Brass furniture/Patina or Shiny ?

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Jaegermeister

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Maybe a silly question but my jaeger has about 5 years of patina on the brass furniture(R.E. Davis). Do ya'll think that historically the brass was left to age or do you think folks liked to keep their prized firearms shined up? I play with the idea of this jaeger being carried by a militia man years after it was built.Perhaps a hand-me-down weapon pressed into service or something. Humor me. Sometimes I just get an itch to do something to my rifle and I have a can of Never-Dull looking at me. I know it boils down to personal preference but I'm just asking for opinions.
 
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It's really your preferance. I like a dull aged look over shiney. So the easiest best way I've found was to rub my cleaning patches after I was done cleaning my gun on the brass. Only have to do it a few times then it looks fine, nice and dull. But thats what I prefer to do and like.
 

smoothy

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Shiny brass looks nice on a dark/fancy stock, I'll have to admit. But since I use my flintlocks for hunting, I prefer dull. Come to think of it, I don't have any brass, all browned steel. Still, there's nothing prettier than a dark stained, curly maple stock with contrasting brass. I'd have one if I had the money saved or the talent to produce such a beauty.
 

Semisane

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I don't think I've ever been busted hunting with shiny brass. Have had deer walk by within 10 yards, and so long as I didn't move they didn't give me a second glance. There's just not that much brass showing anyway. But move your head, especially wearing glasses, and you're BUSTED.
 

TVG.75

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I am partial to the aged look. When I was younger, & had shiny new guns, I tried to keep it bright but have grown to like the well used but cared for look. I'd let it continue aging. :2
 

Capt. Jas.

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Jim,

You might be able to get the history based answer you requested if you put it in the Historically Accurate Equipment section.
From what I have accumulated, you might see polished brass on a military piece or in the contents of a wealthy gentleman's gun cabinet.
 

roundball

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I keep all my firearms showroom ready, which means clean and polished...never caused any problems hunting, including Turkey hunting with their sharp eyes and color perception.
I've used brasso, never dull, etc.
 

Jaegermeister

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Thanks guys. It was just a late night random thought. Capt. Jas, I'll try to keep future posts in their proper catagory. This forum has grown over the years!
 

Vaino

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From a utilitarian viewpoint I don't think it makes any difference....some "neater" folk like it shiny and "us slobs" like it dull or aged. But from another angle...I've got more important things to do than shine brass. Didn't like it in the army, in fact, thought it was some kind of harrassment or punishment. "Brass" in the army means "the bosses" and that's another reason I dislike "polishing brass"....Fred
 

Leonredbeard

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Back when I had my first (1979) shiny new Lyman Mountain Plains rifle with alllll that brass, it dulled quickly. So one day I got out the abrasive paste and cleaned it all shiny and new again. Then the next trip to the range and it was a grungy again. Since then I do not bother to shine it after it gets dull.
volatpluvia
 
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It is a personal preference. Some intentionally dull the brass. Some polish the brass and then give it a coat of clear lacquar to keep it shinny.
 

Tom Compton

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Dull, please.

As a matter of fact I would love to locate a steel replacement patch box for a TC Hawken. Have nose cap, trigger guard, butt plate, etc in steel but only a brass patch box.
 

boom

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roundball said:
I keep all my firearms showroom ready, which means clean and polished...never caused any problems hunting, including Turkey hunting with their sharp eyes and color perception.
I've used brasso, never dull, etc.
Brasso Brasso MMMMM now that brings back memorys. :) . boomm.
 

tg

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"Do ya'll think that historically the brass was left to age or do you think folks liked to keep their prized firearms shined up?"

Was this the main question you were asking? just wondering as I only saw one post addressing it.
 

Emet Huntsman

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I would venture that if you were doing the military thing you would probably keep the brass nice and shiny. Pure civilian, then they probably were less scrupulous about "spit and polish." I suspect polishing brass 200 years ago was more involved than slathering on some Brasso and rubbing it off :v
 

Jaegermeister

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You are correct, tg. But that's to be expected on forums like this especially with a corny question like I asked. Glad to see that the good 'ol boys are still here like you, Stumpy ,Zonie and many others that I remember. You folks always give good sound advice and truthful info even if it's not what people want to hear. I don't mind the little diversions threads can take but I guess I did post this in the wrong spot. I guess I was a bit too eager to jump back into the camp discussions. I still shoot that jaeger rifle I built back in '04 with a curly maple stock instead of the more correct walnut. Live and learn. For what it's worth I'm gonna polish my brass 'cause I want to. That attitude is probably historically correct. Good to hear from you, tg. Jim
 

Jaegermeister

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Right on, Parson. I did my share of that in the navy(hospital corpsman, USS Independence CV-62)way back. I just have this compulsion to tinker with my flintlock. Can't seem to leave her alone. That didn't sound right! :redface:
 

Many Klatch

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Parson, soldiers from the 1600's to the ACW were known to take brick dust on a damp rag and use it to polish brass and steel. It kept the sergeant major happy.

Many Klatch
 
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