Buckskin leather colors???

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Ran across some documentation 3 weeks ago that Daniel Boone preferred to wear black buckskins... Obviously dyed in some way. It may have been more effective camo in some ways, as long as he wasn't mistaken for a bear!
I had a hunter frock made back in the 90s right after I watched "Black Robe" the body was black, and the fringe was red after a few years of wearing it I was looking grey and pink. Those are not my colors, so I dyed it a dark brown..:)
 

Beau Robbins

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Ran across some documentation 3 weeks ago that Daniel Boone preferred to wear black buckskins... Obviously dyed in some way. It may have been more effective camo in some ways, as long as he wasn't mistaken for a bear!
Not camo, but fashion. He was a Quaker and they tended towards dark conservative sartorial choices. For guys almost perpetually on horseback it was a good choice to have sturdy hard wearing breeches that still match a black coat or jacket.
 

beardedhorse

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Chrome tanning came into use after rendezvous and lead to bison slaughter for leather for machinery belts. Tannic acid leather used for leather coats made for Tom Tobin and Kit Carson. The bright yellow-orange in pine fades with UV light, the same with osage orange dye. Corncobs, cottonwood punk, punk fir, sweetgrass, sage, apple, mesquite, willow, walnut, ash all give different colors for brain tan. my cedar bedding chips gives a pleasant cedar chest smell and not bad light brown. Cottonwood makes hides smell like a wet dog depending on which part of the punk you use. Tawing was alum was used in Biblical times. The sumac berries we made pink lemonade with in Boy Scouts. Some dyes work better with mordants but they can be deadly poisonous depending on what you use. have dyed brain tan with cochineal for reds and indigo for blue. Walnut dyed hand prints on hides for camo. Rev. War had some camo leather hunting frocks.
 

smo

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Ran across some documentation 3 weeks ago that Daniel Boone preferred to wear black buckskins... Obviously dyed in some way. It may have been more effective camo in some ways, as long as he wasn't mistaken for a bear!


The Man in Black….

I always wondered where Cash came up with that handle….

 

SBJ

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True Brain tanned Hides breath, unlike chrome tanned hides. Have worn brain tanned garments up to 120 degrees, and stayed mildly comfortable. Also wore chrome tanned clothes in North Carolina for a year, and lost 20# of water weight, from sweating....

Urine was popular to tan hides with, in Colonial America. People sold the content of their chamber pots to the tannaries. Good times!!
 
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From time to time Crazy Crow gets hold of Smoked German Tan. They charge a couple bucks more for the smell.
I dyed some in a Walnut bath after doing my frock. DO Not put hide in Hot water, it will begin to boil (cook) it and you could end up reverting it to rawhide! But bathing it in Room Temp it took the dye well and holds longer then textile; my frock that soaked over night is real faded now but the CC German tan is still as dark as the day I did it. Had work it just a bit as it did stiffen up a little and it did 'compact' the fibers; Walnut dyed is tougher to punch and sew then non dyed from the same hide.
 
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