel

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Bandanas ("Bandanoes")/handkerchiefs were super common, worn tied around the neck. I've seen references to them tied on the head. There are many portraits of people wearing them "turban style", which I have not figured out yet... Most of these people were probably wearing them to cover their shaved bald heads. Plenty of early 19th century images of Indians wearing them this way.

18th century images show patterns, checks, and spotted designs. Burnley and Trowbridge carry reproduction spotted and printed bandanoes. http://www.burnleyandtrowbridge.com/neck-handkerchiefs.aspx

Here's a nice original one I just now stumbled upon:



For solid color silk, look for "cowboy wild rags", silk kerchiefs close to 36" square. Easily found on ebay.
 
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jrmflintlock

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I would love to see a photo of how your Blaze orange is attached. I can picture it in use but a photo would be great!
 

Loyalist Dave

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I'll get my [strike]local IT expert[/strike], I mean my 18 year old son, and get him to help me learn how to download photos..., :redface:

Wish me luck :wink:

LD
 

Elkeater

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Cowboy silk scarfs are warmer than cotton and breath well in summer.

On line: Murdach's orange silk scarfs. Although Colorado now permits pink along with orange for hunter safety.
 

hunts4deer

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They were simply called Handkerchiefs or Neck Cloths. Worn normally on the neck. An 18th C reference image for wearing on the head comes from an artist self-protrait in the mirror. In it he has crossed it over in the back and tied it in front on top of the head. Looks much like the 1950s version of Aunt Jemima where she wore one exactly that way. It was being worn while working in his studio, not out in public. As to tying on back "pirate" style, I have never seen any image from 18th century.

I have not seen anything else that indicates it is a good choice as documented wear if you really want to be period correct.
 

Cruzatte

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hunts4deer said:
I have not seen anything else that indicates it is a good choice as documented wear if you really want to be period correct.
I have been searching and searching for this very thing among the French Canadians of the 18th century. Best thing I can come up with are reproduction sketches taken from 19th century artists like Rindisbacher, and Hopkins. Voyager's Sketchbook, Third Edition James A. Hanson p.10 Fur Press, Chadron NE

A Google search doesn't turn up much but several paintings and sketches showing a variety of caps and hats, but no bandannas that I can see.
 

Stophel

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There are many period portraits of men wearing bandanas on their heads. I believe these would even sometimes be made up of two or more bandanas, perhaps purposefully of contrasting colors. I have yet to figure out how the arrangement actually works. I have also seen the "Aunt Jemimah" style, with the knot on the front of the head.









These would be seen on men who were not wearing their wigs... that is, their heads were often shaved bald. The turban/bandana would be worn in lieu of a cap.

These, of course, were gentlemen. Here's a picture of two of the Hoi Polloi wearing their bandana "pirate style"


And no, I have no clue what is going on here. I never understand "British satire"...


Early 19th century images of Indians often show bandanas on their heads.




 

Cruzatte

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These are great!

The only way I know of wearing 2 bandannas is to fold them each into a triangle, then continue folding until you have two broad strips, as though folding for a make shift cravatte. Take the one of the ends of each and tie them together. Place this knot in the center of your forehead, bring the ends behind, then forward crossing the left to right and the right to left. Bring the ends back behind and tie off in a square knot.

Is it more historically representative than pirate style? I have no idea.
 

nhmoose

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I have a friend who is a doctor in charge of a large hospitals emergency room. He shaves his head bald.

He wears a Dew rag or head net because it is the rule.

Scarf on the head keeps it warm OR stops the sweat from getting in your eyes as known it seems for centuries.
 

Redstick Lee

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it keeps ticks, spiders, and wasps (bees/hornets/etc) out of your hair......walk the woods for a day in N.E.Bama and you'll understand why the Southern Cherokee (such as Tree-Frog) and Creek Natives wore them.
 
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