Buck and Ball Use by Continental Army

Discussion in 'Revolutionary War' started by cankeney, Feb 2, 2020.

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  1. Feb 13, 2020 #21

    Spence10

    Spence10

    Spence10

    Cannon

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    I don't know about the regulars, but at least some of the militias did. Journal of Arthur Harris of Bridgewater coy of militia, requirements for Mass. militia in 1775: “Each soldier to provide himself with/ A Good Fire Arm/ A Steel or Iron Ram Rod and Spring for Same/ a Worm Priming Wire and Brush/ A Bayonet fitted to his Gun/ A Scabard & Belt Therefor/ A Cuting Sword or Tomahawk or Hatchet/ A Pouch Containing a Cartridge Box that will Hold fifteen Rounds of Cartridges at Least/ A Hundred Buck Shot/ A Jack Knife & Tow for Wadding/ Six flints, one Pound of Powder/ forty Leaden Balls fitted to the Gun/ A Knapsack & Blanket/ A Canteen or Wood Bottle to hold 1 Quart.”

    Spence



     
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  2. Feb 13, 2020 #22

    cankeney

    cankeney

    cankeney

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    That is interesting. I had never noticed buck shot being part militia requirements anywhere. So apparently use of buck and ball loads was nothing new at the time of the AWI. Makes sense given the terrain in the colonies. Kind of along the same lines that cavalry didn't play a large part in the revolution or F&I. We didn't have the large open areas like Europe.
    Cankeney
     
  3. Feb 13, 2020 #23

    Spence10

    Spence10

    Spence10

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    The Pennsylvania Gazette
    July 3, 1776
    LONDON, March 29.
    It is astonishing how any man could even dream of sending cavalry to America. Only let us for a moment conceive a dragoon, with his bags, his bucket, his boots, his belts, his havresack, his cloak, his cantine, his broad sword and his carbine, galloping round a tree to catch a rifleman or an Indian! It is a cow catching a hare. The idea is laughable, if the consequences were not serious.

    Spence
     
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  4. Feb 16, 2020 #24

    Brokennock

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    One of the best quotes yet. Hilarious....
     
  5. Feb 17, 2020 #25

    FlinterNick

    FlinterNick

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    It depended on the molds they had at the time. Buck and Ball cartridges were available and ordered.

    1775, 1776 the most common musket in the continental army was the Brown Bess, usually long lands and militia pattern muskets, Dutch muskets too and earlier Charleville muskets. Most of these muskets were at the smallest bore .72 and at the largest .80, so the most common mold at the time was .687 ball or .69 caliber ball. Buckshot molds were available.

    after 1776 /77 with the import of the 1763, 1766 and 1774 Charlevilles, these muskets varied from .69 caliber to .72 depending where they were made in France, but the standard French mold was around .667. The French were not known for using buck and ball, so they likely wouldn’t have supplied the molds.

    The most common gun that for buck and ball was the Brown Bess for sure.
     

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