Butcher knife

Discussion in 'Accoutrements' started by Gun Tramp, Aug 22, 2019.

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  1. Aug 22, 2019 #1

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

    32 Cal

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    Not intending to replicate anything here, just wanted to see if a browned blade would be attractive. I shortened a Russell 10" Butcher blade to 7" and used about umpteen applications of cold brown to achieve the "unusual" coloring. Not the intended result. I've had pretty good results browning different things but this is probably the highest carbon content steel I've tried. I couldn't get past a mottled appearance and ended up with green, blue, and black in addition to the plum color desired. Of note is the Russell etching which stayed, sort of, despite being treated the same as the rest of the blade. The scales are of Mulberry that I harvested, which is my new favorite wood. It is slightly less dense than Oak, close-grained, and takes a good polish. Pins are ground wire from the farm store. Honest use wear would make this tool look either much better or much worse; no in-between! 005.JPG 008.JPG
     
    sawyer04 and Westbrook like this.
  2. Aug 22, 2019 #2

    smo

    smo

    smo

    70 Cal. MLF Supporter

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    Looks good! How did you shorten the blade? Saw/Grinder?
     
  3. Aug 23, 2019 #3

    Trade knife J

    Trade knife J

    Trade knife J

    32 Cal

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    I like it! Well done Sir!
     
  4. Aug 23, 2019 #4

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

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    Thanks smo; I used the thinnest abrasive cut-off disc I had for a 4 1/2" angle grinder, in this case .040". I trimmed to within 1/8" of the desired outline then used a coarse 6" grinding wheel (worn) held flat in the hand to hone the clamped blade back to the line, dunking the stone in water often to get rid of the "cuttings."
     
  5. Aug 23, 2019 #5

    smo

    smo

    smo

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    Thanks for the info...
     
  6. Aug 24, 2019 #6

    Stony Broke

    Stony Broke

    Stony Broke

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    Should work well for you. It sort of reminds me of my favorite old butcher knife I use in the woods often. I bought an old handmade knife once at a swap meet for 4.00 that had the old wood handles about rotted off. I replaced the handles with a couple pieces of walnut I found in my shop. I work on lots of feral hogs, and it's been the best I have found for that sort of stuff. I just keep a steel handy to touch up the blade now and then and go at em'.
    I've used Randals and all types of knives, and always end up back with my old butcher knife. I hope you have good luck with your's well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
  7. Aug 24, 2019 #7

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

    Treestalker

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    Nice job, really like the mulberry wood scale handle! My next door neighbor Richard's family had a huge Mulberry tree in their back yard when I was growing up in S.E. Texas, it must have been 2 feet in diameter. We used to climb up in it and turn purple eating mulberries. Mom used to get up and snort about my clothes being ruined, but Richard's mom used to absolutely blow a gasket since Richard "knew better" than to commit such heresy. He also had a gaggle of sisters who took special pains to remind him of his correction. They finally cut the old tree down after I was grown and no one thought to save the wood I guess. It might have been a state record. The state record yellow poplar was in Newton County just north of us, IIRC.
     
  8. Aug 24, 2019 #8

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

    Gun Tramp

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    Thanks, all. About mulberry; I have a friend who heats with wood and utilizes about anything that grows around here. He says mulberry is very heavy when cut and very heavy when dry. And seems to have the btu content of coal!
     
  9. Aug 24, 2019 #9

    sawyer04

    sawyer04

    sawyer04

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    no better knife than one that has been tried and tested and carbon steel. I scrounge the junk shops for the old butcher knives that have been abandoned and give up on. Sure, I like the fancy, pretty stuff, and they work, but the old masters get the job done, just add new scales and sharpen, ah, to me that's beauty along with a new sheath, good to go.
    Great looking sticker Gun Tramp.
     

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