Butt forward?

Discussion in 'Civil War' started by Homesteader, Apr 5, 2019.

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  1. Apr 5, 2019 #1

    Homesteader

    Homesteader

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    During and right after the unCivil War, do you all think the partisans / guerrilla's wore their revolvers butt forward as I've read many did, or maybe in Slim Jims like good ole Josie Wales? ;-)

    It makes me wonder if they drew cross-draw, reverse draw, straight draw... Y'all know what I'm asking. I'm genuinely interested in this.
     
  2. Apr 5, 2019 #2

    Tom A Hawk

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    As I understand it, the butt forward, cavalry draw was developed for saber carrying cavalrymen where the saber was considered the primary weapon for the right hand. However, carrying the pistol butt forward allowed a draw by either hand is necessary. If a saber was not being worn I presume the revolver would be worn in which ever manner the fella preferred. As a handgun hunter, sometimes I wear strong side, sometimes cross draw. I find that longer barreled pistols are more easily drawn from a cross draw holster.
     
  3. Apr 5, 2019 #3

    bang

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    Being capable with both hands I prefer a weak side cross draw.
     
  4. Apr 5, 2019 #4

    Smokey Plainsman

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    Get a slim jim crossy drawster.
     
  5. Apr 5, 2019 #5

    Artificer

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    Wild Bill Hickock was famous for wearing his pair of Colt 1851 Navy's butt forward and tucked into his Sash, when he even had a hint there would be danger around. His speed of draw, even with the pistols butt forward, was often written to be faster than anyone he went up against using a butt to the rear holster and was amazingly fast.

    "Slim Jim" or "California Style" holsters were made for single shot pistols in the 1840's and in the 1850's for Colt and other revolvers in San Francisco, the latter mostly used by gold prospectors and some farm and ranch owners. Though original butt forward models of these holsters were made, it seems the butt to the rear pattern was more common.

    Gus
     
  6. Apr 6, 2019 #6

    Carbon 6

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    I prefer straight draw holsters, even though my C.A.S. rig had one cross draw.
    With a straight draw the momentum over run still means you hit, whereas with a cross draw you can sweep past the target. You also have to worry about breaking the 180 rule with a cross draw. This is just what works for me, there are so many factors that come into play.
     
  7. Apr 7, 2019 #7

    tenngun

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    Do not the British officers ware their pistols butt forward and on right side? Was that for a left hand draw?
     
  8. Apr 7, 2019 #8

    ADK Bigfoot

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    tenngun:

    British officers wore sabers. That was their primary weapon. The weak-hand cross-draw was to defend themselves when thrown from their mounts or dismounted defense.
     
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  9. Apr 7, 2019 #9

    Nativearizonan

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    The answer is, Yes.
     
  10. Apr 9, 2019 #10

    Homesteader

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    Perfect! :thumb:
     
  11. Apr 9, 2019 #11

    Loyalist Dave

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    This continued into the modern era, as you can see from this still from the movie, The Wind and The Lion, which is in the top three authentic historic combat sequences ever done in Hollywood (the Marines are carrying the proper rifles for 1904 btw).
    USMC Officer, Sword and Revolver.JPG
    The Marine Corps Captain is holding his officer sword in his right hand and is shooting a rifle toting guard with the revolver in his left hand...,

    The entire 8 minutes of the fight may be seen below, and although the movie clip does not show BP guns, the beduins in the movie do carry flintlocks in some cases.

    Although set in 1904..., you get the right idea.

    LD
     
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  12. Apr 9, 2019 #12

    Juice Jaws

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    I carry two butt forward. I think I look cool that way. I play Josie Wales one in each hand shooting at hanging 3lb coffee cans from about 20 feet. That is hard to do, of course having arthritis in both hands and wrist don't help. Old Clint had to practice a lot to shoot as fast as he does with two hand cannons.
     
  13. Apr 9, 2019 #13

    Eutycus

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    I carry mostly butt forward in a crossdraw. But without a crossdraw holster, just regular. Whatever is comfortable to YOU.
     
  14. Apr 9, 2019 #14

    Rat

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    I've found cross-draw, left side, butt forward to be far superior, but when I wear a pistol it's for hunting, and not for gun-slinging or anything close to a fast-draw. I am right handed. That keeps the rifle from banging into the pistol, (although 99% of my holsters are flap holsters) and it's more comfortable and out of the way when I sit down. When I do sit, I can also pull/slide the holster more towards center, which makes it easier to draw, if I should need to. (usually carry a small caliber pistol, such as a .36", in case Mr.Grouse shows up.) My holsters are also all "canted", which makes them even more comfortable when sitting, and overall more "close to hand" when walking.

    Used to have a friend that carried his pistol, when hunting, in a open-top holster, on his right side, and was constantly banging his rifle into the pistol. Drove me nutz, but I never said anything.
     
  15. Apr 12, 2019 at 6:33 AM #15

    Artificer

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    Prior to the action, I LOVE the scene where the U.S. Navy Fleet Commander is briefing one of the local Junior Diplomats on the action to come. The very nervous Junior Diplomat chokes out a question, "But what would President Roosevelt think?" To which the Marine Captain with a huge grin on his face and in a gravely voice replied, "He'd love it!" (Which shocked the Junior Diplomate even more.)

    This also may be one of the very few movies that shows a Naval Landing force of Sailors in support of the Marines and the historic accuracy there was quite good as well. The wheeled machine gun they have is actually a Model 1914, but the only difference between that and the correct Model 1898 was finned barrel. A working Model 1898 was not available when the movie was filmed, so they used the next best thing.

    Finally immediately after the action, the Naval Band is playing John Phillip Sousa's March, "Semper Fidelis" which Sousa wrote in 1888 and is named after the Marine Corps Motto. I realized that the first time I watched the movie because I was a rudimental drummer for 8 years before coming into the Marine Corps and that march and "The Thunderer" were the two marches I was tested on the snare drum in Boot Camp. We had played both marches so many times in Junior and Senior High School, I closed the book after a quick scan of the music for each march, then played it. The Director of the San Diego Marine Band was impressed and offered me a position in his Band immediately after Boot Camp at the end of the test; but though I thanked him profusely, I wanted to be an Armorer. So I often joked for the rest of my 26 years, I only had that one chance to "beat my own drum" in the Corps. :D

    Gus
     

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