Confederate use of brass frame remingtons

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Treestalker

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I see a lot of these brass framed Remington copies. Is there any historical evidence of their manufacture of use by the Confederacy? I'm not talking about Spiller and Burr's. Thanks.
 
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No.

They are a modern fantasy item. Cheaper to produce for the Italians. There were SIMILAR brass framed closed top guns like the mentioned Spiller and Burrs and a few others, but no Remington clones were ever made in brass by the Confederacy, or anyone else, until the 1960s at the earliest.
 

sourdough

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Author Steve Sheldon is somewhat correct with his observations:

"During the Civil war, the firm of Schneider and Glassick of Memphis, TN, produced perhaps some 50 copies of the Colt 1851 Navy, though some of the extant copies have brass frames but iron trigger guards and backstraps. And the cylinders were smooth-sided with no naval battle scene engraving and no step-down in diameter towards the rear. There are no reproductions of this revolver available. There are, or were, a few reasonable reproductions of historical brass-framed revolvers made. There have been runs of the Confederate Griswold & Gunnison made by various manufacturers, and likewise Pietta as of today makes a copy of the Spiller and Burr.

So if you want a historically-accurate brass-framed revolver, about your only commercially-available reproduction option today is the Pietta Spiller and Burr. Lodgewood Manufacturing offers a copy of the Griswold & Gunnison from time to time."

The bolded section above is not correct. Pietta markets two brass frame 1851 Navy "type" revolvers: the Griswold & Gunnison .36 (with part round/part octagon barrel and smooth non-engraved cylinder) and an 1851 Navy .36 (with octagon barrel and engraved cylinder). Pietta bought out EMF awhile back, and now EMF is the primary distributor of Pietta products in the US. Since ~2001 Pietta has used CNC machining for all of its revolvers, and the parts interchange very well. If you wish to procure a plain non-engraved cylinder to create a Schneider & Glassick, VTI and Taylor's sell them and you can find "used" ones on Ebay.

I have many Pietta 1851 Navy "type" .36 revolvers and I can attest to that. I like Confederate revolvers and have created several, four of which are below.

Schneider & Glassick and Leech & Rigdon



Griswold & Gunnison and Ridgon & Ansley (12-stop-slot cylinder by me)



Sheldon also refers to Lodgewood as a source for a G&G. Lodgewood specializes in defarbing/antiquing Italian replica revolvers to look like 150+-year-old guns and charges a fairly hefty price to do so.

http://www.lodgewood.com/Confederate-Griswold-Gunnison-Revolver_c_305.html

Regards,

Jim
 

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Author Steve Sheldon is somewhat correct with his observations:

"During the Civil war, the firm of Schneider and Glassick of Memphis, TN, produced perhaps some 50 copies of the Colt 1851 Navy, though some of the extant copies have brass frames but iron trigger guards and backstraps. And the cylinders were smooth-sided with no naval battle scene engraving and no step-down in diameter towards the rear. There are no reproductions of this revolver available. There are, or were, a few reasonable reproductions of historical brass-framed revolvers made. There have been runs of the Confederate Griswold & Gunnison made by various manufacturers, and likewise Pietta as of today makes a copy of the Spiller and Burr.

So if you want a historically-accurate brass-framed revolver, about your only commercially-available reproduction option today is the Pietta Spiller and Burr. Lodgewood Manufacturing offers a copy of the Griswold & Gunnison from time to time."

The bolded section above is not correct. Pietta markets two brass frame 1851 Navy "type" revolvers: the Griswold & Gunnison .36 (with part round/part octagon barrel and smooth non-engraved cylinder) and an 1851 Navy .36 (with octagon barrel and engraved cylinder). Pietta bought out EMF awhile back, and now EMF is the primary distributor of Pietta products in the US. Since ~2001 Pietta has used CNC machining for all of its revolvers, and the parts interchange very well. If you wish to procure a plain non-engraved cylinder to create a Schneider & Glassick, VTI and Taylor's sell them and you can find "used" ones on Ebay.

I have many Pietta 1851 Navy "type" .36 revolvers and I can attest to that. I like Confederate revolvers and have created several, four of which are below.

Schneider & Glassick and Leech & Rigdon



Griswold & Gunnison and Ridgon & Ansley (12-stop-slot cylinder by me)



Sheldon also refers to Lodgewood as a source for a G&G. Lodgewood specializes in defarbing/antiquing Italian replica revolvers to look like 150+-year-old guns and charges a fairly hefty price to do so.

http://www.lodgewood.com/Confederate-Griswold-Gunnison-Revolver_c_305.html

Regards,

Jim
EMF does have the non-historically correct brass frame Navy, a Griswold/Gunnison, an incorrect brass frame 1858 Remington, and the brass frame Spiller and Burr. If I'm not mistaken, the OP wanted to know if there were actually any brass frame Remingtons in use by the confederacy. The Spiller and Burr defarb from Lodgewood at $155 does not seem too hefty to me. Here's their work:
http://www.lodgewood.com/Confederate-Spiller-and-Burr-Revolver_c_304.html
 

nkbj

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The brass framed Remington could be fun to experiment on for colored patinas (but how would the steel barrel be affected?). Once saw an older Remington with a deep reddish patina on the trigger guard that was very nice.
 

Treestalker

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EMF does have the non-historically correct brass frame Navy, a Griswold/Gunnison, an incorrect brass frame 1858 Remington, and the brass frame Spiller and Burr. If I'm not mistaken, the OP wanted to know if there were actually any brass frame Remingtons in use by the confederacy. The Spiller and Burr defarb from Lodgewood at $155 does not seem too hefty to me. Here's their work:
http://www.lodgewood.com/Confederate-Spiller-and-Burr-Revolver_c_304.html
Wow! What a job by Lodgewood! It looks like it fell off the back of a mule drawn Confederate wagon. I once owned a Spiller and Burr repro years ago, shot it some and let a friend talk me out of it. Maybe it's time to find another one, used of course! My brother Tiny once owned a Whitney .36 steel frame, in the '70s IIRC, and sold it before I could talk him out of it. Haven't even seen one since.
 

Treestalker

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The brass framed Remington could be fun to experiment on for colored patinas (but how would the steel barrel be affected?). Once saw an older Remington with a deep reddish patina on the trigger guard that was very nice.
Treated with mild acid, (urine, vinegar) the brass would likely take on a beautiful patina, but you would have to protect the steel with a resist like grease, unless you wanted it to age too. Interesting idea!
 

nkbj

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There's a very old Scientific American Book of Formulas on the shelves to consult.
Maybe could be a fun winter time project.
 

Stantheman86

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Unless you must have the closest thing to a real Spiller & Burr I'd say just get the Pietta and shoot it a lot, and a few hundred trips in and out of a holster should "age it up".

I think a steel frame swapped onto a Pietta "Schneider and Glassick" and all the blue taken off in a vinegar bath , then allowed to "patina " along with the brass would be a neat, cost effective piece.

I had wanted an "Old Silver" 51 Navy and thought it would look good with a brass grip frame......
 

sourdough

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I think a steel frame swapped onto a Pietta "Schneider and Glassick" and all the blue taken off in a vinegar bath , then allowed to "patina " along with the brass would be a neat, cost effective piece.
Pietta has not made an accidental S&G since ~2000 CNC machining. A Pietta 1851 Navy .36 steel octagon barrel with engraved cylinder is readily available, and all that is needed is a plain non-engraved cylinder to create an Augusta Machine Works revolver. AMW revolvers had both 6-stop-slot and 12-stop-slot cylinders, and the shoulders on the backstrap were more pronounced than the Colt.

My rendition with a 12-stop-slot cylinder:



You can defarb/antique it as you wish. I don't do that for very many reasons.

Regards,

Jim
 

Stantheman86

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Dixie has some old stock smooth cylinder .36 Schneider & Glassick type Piettas for sale. They've been listed for years I guess they're not hot sellers.

I would just like another Spiller & Burr, I bought a kit gun a long time ago and I use it as a display gun since I was dumb, fired 6 rounds through it for July 4th and forgot to clean it. It looks "old" and can probably be brought back but I'd like a finished one.

About 10 years ago I had one of the Pietta Griswolds , with the round barrel. Haven't seen them offered since.
 

Stantheman86

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Some of these places keep Out of Stock stuff listed for 10 years :) I found an online Sutler place that had "Temporarily Out of Stock" Miroku 1863 Springfield rifles....like ok, Temporarily , completely out of production.

I wish Uberti would make a little 5 shot .36 non-stepped cylinder Manhattan Arms repro. It would be real easy.
 
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