Bowl of the red

Discussion in 'French & Indian War' started by tenngun, Oct 10, 2019.

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  1. Oct 10, 2019 #1

    tenngun

    tenngun

    tenngun

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    just reading Walter Bornemans ‘The French and Indian war.
    It’s a good retelling if the war, and brings in world wide and political aspects of the war we in America don’t often think about.
    One of the things the book does mention a lot is the sad state of French larders.
    Not only was the French out numbered but them they had were under fed.
    Why?
    Between Indian crops and European crops that did well in Canada or the Mississippi Valley there was plenty to grow, and plenty of land to grow it on. The French had lots of experience as farmers, French cropland goes way back before it was France and before it was Long Haired Gaul.
    Every book on the war I’ve ever read talked about the hungry French. For sure they invested in trade more then colonization.
    The English moved food around the colonies, rice up the coast, wheat to Europe.
    But in General most people ate food raise within a few days walk from their front door..... so why couldn’t Quebec feed itself or Detroit ect.
    I don’t doubt but that a full belly would have ‘devoured’Wolfe.
     
  2. Oct 10, 2019 #2

    Einsiedler

    Einsiedler

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    Cannot say how things were in Canada, but down in The south the French officials had some issues with getting the men to farm. (And the French brought in rice as a crop. Food for the slaves). Apparently the men had other ideas of how to just spend their time, and farming wasn’t a popular item on that list like,,,,,,,,, hunting, trapping, fishing, chasing native girls, etc.

    Enter,,,,,,,, the Germans!

    His majesty had folks seek out industrious, agriculture minded German settlers to take up the slack for their French counterparts. Hence, the German coast of Louisiana. It met with fair success.

    Not saying there weren’t any French farmers. Just that the small number of them was an issue that got his Majesty’s attention.
     
  3. Oct 10, 2019 #3

    Flint62Smoothie

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    First I ever heard of this and while I certainly have nothing to add ... I’ll be watching this thread!
     
  4. Oct 10, 2019 #4

    Einsiedler

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    To the best of my knowledge food was not an issue in the south as the local indigenes generally had a surplus for trade. And in Louisiana the later illegal cattle trade with the Spanish was also a boost.

    I know the Spanish at the Texas colonial capital of Los Adaes
    ( only about 15 miles from The French Postes des Nachitos), early on experienced "lean" times before the illicit beef trade. But on the whole there was generally lots of cattle, honey, bear oil, and such headed down the Red River to points south and eventually NEw Orleans.

    I the days of Louis Juchreau de St. Denis, the “Corral Royale” at Natchitoches La. , (Located on the southern portion of the current Northwestern State University campus) was kept full of illegal bovines awaiting shipment down river. Horses too!
     
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  5. Oct 28, 2019 #5

    Leadball loader

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    My reading of the history of french colonial canada points the finger at the corrupt feudal system that existed. The habitants that farmed were taxed so harshly they were barely able to keep enough of what they raised to survive.
     
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  6. Oct 28, 2019 #6

    tenngun

    tenngun

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    Interesting.
     
  7. Oct 28, 2019 #7

    Carbon 6

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    The British blockaded the French coast.
     
  8. Oct 28, 2019 #8

    Leadball loader

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    The historian Francis Parkman wrote about this in his history of the last F and I war. It is wordy 19th language but tells the story of how the corrupt leadership of New France contributed to to its loss.
    The book is Montcalm and Wolfe reprinted by Barnes and Noble. took me awhile to read but it was worth it.
     
  9. Oct 28, 2019 #9

    tenngun

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    Yes they blockade, but I was asking why farms along the river couldn’t feed them selves. Two or three acres should feed a person there.
     
  10. Oct 30, 2019 #10

    Cruzatte

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    Just a hunch, tenngun; I wonder if the usual thinking was that a guy might make more money trading with the First Nations, than farming.

    Then there was that outdated feudal thing going on where a farmer wasn't actually cultivating his own land, but part of a seigneury of some rich dude.
     
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  11. Oct 30, 2019 #11

    Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave

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    I think it was a combination of things, IF I remember my history. A nation of agriculture does not mean a nation full of agriculturalists. I think a great many rogues and vagabonds and wenches were sent to New France, and the folks governing them were nobles, and did not know farming. ( English Jamestown had a similar problem with its first waves of immigrants.) You have to import the wheat for seed, and you have to know how to grow it and how to convert it [thresh] it into a crop. Prior to that you have to know how to clear the ground, how to plow for wheat, etc. Native Agriculture was much simpler and produced a surplus, and instead of making Canada similar to France, (iirc) a lot of the men thought that they should adopt native ways.

    LD
     
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