Canoe Alternatives

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toot

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So a guy who was new to boating rented a small boat and got his girlfriend into it. He untied the rope and they slowly drifted out into the middle of the lake.
His girlfriend noticed a large, dark cloud approaching with lightning and thunder flashing and booming so she said, "Don't you think we should get back to the dock? Where are the oars?"

"Oars??" the guy asked. "We don't need oars."
With that, he opened a large sack and pulled out several jars of salmon eggs which he promptly dumped into the bottom of the boat. After a few minutes with nothing happening he said, "I don't understand it. I did like the book said to do. It said I should roe the boat."
now I rely like that one. one that I have never heard before! there are hundred of canoe jokes.
 

Loyalist Dave

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There's an antique shop near our home that has an old aluminum canoe that's about 17' long. It has a beautiful shape, similar to the birch-bark ones. The man said he will give me a price after he and his wife discuss it, because they just got it. Said not less than $300 and not more than $500, but he'll let me know in a few days. I looked canoes up online and used ones are more than that, especially aluminum ones which are twice as much and more!

I am seriously considering getting it because it's built like a tank. Weighs 70-80 pounds, he says.
Well the reason they are so popular is just that..., built like a tank. Canoe rental places, youth groups, church groups, the all buy once; cry once, ..., and then have the things for decades. Youngsters who don't understand about rocks..., no corrosion per se..., get a dent, bang it out with a mallet, get a hole, bang most of it back into place with a mallet, then hit it with a sealant (Flexseal works great these days) ;)

Not sure what you're looking to do but...., the problems with the aluminum boats are...,

Weight. I cannot up one atop my Subaru Impreza, which is my Adventuring Car.

As they are metal, you set out on a quiet, early morning, just as the sun is topping the trees, and a mist is rising from the water, where there is barely a ripple. Dressed in period attire you may have just slipped backwards in time two and a half centuries. You spot what may be a mature buck near the shore, and as you turn the canoe to silently get a bit closer, so the mist won't obscure your view... BANG..., you or your paddling companion inadvertently hit the side of the aluminum canoe with the edge of the paddle, and the noise can be heard for a mile or two. Whatever you thought you saw is gone; might as well have touched off a cannon....:confused:

Aluminum..., they are summertime boats, as when it gets down to freezing, you are going to feel that for sure, when riding and when handling, and makes for a very cold shelter. Using the canoe as part of your shelter is one of the advantage of canoe trekking, and I'm told how George Washington Sears (aka Nessmuk) did it.

CANOE SHELTER 4.jpg


LD
 

tenngun

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Don't quote me (I'd have to look it up again) but I think inflatable boats date back at least as far as the Civil War, if not a little further.
There is a stone carving from Assyria from pre Persian empire times, but I don’t recall how early, that shows Assyrian soldiers using inflated goat skins to get them across a river on way to a battle.
 

Loyalist Dave

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There is a stone carving from Assyria from pre Persian empire times, but I don’t recall how early, that shows Assyrian soldiers using inflated goat skins to get them across a river on way to a battle.
The current descendants of the Incans, still use ancient style, reed boats, to fish in the ocean....

INCAN REED BOAT 3.jpg


I wonder if one found enough river cane, harvested it and dried it, if something like that could be used today ??

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toot

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There is a stone carving from Assyria from pre Persian empire times, but I don’t recall how early, that shows Assyrian soldiers using inflated goat skins to get them across a river on way to a battle.
sorta like a buffalo skin bull boat, used by INDIANS & MOUNTIAN MEN!
 

appalichian hunter

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Loyalist Dave, I have used a canoe a few times for shelter as you mentioned. The set with the tarp makes a rather comfortable place to hole up for a night. It is low enough and very dependable if the wind is blowing, always do the set with the back of the canoe facing the wind, even a small fire off one end works well the canoe actually serves two purposes one a shelter and the other a wind break for the fire.
 

appalichian hunter

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Also forgot to mention if hunting with the canoe (mine is aluminum) I will take the black foam tubing that is split on one side and apply this to the top of the rails also a old rubber bottom bath room rug is placed on the floor where the seat is this helps deaden the bumps from movement, the tubing can also be placed on the shaft of the paddle. This is a deadly set up for hunting squirrels along a creek. Perhaps not a traditional approach but works.
 

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Are you fiberglass canoe lovers calling composite canoes "fiberglass" collectively ?
Because they are two completely different animals IMO. Composite canoes are great. Fiberglass not.
 

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This is the cedar canvas canoe my dad and I built in 2012 that I trek with.
Not pc to 18th century but it’s interior is very similar to a birchbark and it’s taken me to where the game is enough times to have earned her keep.View attachment 44717iView attachment 44716View attachment 44715
Beautiful! I love the width at the beam, more of a 'laker'? Might be a little slower to paddle, but I'm a little slower nowadays too LOL! Somebody once said 'I'm 300 lbs. of heavenly joy; I'm built for comfort, not for speed!' Better to camp under in bad weather too, I bet! Also love the neck yoke/thwart.
 

Treestalker

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Also forgot to mention if hunting with the canoe (mine is aluminum) I will take the black foam tubing that is split on one side and apply this to the top of the rails also a old rubber bottom bath room rug is placed on the floor where the seat is this helps deaden the bumps from movement, the tubing can also be placed on the shaft of the paddle. This is a deadly set up for hunting squirrels along a creek. Perhaps not a traditional approach but works.
How long have rubber trees been growing in India? Since Ganesh was knee high to a toadstool?
 

Billy Boy

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When considering plywood, very few vendors carry marine grade plywood - which uses better glue and has no interior (inside ply layers) voids. A boat built with lumberyard grade ply will be just as labor intensive to build but will have structural and rot issues that can be avoided with marine grade wood. The 13' cat boat that I built in 1971 is still sound but I remember having to drive over 150 miles to get the marine plywood (also cleaning out the local hardware of brass screws multiple times! Today I would just order the 1000 screws on line).

Painting a fiberglass canoe makes a lot of sense to me - cheaper & easier than a build (& avoids the giveaway "bong" noise of aluminum. A used canoe is not expensive & if scraped up a bit, you can knock the price down a bit & just paint over the scrapes.
Exterior plywood is cheap and “weatherproof” as far as proof goes. If you are gonna cover it with 6oz glass and epoxy, the defects on the back side don’t matter. Add dye to the last coat of epoxy and make it any color you want.
 

Coot

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Exterior plywood is cheap and “weatherproof” as far as proof goes. If you are gonna cover it with 6oz glass and epoxy, the defects on the back side don’t matter. Add dye to the last coat of epoxy and make it any color you want.
It is not just the visible defects on the back of A/C grade plywood, but as I mentioned, the internal invisible voids in the inner ply layers that can interfere with fasteners & act as water traps. How much use & time in the water & how long does one want it to last? There is a good reason that marine grade plywood costs more, just as bronze or galvanized nails will last longer.
 
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It is not just the visible defects on the back of A/C grade plywood, but as I mentioned, the internal invisible voids in the inner ply layers that can interfere with fasteners & act as water traps. How much use & time in the water & how long does one want it to last? There is a good reason that marine grade plywood costs more, just as bronze or galvanized nails will last longer.
First, a plywood pirogue isn't that labor intensive. Second, it isn't the Queen Mary. It's a simple boat. Third, HC boats were temporary things. I think you are making a mountain out of a mole hill.

Once someone gets over being afraid of actually doing it, boatbuilding is easy enough that using cheap materials makes sense.
 

Coot

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First, a plywood pirogue isn't that labor intensive. Second, it isn't the Queen Mary. It's a simple boat. Third, HC boats were temporary things. I think you are making a mountain out of a mole hill.

Once someone gets over being afraid of actually doing it, boatbuilding is easy enough that using cheap materials makes sense.

Having built several wooden boats & still use one that I built 50 years ago, I can say from experience that some (such as a punt) are easy to build (assuming some basic tools & woodworking experience) while others such as a whitehall can be a bit daunting. I prefer to spend a bit more & do things once, others may want to look on it as a learning experience & not "risk" the better materials or only plan a few seasons use (in which case fiberglass cloth & resin would be a waste of time & money). I am sure that the OP can decide which path suits him best - which is the whole point of offering options.
 
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