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Brass lock plates...durable?

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brazosland

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I am seeing a few rifles for sale recently with brass lock plates.

Seem to be mostly high end guns. How durable are these locks? I suppose you couldn’t wear one out hunting, but if it was your only rifle and you fired it a lot would it be one an issue?
 

Treestalker

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Why, in no time at all the screws in that brass plate will be swapping holes like an old engine's pistons swapping cylinders they'll be so loose! Heaven knows anybody who owns a brass framed revolver is living on borrowed time! Any time someone replaces a stalwart steel gun part with soft withering brass, you can bet it's a plot to get your money and shaft a gun owner. I own 3 brass framed revolvers and all of them are of course junk, but still tight, and one shoots better than any BP revolver I ever owned, I do believe. I think a brass plate will last just about until the Rapture, and if it doesn't just braze up the hole, re- drill it and tap it, and keep on clucking!
 

tallpine

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Kevin, Chambers offers a brass lock plate upgrade on some of his locks. They have steel bushings for the tumbler and other high wear areas. There is a few other high end lock makers that also offer this option. They ain't cheap
 

FlinterNick

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For the most part yes. Brass frames and plates are fine. the Brass is hardened with peening and cold pounding before its made into the final product. It should hold up just as long as any other type of gun With steel parts.

The problem I’ve had with brass framed gun parts is that the screw holes often strip out with disassembly. You can’t really braze or heat brass enough to weld up stripped parts because brass loses zinc when heated and becomes weaker, just about the only thing you can do is redrill worn holes and tap to a larger screw thread or sweat solder in a bushing.
 

LawrenceA

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The problem I’ve had with brass framed gun parts is that the screw holes often strip out with disassembly. You can’t really braze or heat brass enough to weld up stripped parts because brass loses zinc when heated and becomes weaker, just about the only thing you can do is redrill worn holes and tap to a larger screw thread or sweat solder in a bushing.
You may be able to use a hardened steel thread insert bit not sure. They use these in alloy engine blocks.
 

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