Cowboys and Indians in the 1800's

Discussion in 'The Plains' started by Ron LaClair, Feb 16, 2018.

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  1. Aug 5, 2018 #21

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Simon,

    Thanks for answering Smoothshooter for me.
    Computer was sick and just got it back a few days ago!

    Are you from over there too? (UK?)
     
  2. Aug 10, 2018 #22

    BillinOregon

    BillinOregon

    BillinOregon

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    Snakebite, thanks for recommending "Indian Depredations in Texas." Looking at the Amazon offerings, it appears some reprint editions are better than others.
    When a young lad, I got to visit with my great-grandmother, born in 1858, and whose family moved back to Texas in 1866. She grew up around San Saba and then Buffalo Gap. My grandmother told me I could ask great-grandma about "horse and buggy days," but I was never to ask her about Comanches.
    I treasure this tenuous link to the past.
     
  3. Dec 29, 2018 #23

    rickjf

    rickjf

    rickjf

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    I was raised in Lubbock and lived most of my life in that area. I live in Garland now.
    It was Comanche country. The natives learned iron work from the Spanish in the 16 and 1700s.
    I pastored a Baptist church at Tuscola 1976-1983 8 miles from Buffalo Gap. There were a couple of brothers in their 90s. I asked one (a barber there for decades) if the Indians were gone when their family settled there. He said that they were still there.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2018
  4. Dec 29, 2018 #24

    satx78247

    satx78247

    satx78247

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    tenngun,

    My Great-Uncle Jack, former US Marine of WWI, carried a 8mm German machine-gun bullet near his spine for over 60 years.
    Didn't seem to bother him much.

    yours, satx
     
  5. Dec 31, 2018 #25

    satx78247

    satx78247

    satx78247

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    cositrike,

    THANKS. - You "beat me to the punch", as I was about to answer the query.

    Fyi, my family were once BORDER REIVERS in "the disputed lands" along the Scots/English border, until they were BANISHED forever to "His Majesty's colonies in the Carolinas", for "running off stock" & ended up in "the family business" in South Carolina.
    (I was a young teenager when I realized that the wild stories of warring/blood feuds/lovely maids, who were "carried off"/brave warriors, who fought for The Clan & other tales of derring do, that I heard as a spellbound boy-child, were stories, which were imported from The British Isles & passed down in the family from the 16th & 17th Centuries.)

    The family finally got "more or less law-abiding" after the AWI, when they moved to northern AL/GA/MS & became what was known as "Ass Nomads" or "Free Grazers", who drove their flocks/herds into the mountains of TN to graze in the Summer & to the Gulf Coast to "Winter over" each Fall.
    (The story of the border ruffians "in the disputed lands" is well-described in THE STEEL BONNETS by George McDonald Fraser.)

    During "The Late Unpleasantness" of 1861-65, our family were mostly Confederate Partisan Rangers & (once more called) Border Ruffians.
    After Richmond fell, the family moved on to Northeast Texas with their flocks & herds, where our extended family remains in 2018.

    Note: My late mother was "our family's historian" & was quite excited to find out that our Lowland Scots & Northumbrian ancestors "across the pond" were described as "Border Lords", until she found out that "Border Lords" was synonymous (at least to the mind of the nobility & "the better sort" of British people) with "cattle rustlers", "bloodthirsty raiders", "cutthroats", "thieves" and/or "outlaws".

    yours, satx
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
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  6. Dec 31, 2018 #26

    Artificer

    Artificer

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    Gee, those are far more gentle descriptions than some I've found from England and Virginia in the 18th century. :D

    During the AWI when Patriots were basically forced to move the Capital from Williamsburg to Richmond,VA - far enough upriver that sea going British ships could not bombard the town/city; there were plenty of Patriot British Americans who didn't want to do it, as they called Richmond "A Den of Filthy Scots." I found that a few times when looking for other things.

    I have both Highland and Lowland Scots in my ancestry as well as Scots-Irish, Welsh and some others. Considering how Highland Clans often did some/many of those things as "normal recreational sport" to other Highland Clans, I can't get too upset about it. ;)

    My Paternal Grandmother's maiden name was James and she was one of the first family historians. For some reason, Grandma was convinced that "King James" had James as his last name, instead of his first name. So she looked in vain to see if we might be related. Then she did find a Noble Ancestor, which got her pretty excited at first. That was until she found out he was considered a "Villainous Rake" and that put an end to her doing any more family research.

    Gus
     
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  7. Dec 31, 2018 #27

    30coupe

    30coupe

    30coupe

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    I do! It's where my right knee used to be. The doc put it there in 2002. It works great, but it will light up the metal detectors at the airport.
     
  8. Dec 31, 2018 #28

    satx78247

    satx78247

    satx78247

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    Gus,

    When I took up genealogy (when Mother became quite ill & finally became an invalid), I found a single person who, was my direct ancestor, & who became "the first modern celebrity": Pocahontas the youngest daughter of Deep Stream & Little Fawn.
    (I'd sooner have her for my 13th grandmother than any half-dozen kings & queens of Europe. - I'm directly descended from her through her youngest child, Cleopatra Smith-Rolfe)

    I recently read an article that indicates that the Queen of the UK had a "girl crush" upon Pocahontas & named her, "first among my ladies in waiting", had her remarried in a "fancy" Church of England "royal-style" wedding & "conferred many favors upon her".
    (More than one historian has compared her celebrity to that of the current Duchess of Sussex, in that the British press was fascinated in "the exotic Indian Princess from our colonies" & wrote about her public appearances, nice manners, calm demeanor, physical beauty & fashionable dress, constantly.)

    Sadly, Pocahontas didn't live very long after that, as she passed away, from what was likely typhoid fever in March of 1617, when she was not quite 21YO.

    yours, satx
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
  9. Dec 31, 2018 #29

    satx78247

    satx78247

    satx78247

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    Gus; All,

    For those who are interested in the "imported culture" from Scotland, Ireland & Northern England in the southern USA, consider finding/reading, CRACKER CULTURE: CELTIC WAYS in the OLD SOUTH by Grady McWhiney, PhD.
    (I was privileged to know Professor McWhiney from 1991 until his death in 2006. He was kind enough to share his notes on members of our family, which he had found in his research & told me much about our ancestors' culture, mores, lives & exploits in Northern England & in the Scottish lowlands from the 1500's to the time that they were banished to the Carolinas. He also "filled in a lot of blanks" in my knowledge about GEN James Bankhead & his son, COL Smith Pyne Bankhead, late of the CSA's State Artillery, who were members of the family)

    yours, satx
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
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  10. Jan 2, 2019 #30

    cositrike

    cositrike

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    Sorry Pukka, I never saw this. As we’ve been in contact on another site, you’ll already know that I’m in England. I live in East Sussex, on the South coast. If I drive about 20 miles south, I get wet in the good old English Channel. Regards
    Simon
     
  11. Jan 2, 2019 #31

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Thanks Simon, sometimes these display names get me all addled.
    Have family down your way. (N'r Battle) Have a cherry orchard. Nice country!
     
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  12. Jan 2, 2019 #32

    Baxter

    Baxter

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    Your first paragraph is fascinating.

    On Presque Isle, Marquette, MI, there is a grave marker for a Native American man, an Ojibwe I believe, who was born in 1799 and died in 1903. Every time that I was on Presque Isle, I visited his grave. Something about his lifespan in "those times" and the fact that he saw three centuries holds me in awe still.

    Apologize for going OT.
    Baxter
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2019
  13. Jan 2, 2019 #33

    cositrike

    cositrike

    cositrike

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    Was down in Battle a few weeks back. About 30 mins from me.
    A nice little town. Best regards for 2019
     
  14. Jan 3, 2019 #34

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

    Pukka Bundook

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    Thanks and the same to you Simon.
    Pleased you are getting your other rifle sussed out! (BMF)
     
  15. Jan 3, 2019 #35

    8 BORE

    8 BORE

    8 BORE

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    A year old and all wrong
     

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