Brass Jag History?

Discussion in 'Shooting Accessories' started by Smokey Plainsman, Dec 14, 2019.

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  1. Dec 14, 2019 #1

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

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    Guys we’ve all seen them. The brass jags:

    [​IMG]

    But when did these threaded, stepped, brass jags first show up on muzzleloaders?

    The 1970s? What about earlier, were they ever say used in the late “traditional” muzzleloading era such as with the percussion rifles? Just curious.

    -Smokey
     
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  2. Dec 15, 2019 #2

    tenngun

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    I don’t know how old for that style. A jag was supplied with fine cased guns by the early nineteenth, and fine long guns by later.
    But that style? Ml boom after Turner Kirkland.
     
  3. Dec 15, 2019 #3

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

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    Ya know, it is possible to clean your rifle without using a jag at all, or any ramrod tip accessory. You can use just a bare rod, a piece of string, and a piece if tow or cloth.
    It does work.
     
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  4. Dec 15, 2019 #4

    Rifleman1776

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    The shape is very like the ends whittled into 'wiping sticks' I have seen in museums. Not a new idea just a new material. But, like tenngun said, many accessories were found in fine cased sets that would not be found in the north Americans woodsman pouch.
     
  5. Dec 15, 2019 #5

    Loyalist Dave

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    Jags go back to the 17th century. "Brass" ones, unsure.

    GUN TOOLS 2.JPG

    LD
     
  6. Dec 15, 2019 #6

    rich pierce

    rich pierce

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    LD, I had not seen that type of jag with a bell-bottomed end before. Very cool. I will try to make one this week. If you have any more pictures that would be great. I wonder what the slot is for.
     
  7. Dec 15, 2019 #7

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

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    Interesting. I’ve been researching jags and worms lately.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2019 #8

    Smokey Plainsman

    Smokey Plainsman

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    VERY cool. Are some of those breech scrapers maybe?
     
  9. Dec 15, 2019 #9

    Coot

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    I seem to recall reading about the Lewis & Clark expedition cutting "wiping sticks" presumably to use for cleaning rather than loading the guns. These "wiping sticks" could have had the ends whittled into a jag, or used as cut to push down some tow or bit of rag on a string.
     
  10. Dec 15, 2019 #10

    Carbon 6

    Carbon 6

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    I "whittled" one of my rod ends in such an attempt. It did not work that well but does make the rod easier to grab used the other way round when you get to the bottom of the barrel.
    I whittled it wrong.
     
  11. Dec 15, 2019 #11

    plmeek

    plmeek

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    I agree with Rifleman1776 and Coot. Wiping sticks sometimes had a jag like feature whittled on the end of the stick.

    I showed this painting by Karl Bodmer before of an Assiniboin Indian with a wiping stick in addition to a ramrod in his trade gun.
    [​IMG]

    The wiping stick appears to have a worm with tow wrapped around it on the upper end and a jag like feature on the lower end.
    Bodmer Pasesick Kaskutau_detail enlarged.jpg

    As Loyalist Dave pointed out, jag like tools have been around for a long time. The ones he showed in the picture are all iron which makes sense because iron could easily be forged and filed to the desired shape. Brass could not be forged and needed to be cast and filed. More time consuming than forging iron.

    I don't know when brass jags became a common tool. Maybe late 19th century or later. Certainly after the mid-19th century. I say that because the modern brass jag is turned on a lathe. A suitable lathe for turning a brass jag wasn't commonly available until mid-19th century as the industrial revolution really took off.
     
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