Debating Selling my Indian Bess

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If there is no family memories associated with it(such as it was the gun that several of the family used to get their first deer), then there shouldn't be any reason not to sell it if there is another that would continue to keep you shooting. I had to do that with my unmentionables due to wear & tear from 20+ years as an RN. Personally, the trade gun/fusil always have appealed to me. Glad you got what will keep you going.
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Interesting inletting for the lock - definitely some handwork involved there. Based on past experience, i believe that those metal pieces MAY be the heads of pins: the rear being a trigger pivot pin, and the forward one a pin anchoring the trigger-guard. A secondary characteristic might be to support the tumbler on the lock.
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I put it back together, tested the lock and it would not fire. Not binding anywhere so I looked at the sear, seems it may have not been hardened, looks to be bending upwards a little bit.

Don't know if you all can see the sear and tell that it's angled upwards in these pictures.

Fusil Sear1.jpg


Fusil Sear2.jpg
 
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Yeah looks like it's bent upward. When you put it in the stock did you over tighten the lock screws? They should be snug but not overly tight could be catching or dragging in the stock. Look inside the stock and see if something is dragging in the lock mortise.
 
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Yeah looks like it's bent upward. When you put it in the stock did you over tighten the lock screws? They should be snug but not overly tight could be catching or dragging in the stock. Look inside the stock and see if something is dragging in the lock mortise.
No I'm careful not to over tighten em because I know it can cause binding and other problems. I'll triple check and clean up the mortise around there just in case. I used a needlenose and was able to bend it back down a smidge, took some effort.
 
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Yup, that was the problem. BTW, after closer inspection I know what the two metal pieces are....... Nail heads, one for the trigger guard and the other for the trigger......
You may have to shorten the sear just a little so it doesn't drag. But be careful not to shorten it to much so the trigger won't lit it or slip off.
 

Loyalist Dave

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And buying an Indian Fusil. At 68 years old I'm not going to fight in any more reenactments so considering replacing my 1st Pattern Long Land with a Fusil which I believe would be more accurate with a civilian persona (1760s). Not sure if a civilian (possibly a militia man) would have picked up and kept a Bess during and after the F&I War.
Any ideas?
You need to be more specific on the "where" that your persona has...,

Maryland had armory in Annapolis, and Maryland issued out colony owned Bess to some of the men on the frontier, near Ft. Frederick and Anti Eatam (Antietam).

In Pennsylvania there was no militia system, so very unlikely you would have a Bess there.

In Virginia, the men were to provide their own arms, but the British didn't sell off a bunch of Bess after the F&I, per se. At a lot of the militia musters in Virginia the men declared they didn't have a gun..., there was little if any penalty for not complying with a militia requirement of having a gun and ammo. One very bad historian declared that the militia muster records = a lack of firearms in the hands of the Virginians. :rolleyes: What it actually meant was the men were exempt from serving in the militia since they claimed they didn't have a gun. So the colony would need to provide them with a gun and with ammo IF the colony made them serve. Otherwise they'd serve for no pay, AND pay for their own ball and powder..., 😦 Buying a musket from the British Army or from the colony after the Brits gave the musket to Virginia would've negated that excuse... colony records would show the purchase... ;)

A trade musket in VA or in North Carolina would be a good choice. Cheaper to shoot, generally lighter, cheaper to buy. Heck one pattern was so well used in North Carolina that it's called a Carolina Gun today.

LD
 
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