CVA Mountain Rifle

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Same Here. I've owned 3 over the last 10 years, .45,.50, and.54. All were worthy shooters. The .45 was the most accurate. Mistake to trade it off. Still keep a picture, to remind me not to be hasty in trading things off. Had a matching Mountain Pistol also...
I still have a .45 that I built from a kit in 1984, and have been looking for the matching pistol for years. Finally found one recently that needs a bit of work.
 

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Morena From New Zealand,
I have a bought used CVA..
It wouldn't hold on full cock & was really rusty .
Got to work on it & it's a amazing rifle. Comes to hand so nicely, & light .no trouble up & down hills & through the bush.
& very very accurate gun.
It's a,
.50
This one has modern sights & pretty sharp at the range.
Theres a lot better I know...but you could do a lot worse . This rifle is good for me.
Kind regards
Nga mihi
Chris
Ps Not myself in pictures. My friend scott. Hed never shot a muzzleloader before this day. Now he has 2 of his own.👍
 

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From another forum:

Guys,

Here's the straight story on the CVA Mountain Rifle. I was in charge of the development and initial production of the gun and Kit (built the first one ever to write the instructions). The guns were originally assembled in the U.S. from American cut maple stocks and Spanish parts. The very early barrels were conventional button rifled, but were changed to a unique extruded barrel was rifle and formed in a special high pressure die in Spain and shipped to the U.S. for final crowning and fitting of the breech. After a few years, the guns and kits were fully made in Spain.

The original prototype was made by the late Don Kammerer, a noted custom rifle maker from Indiana, also a great shot. It was he who shot the rifles at the national championship in Friendship Indiana. He challenged a writer who had been tough on CVA (with some justification) to a match - the writer's custom target gun of choice against the Mountian Rifle. Don shot his target with 5 different rifles and the writer used his custom gun. Don's target was better due to the writer's flyer which ruined the group. Don offered to let the guy fire a 6th shoot discounting the flyer. The guy's best 5 shots fractionally edged Don's group, but the point was made that those mountain rifles could really shoot. It was a big deal at the time. The range was closed for the match and a large crowd gathered. Great PR for CVA.

If you can find a good older version with the maple stock you might have a real good shooter. The gun wasn't a copy of any particular original, but Don built a very good compromise between authentic, yet easy to assemble, especially as a kit. I still have the first one ever built from a kit.

Reverend Chase
 
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From another forum:

Guys,

Here's the straight story on the CVA Mountain Rifle. I was in charge of the development and initial production of the gun and Kit (built the first one ever to write the instructions). The guns were originally assembled in the U.S. from American cut maple stocks and Spanish parts. The very early barrels were conventional button rifled, but were changed to a unique extruded barrel was rifle and formed in a special high pressure die in Spain and shipped to the U.S. for final crowning and fitting of the breech. After a few years, the guns and kits were fully made in Spain.

The original prototype was made by the late Don Kammerer, a noted custom rifle maker from Indiana, also a great shot. It was he who shot the rifles at the national championship in Friendship Indiana. He challenged a writer who had been tough on CVA (with some justification) to a match - the writer's custom target gun of choice against the Mountian Rifle. Don shot his target with 5 different rifles and the writer used his custom gun. Don's target was better due to the writer's flyer which ruined the group. Don offered to let the guy fire a 6th shoot discounting the flyer. The guy's best 5 shots fractionally edged Don's group, but the point was made that those mountain rifles could really shoot. It was a big deal at the time. The range was closed for the match and a large crowd gathered. Great PR for CVA.

If you can find a good older version with the maple stock you might have a real good shooter. The gun wasn't a copy of any particular original, but Don built a very good compromise between authentic, yet easy to assemble, especially as a kit. I still have the first one ever built from a kit.

Reverend Chase
What year was this event
 
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I’d have to say that the gun is not styled after any historical period firearm. It looks traditional without actually being a copy of a traditional gun. In my opinion, the gun is reminiscent of a mid-period plains rifle, early percussion half stock type.

My very 1st muzzleloader was a CVA .50 calibre Mountain Rifle. I saved my allowance for 6 or 7 months and bought it from a pawnshop, when I was 13 years old. I’ve used that gun to hunt everything from squirrels and rabbits, up through antelope, deer, and elk. I’ve fired thousands of rounds, and burned 100’s of pounds of powder out the muzzle of that gun. In the 12 years that the gun was my primary/only muzzleloader, it never failed me, either on the range…or when Makin Meat.

CVA did not produce the best made kit guns, I would say that honor went to Thompson Center; and today, it would go to Kibler; but once the kit is completed properly, you will have a very reliably shooting firearm. I have yet to handle and shoot one of those old CVA Mountain Rifles, Big Bore Mountain Rifles included, that was not spot on accurate.

The breech design on some guns can give you fits, CVA failed miserably with this design. I sold a beautiful Big Bore due to the countless misfires while hunting, it was one of the most accurate rifles I ever owned, it just refused to shoot on multiple occasions when I needed it to go boom. That being said, a competent gunsmith, familiar with CVAs and their quirks can easily fix most issues, this one included…

I’ve gotten a lot of my gun projects completed this summer. I’ve two left to complete. I’m now to the point where I’m ready to go back to my old 1st muzzleloader and give it another facelift, I’m thinking of making it into a 15/16ths, .54 calibre rifle, from its original .50 calibre. 20 years ago I bought a CVA Mountain Rifle kit…it’s one of the early low serial number kits, with a mildly curly maple stock. I’ll be finishing that project this fall and winter.

I guess what I’m implying, is that these old CVA kit guns get into your blood, and it’s hard to let them go. They have their issues, but they are still an amazing quality product. If you find one that was loved and cared for, it will serve you well.
 
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From another forum:

Guys,

Here's the straight story on the CVA Mountain Rifle. I was in charge of the development and initial production of the gun and Kit (built the first one ever to write the instructions). The guns were originally assembled in the U.S. from American cut maple stocks and Spanish parts. The very early barrels were conventional button rifled, but were changed to a unique extruded barrel was rifle and formed in a special high pressure die in Spain and shipped to the U.S. for final crowning and fitting of the breech. After a few years, the guns and kits were fully made in Spain.

The original prototype was made by the late Don Kammerer, a noted custom rifle maker from Indiana, also a great shot. It was he who shot the rifles at the national championship in Friendship Indiana. He challenged a writer who had been tough on CVA (with some justification) to a match - the writer's custom target gun of choice against the Mountian Rifle. Don shot his target with 5 different rifles and the writer used his custom gun. Don's target was better due to the writer's flyer which ruined the group. Don offered to let the guy fire a 6th shoot discounting the flyer. The guy's best 5 shots fractionally edged Don's group, but the point was made that those mountain rifles could really shoot. It was a big deal at the time. The range was closed for the match and a large crowd gathered. Great PR for CVA.

If you can find a good older version with the maple stock you might have a real good shooter. The gun wasn't a copy of any particular original, but Don built a very good compromise between authentic, yet easy to assemble, especially as a kit. I still have the first one ever built from a kit.

Reverend Chase
Thank you! Great info.
 
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From another forum:

Guys,

Here's the straight story on the CVA Mountain Rifle. I was in charge of the development and initial production of the gun and Kit (built the first one ever to write the instructions). The guns were originally assembled in the U.S. from American cut maple stocks and Spanish parts. The very early barrels were conventional button rifled, but were changed to a unique extruded barrel was rifle and formed in a special high pressure die in Spain and shipped to the U.S. for final crowning and fitting of the breech. After a few years, the guns and kits were fully made in Spain.

The original prototype was made by the late Don Kammerer, a noted custom rifle maker from Indiana, also a great shot. It was he who shot the rifles at the national championship in Friendship Indiana. He challenged a writer who had been tough on CVA (with some justification) to a match - the writer's custom target gun of choice against the Mountian Rifle. Don shot his target with 5 different rifles and the writer used his custom gun. Don's target was better due to the writer's flyer which ruined the group. Don offered to let the guy fire a 6th shoot discounting the flyer. The guy's best 5 shots fractionally edged Don's group, but the point was made that those mountain rifles could really shoot. It was a big deal at the time. The range was closed for the match and a large crowd gathered. Great PR for CVA.

If you can find a good older version with the maple stock you might have a real good shooter. The gun wasn't a copy of any particular original, but Don built a very good compromise between authentic, yet easy to assemble, especially as a kit. I still have the first one ever built from a kit.

Reverend Chase
Great information. Thanks! I just bought a 50 cal CVA Mountain Rifle that has the blonde maple stock and made in USA on the barrel. All browned parts and has the six sided ramrod thimbles. Minty rifle that doesn't look like it was even shot. Have a .54 mountain rifle with maple stock that doesn't say made in USA on the barrel but doesn't say made in Spain either. Has all the other CVA information on the barrel. Any idea on that one? Was it a transition rifle between the made in USA and made in Spain rifles? Curious on the history and years of these rifles.
 
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Built my CVA .45 Mountain rifle kit in 81. It was my only rifle for 40 years.

So did I. I bought my .54 BB Mtn. Rifle kit at Ander's Cache on Chena Dome Rd outside of Fairbanks, AK. $200.00 or so. I built it in my tent with a pocketknife! I had to rebarrel a few years ago (my neglect). Hunting that silly rifle this fall.

Pete Davis
 

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So did I. I bought my .54 BB Mtn. Rifle kit at Ander's Cache on Chena Dome Rd outside of Fairbanks, AK. $200.00 or so. I built it in my tent with a pocketknife! I had to rebarrel a few years ago (my neglect). Hunting that silly rifle this fall.

Pete Davis
What did you use to get that beautiful stock color?
 

MO_E_W

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After seeing all these CVA MR I guess I should to show mine.
1978 Model. The lock and triggers have been polished and honed. The stain is Tanic acid for this first coat, then Aquafortis for the second coat. Then 4/0 steel wool to bring out the curl. The final coats were boiled linseed oil. Left the iron hardware gray.
MO
 

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Gtrubicon

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After seeing all these CVA MR I guess I should to show mine.
1978 Model. The lock and triggers have been polished and honed. The stain is Tanic acid for this first coat, then Aquafortis for the second coat. Then 4/0 steel wool to bring out the curl. The final coats were boiled linseed oil. Left the iron hardware gray.
MO
Beautiful rifle.
 
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Awesome … just picked one up at a ‘modern’ gunshop for only $100! I can’t even tell if it may have been fired - SCORE!

Has the 4 screw patchbox, hex ramrod pipes & is marked USA … features I’m told that place it as an early 70s model, without a ding or mark on it anywhere and a mint bore, woo hoo!
 
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