Choosing the best rear sight height adjustment before start to filing the front sight.

Help Support Muzzle Loading Forum:

marco

32 Cal.
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
28
Reaction score
5
One of my rifles is Shooting too low even with the rear sight at maximum height.

I have been reading topics regarding filing the front sight and I think it's the solution to my problem.

I'm planing to tape mask the rifle bore, do some filing, shoot, file again, shoot again, etc., till everything is ok.

But, before to start filing the front sight, where should I put my rear sight? At the lowest, medium or higher position?

I mean.. I think the rear sight should have some "give" to go up and down after I file the front sight, so I can use the rear sight for small adjustments..

But if I start to file the front sight with the rear sight at its highest (or lowest) position, I am afraid I will could not move it even higher (or lower) if needed.

So, that's my question, where should I put my rear sight before start to file the front sight.

A medium height position is a good option?

Or not?

thanks u all.
Cheers
 
Joined
Mar 13, 2020
Messages
3,064
Reaction score
6,095
Location
On the Border
1. what range are you shooting?
2. what is your charge/patch/ball size.
i have a rifle that responds dramatically to powder charge change.
all that said personally i would set the rear mid range. medium height.
someone smarter will be along.
 

Urban Coyote

32 Cal.
Joined
Oct 13, 2013
Messages
102
Reaction score
127
Reading your post I'm going to assume your rear sight is adjustable. You don't make mention of what make and model gun you're working with. If a commercial rifle of current or recent manufacture you may want to check if a lower front sight is available to replace the current, especially if you have a bead front sight and not a blade. If not filing is your option.

As for what height to set an adjustable rear sight before filing it's your discretion but I'd suggest you start high then file the front down until you get the gun shooting at the desired elevation. Then, if you have enough front sight left, work to balance the front and rear sights until you have a bit of adjustment in the rear sight to play with.

When working with fixed sight guns I try to establish the best grouping load before I take a file to my sights.
 

Phil Coffins

54 Cal.
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
1,903
Reaction score
3,656
Location
Colorado
Setting your sights isn’t a guessing game there’s a very predictable way to do it.
Having found the load you want to use for best performance, set your rear sight at the mid point and shoot a group. It doesn’t matter where it groups but a tight group at the range you believe is useful. Then measure the center of the group to the aiming point. For example you’re 10” high and 2” left. Now measure the rifle for the distance between front and rear sight. The math is simple and has been posted here often. Do the filing and drift the sights using a dial calipers to measure the movement. The next shot with be on or very close to perfect.
Sight radius (distance between sights in inches) X distance to move impact on target in inches / divided by distance to target in inches = equals amount to move sight

distance to target
25 yards = 900 inches
50 yards = 1800 inches
100 yards = 3600 inches

example
20" sight to sight
X 1" distance to move impact / 900 for 25 yards
20 X 1 / 900 = .0222222
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 21, 2008
Messages
7,039
Reaction score
1,457
When making sights I find "by the book" heights to be just a good estimate so I always start in the middle with an adjustable rear, and high with the front.
 

marco

32 Cal.
Joined
Dec 17, 2016
Messages
28
Reaction score
5
Hi, all,

Regarding your questions,

1. I'm shooting 10 meters, just to sight the gun in.

2. 70grains of elephant powder. .490 round ball. Homemade patch from old shirt, dumped on beeswax and olive oil mixture.

3. My gun is tratitions deerhunter kit.
I lost it's plastic front sight so I'm filing down a new metal one.

4. Thanks for the math lessons (I mean real, real thanks) but its too much for a simple guy like me.


Ok, reading all messages it seems that I could keep my rear sigh half way when filling the front sight.

But there's also the advice below, that makes me think if I really should maintain my rear sight halfway:

"""'As for what height to set an adjustable rear sight before filing it's your discretion but I'd suggest you start high then file the front down until you get the gun shooting at the desired elevation. Then, if you have enough front sight left, work to balance the front and rear sights until you have a bit of adjustment in the rear sight to play with."""


Well, I'm lost.
Halfway or upper way ?

I a complete noob and I am not ashamed to expose my lack of experience to choose between the diferent advises above.

Thanks you all
 

Phil Coffins

54 Cal.
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
1,903
Reaction score
3,656
Location
Colorado
Rear sight in the middle.
Adjusting both sights during the process would confuse me as well. I’ll do the math for you, I’ll need the measurements noted above and then I’ll give you some ruler measurement to move your sights once before you shoot again. You’ll be close then fine tune.
 

rafterob

62 Cal.
Joined
Oct 3, 2007
Messages
4,090
Reaction score
1,140
Location
Asheville NC
I never thought of this question before. When I sighted in my Traditions Hawken Woodsman I left the rear sight in the middle position for 25 yard sight in. I give it 1/2 turn to adjust for 100 yards. Now I can't imagine having to adjust it at all for anything under 25 yards so maybe it makes sense to start with the sight lower? Now I have not shot this rifle past 100 yards so have no idea how much elevation I would maybe need at distances past that.
 

Pietro

50 Cal.
Joined
Sep 15, 2020
Messages
1,123
Reaction score
1,358
i prefer to set the rear sight in the middle of it's adjustment before filing the front sight.

+1

If you do it this way, after it's zeroed, you will have the flexibility to adjust the rear sight up/down for various loads,
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
709
Reaction score
818
Location
South Dakota
Set it at its middle range and file it to where you need it. This will give you an equal range of adjustment up or down. But first determine whether you can afford to take the required amount of metal out of the sight, because you may have to deepen the notch as well. You definitely want to be happy with what you end up with in terms of aesthetics... just remember to go slow...metal doesn't like to be put back after filing,
 
Top