Cowboys and Indians in the 1800's

Discussion in 'The Plains' started by Ron LaClair, Feb 16, 2018.

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  1. Mar 27, 2019 #61

    Einsiedler

    Einsiedler

    Einsiedler

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    Like to add a moment I had last October. Returning from a successful Colorado 2nd rifle elk season. Fits in with the above publication.

    On IH-25 there along the Canadian river bottom. South of Raton NM and north of the Wagon Mound. Old son and I came upon a pretty good size herd of elk crossing the interstate. About 200-250 animals. Mostly cows. A few raghorns and spikes. One really nice old bull.

    After they got back on plains on west side of hwy, I says to son, "Look! Now that’s the way it was here back then!!! And that’s a small herd!!!!" It was a cool sight! Heck, I’ve seen em before between Las Vegas and Raton. Elk on the plains! Just this herd looked special. Was just one of those moments.
     
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  2. Apr 20, 2019 #62

    Artie Peltier

    Artie Peltier

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    Thanks! It was a great read although I was squirming around in the chair when I reached the operation part. Talk about tough. Can’t imagine someone cutting into me with no anesthesia! Next time I go to the dentist I’ll be thinking of this story and and try not to whine to much! Thanks again Art
     
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  3. Apr 22, 2019 #63

    BlackHillsBob

    BlackHillsBob

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    saw a big dead black bear sitting on it butt with his head on his chest as if he was sleeping along side the high way south of raton right next to the river you mentioned. my wife and i thought it was a dead person at first. it was hit by a truck and landed in that weird posititon. it made every one stop to look. never will see that again.
     
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  4. Apr 24, 2019 #64

    1clayguy

    1clayguy

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    Yep, did that! I guess I'm now at the point where I decide what BP gun I want and find a historic book that relates to it to justify the purchase. Works every time!
     
  5. May 7, 2019 #65

    reeladventuresstjohn

    reeladventuresstjohn

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  6. May 7, 2019 #66

    BlackHillsBob

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    stone points were given up quite early, traders came with iron points. also when natives got frying pans they would break them up to make arrow heads out of them. they are out their. walk the fresh plowed soil turned fields with your eyes on the ground. may come up with one. my sons father inlaw found a human pelvis with a stone spear point stuck deep in it. the ground is full of stuff.
     
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  7. May 8, 2019 #67

    wshipman

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    Steel points came with the fur trappers, as trade items. Indians, of course, liked them. The original ones would be tied on a length of cord through a hole in their middle. The number of points removed fro the cord and given to the indian depended on the type and quality of the pelt(s). These were basically made from an octagon or hexagon, with punched holes as can be seen. They were cut across the 'pie' so as to cut thru holes (1/2 holes on edges) The center hole allowed for stringing, while the 1/2 holes on the edges facilitated tying to the arrow.

    [​IMG]
    Actually, there were two forms of trade points, the second one came along later, i believe and a tutorial on how to make your own can be found in Instructables at or they can be purchased from https://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/PartDetail.aspx/1053/1/ARROW-PT-F.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2019
  8. May 8, 2019 #68

    BlackHillsBob

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  9. May 8, 2019 #69

    hanshi

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    Speaking of removing arrowheads from a living human, Alexander The Great once took an arrow in his torso and then survived its removal. It is unknown whether it bothered him in the years afterward.
     
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  10. May 8, 2019 #70

    satx78247

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    BlackHillsBob,

    Fyi, ONE of the most common "secondary" sources for metal projectile points was wagon wheel RIMS & barrel HOOPS, when the wood broke/rotted away.

    yours, satx
     
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  11. May 9, 2019 #71

    BlackHillsBob

    BlackHillsBob

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    thanks for that, you are correct.
     
  12. May 9, 2019 #72

    troy2000

    troy2000

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  13. May 9, 2019 #73

    troy2000

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    Reminds me of my grandfather. Back in the fifties when Moby Dick was a minnow and I was a young sprout, he told me, "son, you're mostly Scottish and Irish, with a bit of German on your grandmother's side. You also have some Cherokee and Chickasaw, and maybe a little Choctaw. But thank God, there isn't a drop of English blood in you!"

    And I'm betting no one in the family had even seen an Englishman in over 150 years... old conflicts have a long half life.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
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  14. May 12, 2019 #74

    nagantino

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    Incredible illustrations. And how strange and wonderful to think that 175 years ago, nothing in terms of time, these fierce, and primitive peoples were still to be found living and fighting in Texas and Comancharia.
     
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  15. May 14, 2019 #75

    satx78247

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    nagantino,

    Fwiw, LTG George Patton, Jr. once said that, "No better irregular light cavalry ever existed than the Indian warriors of the Plains".

    yours, satx
     
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  16. May 14, 2019 #76

    nagantino

    nagantino

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    In the Empire of the Summer Moon, the author relates a raid by a large Comanche band deep into the settled part of Texas, San Antonio I think. After ransacking the town the Comanche made off trailing loot and horses. A group of settlers and some soldiers, who had begun calling themselves Rangers, caught up with the band and attacked. The battles carried on for some miles, but during it the Comanche found time to tie two captive women to trees and fired arrows at them. One woman was the grand daughter of Daniel Boone who died from the arrows. The other survived because the arrows deflected off her whale bone corsets.
     

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