Can swabbing between shots encourage misfires?

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Answer to original question: no
But, if you use a dripping wet swab it will cause problems.
I dampen a small square of baby blanket flannel with spit and swab between every shot with that.
 

Ben Meyer

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I swab between shots with both my flintlock and percussion, and never have misfires, or ignition issues. Slightly damp patch, down and up one time, cotton patch, using homemade moosemilk.
 

flconch53

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I keep a PC of cloth tied on my shooting bag strap and depending on the weather I wipe the frizzen and the pan before priming burnt powder really draws moisture
 

flconch53

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Not knowing what part of the world you live in all I can say is in humid climate it makes a big difference. More addicted to quick ignition than swabbing
 

hanshi

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I don't swab between shots because I don't have to. A thick patch and the right lube makes it all but completely unnecessary. Yes, sometimes a prb is a little stubborn and usually results (in my case) from a bit of folding over of the corner of the patch. Sometimes the patch will wrinkle up and cause resistance. Plus I'm always concerned that swabbing will cause misfires.
 
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I don't swab between shots because I don't have to. A thick patch and the right lube makes it all but completely unnecessary. Yes, sometimes a prb is a little stubborn and usually results (in my case) from a bit of folding over of the corner of the patch. Sometimes the patch will wrinkle up and cause resistance. Plus I'm always concerned that swabbing will cause misfires.
Yep, the swab/don't swab debate has been going on for ages. :thumb:
 

bang

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With the right thickness patch and lube the barrel gets swabbed when ball is rammed plus no debris gets in flash channel.
I shoot 3 rounds with a .010 patch then move up to a .012 or ,015. Lube is 75% wax and 25% veggie oil congealed together. The wax helps. The fouling is softer than just powder fouling.
 

Ben Meyer

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It's simple, actually. I used drylubed patches, white cotton with a 7:1 mix of water and ballistol. Why? Because my rifle told me to. I initially tried MULTIPLE combinations(at least 10) of different lubes and patching materials, and this was the most accurate. Drylubed patches IME need stabbing between shots. Like I said, Mr Flintlocks wet lubed patches, which I also use, don't. But why not use THE most accurate load?

Hence, swabbing between shots.

The addiction to unnecessary swabbing baffles my brain!
 

Old Hawkeye

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I have thought for a long time that when my cleaning patch is too wet, my cap lock rifle is more likely to misfire.
The trick is defining where 'too wet' begins. But sopping is definitely too wet.

If I clean after every shot, then I'm not afraid of pushing much fouling down to the touch hole - because there isn't much, it hasn't built up. (Is your touch hole right on top of your breech plug? That may be a reason your mileage might vary.)

When in doubt as to whether your vent is open, push a wire into that touch hole.

But I like to clean all the way to the bottom for safety reasons: I have been there when someone else's gun flashed on loading, and he was burned. Not just burned a little, $400 hospital bill.
$400 is what they charge for a Band-Aid these days!
 

dave951

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Lots of answers both ways but the real answer is- maybe. It would depend on the quality of the powder (good stuff/less fouling), how "wet" is the patch, how tight is the patch, in short there are lots of variables.

What I've found is a damp patch, and I don't mean dripping soaking wet, on a loose fitting jag will never cause a problem. I did some experiments with this on a new Investarms 50cal barrel. Using a tight patch, it shoved fouling into the breech area. Using a loose patch on a 45 caliber jag, it only removed some of the fouling and there were no misfires nor, an excessive buildup of fouling. And yes, I checked the barrel with an endoscope to confirm.
 

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