Civil War??

Discussion in 'Civil War' started by Sun City, Sep 5, 2018.

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  1. Jul 10, 2019 #901

    ppg1949

    ppg1949

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    Thanks springfield art for your interest. The rub in this story is the treasure was buried and six wagons burned. When TWBTS was over, the cavalry officers returned and sent by train to Michigan. As Eutycus said in a post, the treasury included Mexican pecos that were silver or gold coins. It’s fun to watch, sort like a murder mystery movie but as I posted before all records from Jeff’n Davis and his cabinet indicate less that $30K was with the President when captured.
     
  2. Jul 10, 2019 #902

    Zonie

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    Because of the inflation rate in the US between 1865 and 2019 $1.00 then is worth $16.10 dollars today.
    If the $30000 value was right and the number was stated in 1866 the amount today would be $483,000.00

    If gold was still at $32/Troy ounce like it was before they removed the Federal control of it, it would take 15,093.75** Troy ounces to equal that value.
    That would be 1257.8 pounds of gold. (There are 12 Troy ounces in a pound.)

    Of course if there was silver in the mix the weight could be considerably higher.

    All of this is only theory of course. If the stash actually existed and it was found today it would be worth millions just because of its collector value.

    **If the $483,000 value was figured at todays price of about $1300/Troy ounce the weight of the shipment in gold would be about 371.538 Troy ounces or, 30.963 pounds worth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
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  3. Jul 10, 2019 #903

    springfield art

    springfield art

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    Give it a rest, everyone! There's tons of books about the subject; this is a Muzzleloading site, not a re-hash of the Civil War.
     
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  4. Jul 10, 2019 #904

    springfield art

    springfield art

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    You know, now you've got me interested in the fate of the "Treasury" if it indeed did get transported anywhere. There was a rumor that the treasury secy., Judah Benjamin, took it to Europe! Please, the whole thing must've weighed tons. I hope we stick to muzzleloading, and leave the Civil War history to the proper sites. Now I'm going to research it's fate in the library or legitimate sites. Have a good Summer!
     
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  5. Jul 11, 2019 #905

    Zonie

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    Your right. It is a muzzleloading site but more importantly in this case, your in the Reenacting section of it.
    In the Reenacting area, discussing the equipment, dress and the events that have happened in history is the name of the game.
     
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  6. Jul 11, 2019 #906

    tenngun

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    31000 lbs of gold would only take up about 25 cubic feet. While it would take a lot of wagons to move it could be buried in a small hole.
    Just playing devils advocate here ,as I don’t think the history channels show is anything more then entertainment, a big value of money could be hidden while turning in a big value of money as a cover.
    Hidden gold and treasures spirited away in war is too good of a story not to have happened.... at least it did in an Alexander Kent novel, and to Allen Lewrie in his novels, Kelly’s hero’s Three kings.....
     
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  7. Jul 11, 2019 #907

    Eutycus

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    Here recently I've gotten the opportunity to look through different rosters of several CSA regiments. It amazes me how many "Foreign" names come up. I always assumed there would be hardly nothing but Anglo names involved. Not so! There weren't many nationalities that were not represented. There was even thousands of Mexicans surnames involved. So much for this being a White mans fight !
     
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  8. Jul 11, 2019 #908

    GunnyGene

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    Which says far more about the trade value (purchasing power) of a dollar than it does about the trade value of gold. ;):rolleyes:
     
  9. Jul 11, 2019 #909

    armoredshoe

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    The Spencer is a rimfire and they could not reload spent cases. They were issued ammunition which was carried in Blakeslee tubes for fast reloading. I'm attaching a couple of photos for reference.[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  10. Jul 11, 2019 #910

    Artificer

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    BRAVO!! That is an exemplary question! (Yes, I'm biased, both as a period Artificer/Armorer and as a past Shop Chief of a modern 5th Echelon/Depot Shop. :D )

    The Virginia Manufactory of Arms had ceased production of arms around 1821-22, but was used by the Commonwealth as a Arms storage point until it became too dilapidated a couple of decades later. In 1861 it was revived as The Richmond Armory/Arsenal - a storage place for Arms and other things, thereafter, but also began repairing/overhauling older arms.

    Captured Arms that could not be rather easily repaired in the Field were sent to Richmond Armory for repair/overhaul/cannibalization of serviceable parts.

    Also, you asked: "Isn't the Spencer round a rimfire?"

    Yes it was. There was some work done by the Confederate Laboratory on Brown's Island on the James River near Richmond to make cartridges for the Spencer for the CS Cavalry, though I'm not sure how many rounds were actually manufactured there.
     
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  11. Jul 11, 2019 #911

    tenngun

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    Louisiana Arkansas South Carolina an Missouri had large pockets of French, and Hispanic. Louisiana had a big population of black slave owners. A lot of Hispanics lived in Texas and many migrated in to Missouri along theSanta Fe trail even before the Mexican war. The sea coast got sailors from everywhere. Eastern and Southern Europeans were recruited as they stepped off the ships and Irish too. Native Americans fought in both armies. Many of the aristocratic families traced ancestors back to famous Indians in local history.
     
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  12. Jul 11, 2019 #912

    Eutycus

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    A British observer noted that the infantry unit on parade drill had as many sombreros as hats and kepis. I think he called it the "most diversified regiment in Texas". He also saw alot of blue uniforms as well. The regiment he observed was the 3rd Infantry. My great great grandfathers unit. I had the opportunity to read the muster roll and it is amazing how many Germanic or Hispanic names are on that roster. Grandpa was Polish by the way.
     
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  13. Jul 11, 2019 #913

    ppg1949

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    Eutycus, as you mentioned in an earlier post, the names of immigrants were often "Americanized". My Irish descendants were D'Alton's which became Dalton on arrival.
     
  14. Jul 12, 2019 #914

    satx78247

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    To All,

    SOME CSA regiments had almost NO Americans, who were CSA citizens. =TENTH LOUISIANA INFANTRY for just one such regiment.
    (The 10th was called LEE's FOREIGN LEGION, as many members didn't even speak English well.)

    Personal Notes:
    1. I'm a US member (SGT, Service of Supply) of todays 10th LA. - In the 21st Century, MOST of our non-US member are Canadians.
    2. As my father was "lightly injured" playing NFL football in 1938, the USAAC didn't accept him for pilot training, so he was accepted as a "foreign pilot trainee" in the RCAF.
    (The Royal Canadian Air Force Pursuit School was in Terrell, TX in WWII. - Today, the TXARNG Armory is in the old RCAF HQ building.)
    TWO DAYS after he was accepted by the RCAF, the USAAC decided to accept him for US service. - He ended up "in" B-17s & B29s.

    IF you are interested in US soldiers who served in other military forces AND/OR foreign soldiers in the US Armed Forces, check out the book: CROSSBORDER WARRIORS by Fred Gaffin.

    yours, satx
     
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  15. Jul 12, 2019 #915

    Eutycus

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    I need some help on this one, I'm reading a book on Blockade Running in Texas during the Civil War.At the very beginning of the war spectators climbed the highest roofs in Galveston to watch for Ships in the Gulf. Kind of like a neighborhood watch thing I suppose. Anyway these volunteers were called JOLOs. The meaning of JOLO is lost to history as to just what it means.The author of the book did a of of research and still " came up blank". The LO in JOLO is thought to mean Look Out. The rest is anyones guess. Any historians out there?
     
  16. Jul 12, 2019 #916

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

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    I can but only venture a guess, I would presume that JOLO is a contaction for "Joe's lookouts" named after Captain Joe Hendley.
    The JOLO operated from a watchtower on the roof of the Hendley building.


    History is more fun than television. :D
     
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  17. Jul 12, 2019 #917

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

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    By golly, I think you just may have hit it right on the head there. According to the book it was the Hendley building. Did you read the book?
     
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  18. Jul 12, 2019 #918

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

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    No, but it sound interesting.
     
  19. Jul 12, 2019 #919

    Eutycus

    Eutycus

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    I'm sort of puzzled how the author of the book couldn't find that out.I think he even worked with the Texas Historical Commission while researching this book.Plus I think he's native of the Galveston area.
     
  20. Jul 12, 2019 #920

    Carbon 6

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    None of that surprises me at all. I'm sure the story was only an anecdotal to him and not his primary focus.
     
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